Archive for profiles

jim lauderdale hits a new lowe

jim lauderdale.

Perhaps one of the least likely stylistic destinations for a songsmith so celebrated in Americana and country circles as Jim Lauderdale would be British pop. After all, over the past three decades, his songs – many possessing a strong, traditional country air – have been recorded by George Strait, Vince Gill and Kentucky’s own Patty Loveless, among many others. He has also collaborated on full album projects with the likes of bluegrass patriarch Ralph Stanley and Americana chieftain Buddy Miller.

But dig deep into Lauderdale’s very deep satchel of musical influences and you will discover a love for the kind of pop songcraft that began, not surprisingly, with The Beatles and runs through to the comparatively modern British musings of Nick Lowe. The former inspiration more than once fuels tunes from Lauderdale’s upcoming “London Southern” album, but it’s Lowe’s crew – specifically, his producer and several longtime band members – that help realize the album’s broader musical scope.

“Really, a lot of this record is heavily Beatles influenced,” said Lauderdale, who returns to Lexington for a solo concert tonight at Willie’s Locally Known. “That’s especially true of the early Beatles (as evidenced by the hullabaloo spirit of such “London Southern” songs as “No Right Way to Be Wrong”). That was kind of where I was coming from in a lot of ways with this. It was a combination of going back to their roots and going back to my roots. The Beatles were part of my roots since I was, like, six, having seen them on Ed Sullivan first. So a lot of that stuff has been in my system for years. They were so influenced by American music and we were so influenced by them back.”

That explains how the opening tune to “London Southern” better reflects the spirit of vintage George Jones than British pop. By the time “Only So Much Time” cues up, though, the country sound turns more progressive, as if it were an outtake from Bob Dylan’s classic 1969 country-inspired album, “Nashville Skyline.” One of the key elements to this cross-continental sound is the subtle keyboard orchestration of Geraint Watkins, a long time member of Lowe’s band.

“Geraint Watkins is a real master,” Lauderdale said. “That’s all him and Neil (Brockbank, veteran Lowe producer). A lot of that stuff we just had to trust and let it be different from the other records I’ve made. Sometimes it was hard for me to let go and not second guess things. But I’m glad I let them do what they wanted to do and needed to do.”

With several members of Lowe’s band and production team on hand for “London Southern,” one has to wonder why Lowe himself wasn’t part of the party.

“Originally, Nick was going to co-produce the record,” Lauderdale said. “The problem was that he really needed the songs several weeks in advance and I didn’t have them. And I totally understand. The way I make records when I co-produce is so chaotic.  For better or for worse, I have a habit of writing under tremendous pressure. That’s just the way it sometimes turns out. But he’s of the school, logically and understandably, of needing songs in advance to plan things out and to think about doing parts, instead of just working off the cuff.”

Once completed, another query surfaced for “London Southern” – namely, finding the right time to release it. An insanely prolific artist, Lauderdale recorded the album almost three years ago, releasing a total of six other recordings in its wake. Among them were bluegrass projects, a solo acoustic record, a country album, collaborative works with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter and the North Mississippi All-Stars and more. That truckload of music may have delayed the release of “London Southern,” but it never lessened the feeling of artistic camaraderie and exploration Lauderdale experienced working with his British allies.

“I felt like we had a connection,” he said. “I was slightly nervous about working with this new group. I wasn’t nervous that they wouldn’t be able to pull it off. I was nervous that I wouldn’t be able to pull it off, and if they would like the material. But I think that we had a connection musically because we really shared the influences.”

Jim Lauderdale performs at 9 tonight at Willie’s Locally Known, 286 Southland Dr. Tickets: $17. Call 859-281-1116 or go to willieslocallyknown.com.

elizabeth cook doesn’t hold back

elizabeth cook.

Elizabeth Cook has never been one to hold back – not in the frank tales she revealed of her life and family during numerous appearances on “The Late Show with David Letterman,” not in the homey yarns she spun on her Sirius XM morning radio show “Apron Strings” and especially not on her soul-baring 2016 album “Exodus of Venus.”

A critically lauded country music renegade who is right at home channeling a subversive rock or folk inspiration if the spirit hits, Cook sees no point in hiding any personal truth, dark or otherwise, from anyone willing to give her songs a listen.

“I’m very forthcoming musically,” said Cook, who returns to town for a solo concert Thursday at The Burl. “That’s kind of the whole point. I just don’t see where I’m doing any service with my artistry if I’m holding back. We’re all here to comfort each other through our experiences and gain a deeper understanding. I mean, it’s sort of my job.”

Cook takes her work quite seriously on “Exodus of Venus,” an album cut in the aftermath of myriad personal hurdles – divorce, the deaths of family members, a family home burning down and a stint in rehab. The effects of each are worn like battle scars in a parade of proud, coarse electric songs whose titles do little to mask their sentiments – “Slow Pain,” “Straightjacket Love,” “Dyin’” and “Methadone Blues” – before the album concludes with a meditation of pure country anguish, “Tabitha Tuder’s Mama” that recalls, vocally and stylistically, Emmylou Harris’s finest work.

“If I’m any good at this, it’s because what I do is instinctive and it’s instinctive because I’m going down a rabbit hole for myself. Hopefully, that becomes relatable on the other side to other people. It’s absolutely and totally cathartic. I listen to it and I’m surprised by it. I found a lot of it to also be prophetic in things that played out since those songs were written and recorded. So it’s, first and foremost, self-serving.”

“Exodus of Venus” serves as a dynamic addition to a career that has clocked literally hundreds of performances on the Grand Ole Opry, collaborations with such Americana heroes as John Prine, Jason Isbell and Steve Earle and a 2012 trio performance here in Lexington with Midnight Oil mainstay Bones Hilman as her bassist (a show notable for, among other things, concluding not with a perhaps expected classic country cover but a lullaby-like reading of the Velvet Underground’s “Sunday Morning”).

But it was Letterman that proved one of Cook’s greatest supporters. Taken by unvarnished and very human stories about, among other subjects, her moonshine running father and his eventual incarceration, the comedian and talk host invited Cook back on “The Late Show” numerous times prior to his retirement in 2015.

“That was really cool and encouraging, but also very surprising to me,” Cook said. “It was very out of the blue. I was pretty shocked, especially at first. I couldn’t understand why I being put in that position of being asked questions and stuff. But I later became very humbled by it and, I guess, flattered by his attention about how he felt connected to me when he listened to me on the radio. I really think he wanted to introduce me to a wider audience.”

When asked about the influences that went into her country-conscious songs, Cook doesn’t point to a specific artist or recording. Her gateway into the world of songwriting and performance began at home.

“I had grown up with my mother and father being musical, watching them having a band and seeing how music was just a way of life for them and probably their greatest comfort and outlet for joy and solace. I think, by tradition, it became all that to me, too.

“So when I had an opportunity to start mining out what I would be doing for a living in that direction, it wasn’t so much that I saw the Beatles on ‘Ed Sullivan’ like Tom Petty did. I didn’t have that type of moment. For me, it was about coming up in an environment that was saturated by people directly around me making music all the time.”

Elizabeth Cook, Darrin Bradbury and Maggie Lander perform at 8 p.m. May 4 at The Burl, 375 Thompson Rd. Tickets: $12. Call 859-447-8166 or go to burlky.ticketfly.com.

the whole oates

john oates.

In the introduction to his forthcoming memoir “Change of Seasons,” pop-soul celebrity John Oates states his mission succinctly – to tell both his personal story as well as that of his remarkable 45 year friendship and artistic alliance with Daryl Hall.

“Daryl has his own unique and powerful story,” Oates writes. “One day he may choose to share it… or maybe not. But until then, I can only offer my own story.”

That is exactly what Oates does over the course of 400 pages in an immensely readable chronicle that traces not only a storied pop career but also an absorbing personal saga that runs from a childhood spent outside of Philadelphia to recent time in Nashville with renewed emphasis on a solo career. There are personal lows (divorce, financial devastation) and highs (the birth of his son) and an unexpectedly moving chapter devoted to his dog. It is the story of an especially full and prolific life, one Oates is eager to share. He will do so, ahead of a spring book tour, with a performance and reading for the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour on Monday at the Lyric Theatre.

“You know, I’ve kind of had an interesting life,” Oates said. “Obviously, people know me for the pop success I’ve had with Daryl. I understand that, but at the same time, I’ve done a lot of other things people aren’t so familiar with. So it was a chance for me to tell my story.

“One of the biggest challenges was, ‘How do I tell my personal story without it being the Hall and Oates Story, which has been so much a part of my outer life. So it really was an interesting challenge to weave my own personal story and at the same time not ignore the fact that I spent my whole adult life in this incredible musical partnership.”

The idea for “Change of Seasons” began through a series of interviews conducted with author and journalist Chris Epting, even though Oates’s own passion for writing has never been limited to music.

“I’ve always looked at myself as a writer,” he said. “I was a journalism graduate from Temple University and I’ve always known I would write a book. I just didn’t know it was going to be a memoir. But I’ve always written prose alongside the music I’ve made.”

Still, there is little denying the enormous level of stardom Oates achieved with Hall. In one of the most engaging chapters of “Change of Seasons,” Oates outlines the many artistic riches that came the duo’s way in 1985 – specifically, a mammoth tour supporting its “Big Bam Boom” album, an acclaimed performance at the Apollo Theatre with Motown legends David Ruffin and Eddie Kendrick (chronicled on a subsequent live recording) and participation in the iconic Live Aid benefit and charity single “We Are the World.” In the aftermath, citing “there was no place to go but down at that point,” Hall and Oates turned the hit machine off and went on hiatus.

“If you really want to isolate that episode, it becomes really symbolic of who I am as a person and who Daryl is,” Oates said “I don’t think people ever really knew we were very private people even though we were so commercially successful. We’re people who really care about our own personal integrity. Even though the pop songs and the stupid MTV videos – well, the silly MTV videos – kind of gave it this lighter than air quality, the reality was we were very committed and very dedicated to what we were doing. Every decision we ever made was based on what would allow us to keep making music for the rest of our lives, whether it was successful on a grand scale or a small scale. It didn’t matter to us.

“That scene, where we stepped back from this immense commercial success in 1985, was not the smartest thing to do from a commercial point of view, a business point of view or a monetary point of view. But it didn’t matter because we made a conscious decision to make sure we could somehow sustain this on one level or another. And that’s what we’ve done.”

John Oates and John Michael Montgomery perform for the WoodSongs Old Time Radio Hour on 6:30 p.m. March 6 at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center, 300 E. Third. Tickets: $25. Call 859-280-2218 or go to lexingtonlyric.tix.com.

cruising with lake street dive

lake street dive: mike olson, rachael price, bridget kinney and mike calabrese. photo by danny clinch.

You can have the best players, the sharpest singers and the keenest songs. The members of Lake Street Dive can attest, as they are in clear possession of all that. But in the end, nothing really matters if the band chemistry isn’t there.

For the Boston bred quartet, an underlying friendship not only formed the foundation of a buoyantly infectious sound rooted in pop, rock and soul essentials. It has also grounded Lake Street Dive as it worked its way from dingy bars (like the one in Minneapolis the band is named for) to prestigious concert halls around the world.

“Yeah, we were friends long before we were any good at making music together,” said Rachael Price, whose commanding vocal presence is the catalyst of Lake Street Dive’s huge, celebratory sound. “The friendship was what actually propelled us forward because we got along so well.

“I mean, we have generally always enjoyed each other’s individual musicianship and what each of us brought to the table. But it takes a lot to figure out how all those elements work together. The chemistry among us personally has always been really, really stellar. There has always been a familial vibe between us. It’s been that way since the beginning, really, and has only gotten stronger. But we’ve worked on that, too.

“It felt sometimes like we were spending more time as business partners that we were on our friendships. That when we decided, ‘Let’s make sure we’re honoring our friendships as well as what we can do to keep this whole operation running.”

Though Lake Street Dive came together in 2004 while Price, bassist Bridget Kearney, guitarist and trumpeter Mike Olson and drummer Mike Calabrese were attending the New England Conservatory of Music, an ensemble commitment to working as a full time troupe came much later.

“We’ve been a band for 12 years but have been a serious, working band for about four,” Price said. “Only a couple of years before that could we have said, ‘Yes, we have a sound.’ Prior to that, it was complete exploration. I mean, we still don’t know exactly the type music that we play. But it was, like, this really weird exploration for the first handful of years. We were just throwing darts at the musical board and trying anything.

“No one was writing songs in a specific way. No one was playing in a specific way. There was just a love of The Beatles and Motown and music from that time. That was what started gearing us in that direction and applying the treatment of that type of music to the songs we were writing.”

Among the first signs of national infatuation was a 2012 youtube video of the band gathered around a single street corner microphone singing a decidedly bluesy version of the Jackson 5 hit “I Want You Back.” A year later the band was at New York’s Town Hall performing as part as the all-star, T Bone Burnett-curated “Another Day, Another Time” concert. Criticial acclaim began to pour in with the release of 2014’s “Bad Self Portraits” album and the rigorous touring and plentiful television exposure that followed. The Dave Cobb-produced “Side Pony” album solidified Lake Street Dive’s star status in 2016 as both a recording and touring act.

“For me, singing is one the purest forms of artistic expression,” Price said. “I don’t play an instrument with any proficiency, but I think singing is a very, very quick and direct way to the human heart. For me, personally, it’s also the most direct way to reflect what my own feelings are. I’ve always felt the most like myself and at the most peace with myself when I’m singing. Sometimes, I might be, ‘I don’t know what I feel.’ But if I’m singing, that’s like how I want things to be.

“I started singing when I was pretty young and fell in love with jazz – specifically, Ella Fitzgerald. This was when I was five or six. I would listen to her constantly and copied everything she did. That set me on a path of doing that with a lot of singers. Then I got heavily into soul music. Honestly, even at five, I’m pretty sure I would have told you, ‘I’m just going to be a singer.’ That’s all I ever wanted to do.”

Lake Street Dive performs at 8 p.m. Feb. 28 at Manchester Music Hall, 899 Manchester. Tickets are $20 in advance, $23 day of show. Call 859-537-7321 or go to ticketfly.com.

back into the blues game

lil’ john burton. photo by timothy duffy.

The mission of the Music Maker Relief Foundation has long been to preserve the blues-roots traditions of the South. That includes assisting the musicians from the region that have helped cultivate those sounds through the decades.

Trombonist Lil’ John Burton, who doubles as emcee for the long-running Music Maker Blues Revue, is among those artists even though he hails from an entirely different Southern region – specifically, the Southside of Chicago. But it was a lifelong pursuit, even when playing with blues icons like Junior Wells and B.B. King, to head to the real South where the blues, and Music Maker, took root.

“I came up in the projects in Chicago, so it was a little rough,” said Burton, who will perform with the Music Maker Blues Revue tonight at the Norton Center for the Arts in Danville. “The idea was to get the hell out of there. So my mother had me play the horn as a deterrent, to be out of the gangs.

“Because I was a little kid then, when I got out of school, I would take the horn and go to the candy store. I’d be playing for my schoolmates and the candy man would give me candy for pay. I thought, ‘Oh, wow.’ Then as I got older and older, the candy turned to money. After that, I never looked back.”

Upon relocating to Atlanta nearly 20 years ago, Burton teamed with Music Maker, the North Carolina-based organization whose intent on enforcing Southern blues tradition meant locating a generation of musicians whose careers – and, quite often, lives – had been forgotten.

“They give everybody a platform when they wouldn’t normally have one,” Burton said. “Some of the musicians have fallen on bad times and haven’t recorded in years. Music Maker gives them the opportunity to, as they say, get back into the game.”

That involved the formation of the Music Maker Blues Revue, a rotating lineup of players whose credits includes tenure with Ray Charles, Clarence Carter, Bo Diddley and many others. The ensemble has given Music Maker its most visible performance presence outside of the South. The organization has also undertaken ways of financially assisting these players in day-to-day needs, from assisting with healthcare to helping with housing and basic transportation. For Burton, that meant helping cover the costs of hip replacement surgery.

“Yes, they did. Yes, they surely did. We’re looking out for a friend of ours now. His name is Eddie Tigner. He’s been with Music Maker quite a long time and is 90 years old. He was supposed to come to Kentucky with us, but he’s not able to because of an illness that keeps him from traveling. But he’s one of the superstars of Music Maker (Tigner’s diverse resume runs from work with blues pioneer Elmore James to the vintage vocal group The Ink Spots). He’s here in Atlanta now, so Music Maker takes good care of him. Everybody is looked after at Music Maker. Everybody.”

As emcee of the Revue as well as one of its performing members, Burton takes pride of introducing his fellow blues journeymen to audiences throughout the United States and Europe.

“I love having that responsibility because I do feel like I’m guiding the train. It’s wonderful to introduce these great, great musicians each night. It’s an honor and a privilege. I get such a thrill out of introducing them and then listening to them just explode like they do onstage.

“It’s a pleasure because these Music Maker artists are phenomenal. They didn’t just get to this point. They have years and years of experience and all have real kind hearts. They’re all really beautiful people, so we have a good time together. We’re like a big family.”

The Music Maker Blues Revue performs at 8 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Weisiger Theatre of the Norton Center for the Arts, 600 W. Walnut St. in Danville. Tickets: $20-$28. Call 877-448-7469, 859-236-4692 or go to nortoncenter.com.

hal ketchum: country dreamer

hal ketchum. photo by john lacker.

Songs aren’t always finite things to Hal Ketchum. A major presence on country radio during the 1990s through hits like “Small Town Saturday Night,” “Hearts Are Gonna Roll” and “Mama Knows the Highway,” he says his compositions don’t always come from real world inspirations – or even the real world, for that matter.

“Sometimes, I dream these things,” said Ketchum, who performs Thursday at Willie’s Locally Known. “They literally just come in a dream form, but it’s been really, really fantastic to explore the options. At the same time, there is no such thing as a song that’s finished. They can take a while to write but the more you play them, the more you’ve just got to let them go.”

Today, Ketchum operates outside of country music convention as an indie artist whose music gains as much admiration from Americana audiences as the Nashville mainstream. Similarly, his itinerary isn’t of full band concerts. The bulk of his touring schedule, including his Lexington performance, leans to stripped down duo presentations with longtime guitarist Kenny Grimes

“I used to travel with a full band and it just wasn’t very cost effective. So it’s really nice to do this with Kenny. He’s my best friend. We’ve been doing this for 35 years. Working with him has just been fantastic.”

Ketchum does have a new album to showcase titled “I’m the Troubadour.” But the big news isn’t so much that the record is his first full studio work since 2008 or his first release after a 17 year alliance with Curb Records. No, the headline here is that there is new music from Ketchum at all.

Following the release of 2008’s “Father Time” album, Ketchum was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, a spinal cord inflammation that brought paralysis and a near end to any kind of career.

“I was paralyzed from the neck down,” he said. “I was blind. So I moved to New Mexico, to Santa Fe. I rented a little adobe casita and just had to really work everything out. I had no feeling in my arms, so I had to learn to play guitar again. It was pretty tough for awhile.

“But I’m like the Black Knight,” he said, alluding to the character in “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” whose loses both legs and arms in a battle but refuses to concede defeat. “It was only a flesh wound.”

Today, Ketchum resides again in the Hill Country of Texas. A native of Greenwich, New York, he moved to the Austin region in the early ‘80s before his escalating career took him to Nashville the following decade.

“I grew up in upstate New York, so I’m a Yankee by birth but a Texan by choice,” Ketchum said. “Today, I live in paradise. This place we bought – five acres on a hill in Comal County… I mean, the sunrises and the sunsets here are all just absolutely magical. I feel really happy.”

Musical lifetimes spent in Texas and Tennessee might suggest Ketchum’s prime musical inspirations hailed from the world of country music. He is quick to point out otherwise.

“I have three musical heroes – Van Morrison, Van Morrison and Van Morrison. He’s truly the most creative man I’ve ever met.

“I got to do a show with him. We were playing Dublin one time in a pub and it was absolutely incredible. When I was soundchecking, I was playing ‘I Miss My Mary’ (an original composition from Ketchum’s 1991 album “Past the Point of Rescue”) and he just stood there and listened. He’s a very engaging guy. He said, ‘Did you write that song?’ I said, ‘Yes sir, I did.’ We got along so well. It was fascinating. He’s absolutely my hero.”

Though he is proud of his hitmaking career, Ketchum said he feels little kinship to the country music emanating from Nashville today.

“I think it’s pretty much a wasteland. It’s just a bunch of tailwagging. I sound like a crotchety old man, I know, but I’m not impressed with it at all.

“But I still feel very creative and very much alive with what I’m doing. I just celebrated 25 years of being a member of the Grand Ole Opry, so I’m just very blessed to be doing what I do for a living. It’s all good, man.”

Hal Ketchum performs at 8:30 p.m. Feb. 23 at Willie’s Locally Known, 286 Southland Drive. Tickets: $30. Call 859-281-1116 or go to willieslocallyknown.com.

a solo shade of moody blue

justin hayward.

Ever since the strains of “Nights in White Satin” defined the progressive sound of late night radio a half century ago, the pop world has known the name Justin Hayward. More generally, they knew he helped establish The Moody Blues. But it was Hayward’s voice, guitar and pen that summoned many of the group’s other established works, including, “Tuesday Afternoon,” “Lovely to See You,” “The Story in Your Eyes” and many others.

But here’s a fact even some of the Moodys’ most ardent fans don’t know. For 40 of Hayward’s 50 years with the group, he has also maintained a solo career, focusing on tunes that are lighter in tone and more personal in narrative.

“In the early days, I did hold some songs back that I didn’t think were kind of appropriate or a decent fit for the Moodys,” said Hayward, who makes his first Lexington appearance since 1994 on Tuesday at the Opera House. “It’s okay being personal, but sometimes it’s good to be… well, not deliberately obscure, but working in a place where you try and make a song more about a general emotion instead of a specific one. There are a couple of things on this tour that I probably held back from recording with the Moodys because they were a bit too me-me-me and not us-us-us.”

That’s not to say Hayward tucks the familiar Moody Blues tunes in a closet when he tours on his own. In fact, the repertoire this winter is being split between his vintage hits and solo career songs, many of which have been compiled on a new Hayward anthology recording called “All the Way.”

“It was a bit daunting, to be quite honest,” Hayward said of his solo career’s launch with the 1977 album “Songwriter.” “The people I met during that time were very precious to me. The musicians I worked with are still my friends today. It was kind of scary, but there was so much good will that I found. I didn’t find the world saying, ‘When are the Moodys going to get back together?’ I found a world that was welcoming to me and people that said, ‘I’ve just always liked your songs.’ It was as simple as that.”

The mix of Moody Blues and solo material at Tuesday’s show will play out not in a band setting, but in a trio configuration that will team Hayward with British guitarist Mike Dawes (who will also open the concert) and keyboardist/vocalist Julie Ragins.

“With this band, you can hear every nuance of the sound. I get a chance to bring my acoustic guitars, the ones that were used the records. It’s a little bit more like the original recordings, in some ways – particularly the early recordings where (producer) Tony Clarke and (engineer) Derek Varnals would put the acoustic guitar much further forward and the drums further back in the mix. The acoustic guitar and the mellotron often led the Moodys’ early recordings. It’s a little bit more like that.

“I mean, I’m very lucky to still have the Moodys. I love every moment of it. But this tour, without that volume, is like being in my music room, like being with friends. That’s how these songs were written, including the parts that I put on all my original demos. It’s how they originally sounded. It’s how the songs were born.”

So what drives Hayward in 2017? He turned 70 in October and still maintains a hearty touring schedule of solo dates and Moody Blues shows. What keeps his performance attitude so full of vigor?

“Well, that’s the question, isn’t it? There are some things I don’t have to deal with that others might. I don’t have to deal with celebrity. I don’t have to deal with paparazzi or that kind of stuff. I’m spared that. I can be just the guy walking down the street. But these songs, a lot of them mean something in peoples’ lives just as songs of other artists do in mine. And, really, what else would I do?

“My daughter tells me, ‘Look, you have a lovely house. You love reading books, why don’t we go there and just read books for the rest of our lives?’ And I thought, ‘Yeah, that’s a nice idea. And? What about this other thing I have to do?”

Justin Hayward withMike Dawes perform at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 14 at the Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short. Tickets: $55.50, $65.50. Call 800-745-3000, 859-233-3535 or go ticketmaster.com.

webb wilder rocks on

webb wilder.

Leave it to Webb Wilder to perfect the art of singing in the shower – or, at least, realizing when such an activity can be best optimized on a record.

At the close of his “Missississpi Moderne” album, Wilder’s newest sampler of typically varied roots rock delicacies, the veteran Nashville-by-way-of-Hattiesburg songster includes a version of the blues chestnut “Stones in My Passway” that was recorded in purposely primitive conditions – specifically, on a hand held recorder in the shower. Wilder never intended it for professional or public release, but the ultra lo-fi result proved a fitting way to open and close the album.

“It was pretty silly,” Wilder said of his “Stones” realization. “I will go to my grave reserving the right to be silly.

“Look, I am from Mississippi and if I grow up in an Afro-Celtic culture, I like to think I can do that sort of thing with as much soul as the next guy. But that was never meant to be released. It was kind of a ‘Ha ha, listen to this’ deal. I made that thing up in the shower in the mid 90s. I call it ‘hand held’ because I recorded it on a hand held cassette recorder. We wound up putting it on the multi-track. Tom Comet, our bass player, had the idea of putting just a little snippet of it at the beginning, so the album is bookended by it.”

Mixing rootsy drive and authority with a discreet level of giddiness has pretty much been the modus operandi for Wilder over the last three decades. Wilder the musician actually grew out of Wilder the hip ‘50s private eye character created for an indie short film. But ever since the release of his debut album, 1986’s “It Came From Nashville,” Wilder’s askew but devout roots music – which regularly incorporates rock, rockabilly, country, surf, swing, blues, soul and more – has remained vibrant.

“For a lot of us, music is our core,” Wilder said. “It’s our spirituality. To be a musician is a lifelong pursuit. Ahead of everything else in life, it’s a pretty nutty thing to do. So the only people who really do it are people who are unable to not do it. It’s like a calling. So I was born into music apparently.

“I was in the fourth grade when the Beatles spearheaded the British invasion. I think for a lot of us, it just meant the world. It meant, ‘This is the new world. This is how it is.’ The Beatles were in a category by themselves. On one album, they would have a Broadway show tune, a Chuck Berry song and something they wrote.

“By the time I started making records, that’s not what record companies wanted you to do. They wanted you to have a sound and that was what you were. Well, I’m sorry. I like rhythm and blues. I like country. I like blues. I like rock ‘n’ roll. I like British rock ‘n’ roll. I like American rock ‘n’ roll. I like rockabilly. I like cowboy songs. But I also can’t be a play-it-just-like-the-record duplicator of any of it, so all of it does come though my filter. Hopefully the ‘me’ element does unify it. The challenge comes from focusing the eclecticism.

Outside of a few brushes with major label exposure (as on the 1989 Island Records release “Hybrid Vigor,” whose title still nicely sums up the cross-genre joy of his music), Wilder has essentially been an indie artist, touring clubs and theatres with workmanlike regularity while maintaining a celebratory mood that has not dissipated through the years.

“I don’t know what it is that fuels my particular approach to performing, but I think my default setting is that of a performer as much as a writer or recording artist. Live is sort of my element so I like a level of spontaneity to be there.

“I get stage nerves and I have nervous energy, so, yeah, there’s some kind of it’s-really-who-you-are thing going on there. You really mean it and you’re pretty serious about it even if you’re being humorous or whatever. When it clicks, you’re lost in it and it’s more a feeling than thinking thing and you’re surfing six inches off the ground. Hopefully when you’re not, you’re up for the task enough to where no one notices.”

Webb Wilder and the Beatnecks perform at 9 p.m. Feb. 10 at Willie’s Locally Known, 286 Southland Dr. Admission: $10. Call 859-281-1116 or go to willieslocallyknown.com.

hector del curto: torchbearer of tango

hector del curto.

The chance to play with an artistic idol brought Hector del Curto to a crossroads early in his career.

The opportunity involved a performance with Astor Piazzolla, an artist who was far more than an inspiration for the young Argentine instrumentalist. Piazzolla was also the new generation pioneer in both the tango sounds that captivated de Curto’s homeland during his youth and the instrument that helped provide the music with its voice, the bandoneon.

The trouble was Piazzolla was considered a musical heretic by many Argentine traditionalists, including del Curto’s father, who viewed the composer’s modernization of tango, the aptly dubbed “nuevo tango,” as artistic blasphemy for its inclusion of jazz and classical accents.

So in essence, playing with his hero in 1989 (three years before Piazzolla’s death) meant del Curto had to distance himself from an established artistic practice of his culture and his family.

“At the time, with my father being a traditionalist, Piazzolla was simply not allowed,” said del Curto, who will perform two Piazzolla works on Friday with the Lexington Philharmonic. “Like many other people in Argentina, he did not accept the music of Astor Piazzolla. So when I performed with him, there were many mixed feelings.

“People talked about him, saying Piazzolla destroyed tango. But then I saw him onstage and how he put his personality into his music. Not only was his music very sophisticated and very developed. What made Piazzolla was his personality. That was something huge. You heard his life. That marked me for how I should proceed into the music. It’s not about trying to sound like this person or trying to write like that person. It’s about how you combine all the elements that you learn and the experience that you have with your own personality and how you convey that.”

For del Curto, a fascination with Piazzolla began in his teens while performing traditional tango music in the orchestra of Osvaldo Pugilese. Taken by a performance by Piazzolla’s Sexteto Nuevo Tango, he formed a quartet named after a Piazzolla piece that seemed that sum up the temperament of his new idol and the dramatic musical variations he was designing – Revolucionario.

“Tango was my language, but Piazzolla added his knowledge of jazz and classical. At that age, I was still developing my technique, so there were technical challenges built into his music, as well.”

For the sparse but potently emotive “Oblivion,” one of the Piazzolla works del Curto will play with the Philharmonic, the challenges are established and then pursued on the bandoneon, the concertina-like instrument that has long defined tango.

“The challenge is every time that you play a slow piece, where there are very few notes, that’s when you have to show your personality and your understanding of the music. If you have a lot of notes, you can show your virtuosity but not so much in a slow piece.

“The bandoneon is the main instrument on the piece. It’s not a percussive instrument. You can hold the notes and create different colors. That’s one of the main attractions of a piece like that – all this space that happens between one note and the other to create different emotions. An artist like Astor Piazzolla was able to simplify the music to where only the most important notes made up the piece, but those notes create many colors and many emotions. Nothing is wasted in the notes. Each note is very important and each note can be made beautiful. There are so many possibilities in a piece like this.”

Tonight’s Philharmonic concert won’t be the first time del Curto has performed in Central Kentucky. In 2014, he played Danville as a member of the Pablo Ziegler Quartet. Ziegler was Piazzolla’s pianist during the last decade of the latter’s performance career. Zigeler’s ongoing alliance with del Curto is now in its 26th year, even though the bandoneon artist performs regularly with his own group and released his second album as a bandleader, “Eternal Piazzolla,” in 2013.

“For my instrument, it’s very important to participate in all these different projects. Sometimes, people can be reluctant to include the bandoneon in different kinds of music. But the instrument can blend so well. It has such a unique voice.”

Lexington Philharmonic with Hector del Curto perform at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 10 at the, Singletary Center for the Arts 405 Rose St. Tickets: $25-$75. Call 859-233-4226 or go to lexphil.org

the price sisters catch a break

leanna and lauren price. photo by amy richmond.

It wasn’t an expected way to spend spring break.

With a sizeable quotient of collegiate America setting their sights on sunny Florida, Lauren and Leanna Price had in mind a destination that wasn’t so far down the interstate, although the sense of adventure their journey promised was considerable. The twin siblings, now established professionally as The Price Sisters, devoted their week off to cutting a self-titled seven song EP in Nashville with some of bluegrass music’s most respected names.

“We went down to Nashville for the week, recorded it and released it at the end of August in 2016, which was when we started our senior year of school,” mandolinist/vocalist Lauren said. “Since then, we’ve been thinking about the next album, actually – a full length album that we are ready to record at some point this spring.”

The EP makes for an astonishing listen because its traditional slant, especially evident in the beautifully antique vocal harmonies, suggests an almost sage-like confidence one might not anticipate from a pair of 22 year old college seniors. You hear echoes of the Carter Family within the chestnut “What Does the Deep Sea Say” (the duo has often acknowledged its fondness for Doc Watson’s popular version of the tune), although the singing is just as authentic and authoritative during Marshal Warwick’s waltz-flavored “It’s Happening Again,” the EP’s lone contemporary entry.

“We really started singing – trying to sing harmony, anyway – when we were about 10 or 11,” said fiddler/vocalist Leanna. “Our parents always sang together and knew how to harmonize with each other. A love of music ran through our family from both sides. We could be part of it if dad was singing lead or our mom was singing harmony. Over time, that sound just came to us because it was what we were used to hearing.”

Though the Ohio born sisters’ fascination for bluegrass was a proud product of family environment, what has helped nurture the music they have created on their own was a transfer from Davis & Elkins College in Elkins, West Va. to the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music at Morehead State University.

“We were playing a festival in Rosine, Ky. (birthplace of bluegrass patriarch Bill Monroe),” Lauren said. “At the time we were students at Davis & Elkins College but ended up stopping in Morehead at the Music Center to practice with a guy who was going to play banjo with us. He turned out to be a student in the program.

“Up to that point, we never really had that feeling you get whenever you visit a school and just know it’s right. But when we walked into the Center, something was really different.”

Part of the school’s spark came from Center director Raymond McLain’s history as part of a long prestigious family ensemble (The McLain Family Band) and his recognition of similar artistic kinship with the Price Sisters.

“We have always loved to sing with each other,” Leanna said, “and everyone at the Center appreciates that. Raymond comes from a family of music so he knows what that’s like. He is totally supportive. He understands we’ve always been together musically and that singing together is really what we like to do the most.”

The Price Sisters’ EP, the duo’s first release for the acclaimed bluegrass label Rebel Records, also sports guest appearances by Ronnie McCoury and Alan Bartram (of The Del McCoury Band and The Travelin’ McCourys), bassist Mike Bub (a McCoury Band alum), Charlie Cushman (The Dukes of Leicester) and Mike Benson (formerly of Special Consensus).

“These are some of the musicians we have looked up to and admired,” Lauren said. “I’ve been listening to Ronnie McCoury’s playing since I was little. But they were so nice to us and so helpful. It was such a treat to hear some of my favorite musicians in the booth next to us recording and then having that come out on our record. It was very cool.”

But will the experience of cutting the Price Sisters’ first full length album prove to be equally cool?

“It’s one of those bittersweet moments in a lot of ways with graduation coming up and things like that,” Lauren said. “But it will also be something really new. It’s a big step, but we’re looking forward to it. I think everything is going to turn out great.”

The Price Sisters perform for Red Barn Radio at ArtsPlace Performance Hall, 161 North Mill at 8 p.m. Feb. 8. Tickets: $8. For more info, go to redbarnradio.com.

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