Archive for CentrePointe

in performance: de novo dahl

Right about the time this afternoon’s July 4th parade took a literally freakish turn down Main Street with the costumed pageantry of a haunted house exhibit that included a few audience friendly zombies and a monster rabbit, Nashville’s De Novo Dahl blasted off with a pop party of its own merry design at Phoenix Park.

The band had costumed appeal, too. The five members were decked out (as in the above photo) like hip jailbirds in matching outfits of yellow and red stripes. But the colors that beamed from its ultra-fun 45 minute set were considerably more varied.

The show opening Dance Like David and Sky is Falling set the mood with glowing keyboard figures, plump percussive beats (especially on the latter tune) and a stylistic view that, from the cheery harmonies of Joel J. Dahl and Serai Zaffiro to the music’s abundant melodic hooks, borrowed liberally from past pop decades.

The Funk, on the other hand, was a miniature ‘70s dance party that opened with a disco-savvy bounce that sent keyboardist Matt Hungate briefly out into the greens to indulge in some moves before the band wound its way through melodies that better approximated vintage Brit-pop.

Covers of the 1981 synth-savvy Rod Stewart hit Young Turks and the Speed Racer theme (where the “go, go, go” chorus packed a Ramones-ish punch) completed the holiday mood as the sun made a cameo appearance on an otherwise overcast 4th.

A side note: one had to wonder why the demolition this week of the Triple Crown Lounge, the newest casualty of the proposed CentrePointe project, couldn’t have been completed or simply delayed until after a holiday event that brought thousands of patrons downtown.

So, as the parade looped around Vine to Main and De Novo Dahl rocked away across the street in Phoenix Park, audiences were provided with the inescapable backdrop of a blown apart street corner that looked like it had been hit by mortar shells. Who came up with that bright idea?

the dame's last stop: cowtown

In order to appreciate the current game plan of Hot Club of Cowtown, you have to review some previous box scores.

First, there was the dispersal. After seven years, five albums and who-knows-how-many performances, the Austin, Tx. trio, designed as a nexus between the ‘30s and ‘40s Western swing adventures of Bob Wills and the pre-World War II “hot jazz” pioneered in Europe by guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli in the Quintette du Hot Club de France, disbanded.

But when Cowtown fiddler Elana James later hit the road to support a self-titled debut album, she thought of no finer guitar foil for her band that longtime Cowtown mate Whit Smith. When James’ bassist then relocated to Chicago, she signed up stringman Jake Erwin, who just happened to be the bass player on Hot Club’s final two albums.

Then the realization hit. The very band James had on the road was the very Cowtown lineup that busted up in the first place.

“We had been playing together, the three of us, under my name for nearly a year,” James said. “After awhile, it was like, ‘We should call ourselves what we really are.”

Thus began what she terms “the re-launching” of Hot Club of Cowtown, which James and Smith first formed in 1997.

“It’s a rare thing for the three of us to have musically developed when and where and how we did,” Smith said. “Somewhere in all of that there was just a connection. We were coming from more of the same place than just the fact we have a lot of the same records.”

While relentless touring in the wake of 2002′s Ghost Train album yielded a high spirited concert recording (2003′s Continental Stomp), it also saw friction in the band ranks. But the resulting split came without any lasting animosity.

“We got to the bottom of everybody’s character and saw that we still liked each other,” James said.

The reconvened Hot Club of Cowtown returns to Lexington tonight to serve as the final band to play The Dame. The trio will stay over to perform for the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour on Monday.

Then on August 19, the Shout Factory label will release a 20-song anthology assembled from the band’s five Hightone albums. Aptly titled The Best of the Hot Club of Cowtown, the album is a mix of originals (Smith’s Emily, James’ Secret of Mine), standards (Stardust), swing favorites (the Wills staple Ida Red) and global string summits (Fuli Tschai). There is also a Ghost Town cover of the ‘70s-era Aerosmith obscurity Chip Away the Stone that wraps three part harmonies around Smith’s guitar/vocal lead.

“I always think you should be allowed play the music you like,” Smith said. “We’re very lucky in that we get to do that. Some people get so tired of the material they’re forced to play. I mean, could you imagine writing Margaritaville and then having to play it every night?”

A new studio album for 2009 is also in the works. While it will feature predominantly original music, the Cowtown crew has already recorded another intriguing cover: Tom Waits’ Orphans nugget Long Way Home.

“The thing that’s cool is we don’t really sound like anybody,” James said. “We don’t sound like Stephane Grappelli. We don’t sound like Bob Wills. We’ve been inspired by that stuff, but we’re not aping it at all. This is a band with a sound of its own

“Whether we’re playing an Aerosmith song or a ballad by the Hot Club of France, to have consistent character throughout the music is something I’m very proud of.”

(above, The Hot Club of Cowtown: bassist/vocalist Jake Erwin, fiddler/vocalist Elana James, guitarist/vocalist Whit Smith)

The Hot Club of Cowtown performs at 8 tonight with The Swells for the last night of downtown business at The Dame, 156 West Main. $7. (859) 226-9005.

Hot Club also plays at 7 p.m. Monday with Takeharu Kunimoto and the Last Frontier for the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour at the Kentucky Theatre, 214 E. Main St. $10. (859) 252-8888.

These were among incidents received by the Montgomery County Police Department

The Washington Post April 21, 2011 These were among incidents received by the Montgomery County Police Department. For information, call 240-773-5030.

Crime Solvers of Montgomery County, a nonprofit community organization, pays up to $1,000 for information leading to an arrest and indictment in connection with these and any other felony crimes. Call the 24-hour hot line at 800-673-2777. Callers may remain anonymous.

Virginia Ave., 200 block, 10 p.m. April 2. During an argument at a residence, a man threatened a female acquaintance at knifepoint. The woman was able to escape unharmed.

Hungerford Dr., 200 block, 6:40 p.m. April 1. Five males on a pedestrian bridge at a Metro station attacked two pedestrians and demanded cash, then fled with a cellphone stolen from one of the victims. Four males ages, 14, 15, 15, and 16, and a Silver Spring male, 17, were arrested.

Rockville Pike, 700 block, 3:45 p.m. April 3. Two males robbed a male talking on a cellphone of cash at knifepoint, then fled in a black Jeep.

Beauvoir Blvd., 17500 block, 8:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. April 5. Property and cash were stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Crossfield Ct., 51000 block, 11:30 p.m. April 4 to 1:30 p.m. April 5. A Global Positioning System device was stolen from a vehicle entered by force.

Dewey Rd., 11500 block, 7 to 11 p.m. April 2. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Dewey Rd., 12000 block, 3:25 a.m. April 3. An attempt was made to enter a residence by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Dufief Mill Rd., 14900 block, 3:20 a.m. April 4. An attempt was made to enter a community club and pool by breaking glass in a door. Nothing was reported missing.

England Terr., 200 block, 4:10 p.m. March 30 to 7:05 a.m. March 31. An attempt was made to enter a residence by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Holland Rd., 5900 block, 4:28 to 4:34 a.m. March 30. A residence was entered by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Horners Lane N., 500 block, 10:08 p.m. March 31. Property was stolen from a market entered by force. An employee confronted and detained an intruder. A 17-year-old male was arrested.

Lewis Ave., 1400 block, 8:24 p.m. April 2. A man confronted near a shed in the back yard of a residence fled empty-handed. A 25-year- old man was arrested nearby.

Montgomery Ave. W., 100 block, 4 p.m. April 1 to 11:45 a.m. April 2. An attempt was made to enter a museum gift shop by breaking glass in a front door. Nothing was reported missing.

Muncaster Mill Rd., 7200 block, 4 p.m. March 29 to noon March 30. A vacant building was entered by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Potomac Oaks Dr., 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. March 31. A residence was entered by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Ridgeway Ave., 5700 block, 4:10 a.m. March 30. A residence was entered by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Rockville Pike, 12200 block, 3 to 3:30 p.m. April 4. A wallet was stolen from a shopper’s purse in a store.

Schuylkill Rd., 11300 block, 6 a.m. March 31 to 12:30 p.m. April 1. A residence was entered by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Schuylkill Rd., 11400 block, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. March 30. A residence was entered by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Settlers Landing Ct., 1 to 100 block, 12:43 p.m. March 30. A residence was entered by forcing the front door. Nothing was reported missing.

Treble Ct., 10100 block, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. March 31. Property and cash were stolen from a residence entered by force.

Village Square Terr., 12500 block, 10 a.m. April 4 to 11:30 a.m. April 5. A GPS device and a set of car tools were among property stolen from a vehicle entered by force.

Watts Branch Pkwy., 600 block, March 30. Property and cash were stolen from a residence entered by force.

Watts Branch Pkwy., 600 block, March 30. A break-in occurred at a residence. Nothing was reported missing. There was no sign of forced entry.

Watts Branch Pkwy., 600 block, March 30. An attempt was made to enter a residence by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Loblolly Terr., 14000 block, 12:01 a.m. to 5:41 p.m. April 1. A gold-colored 2002 Mercedes was stolen from a garage at a residence.

Democracy Blvd., 6400 block, 11:10 a.m. March 30. A man exposed himself in the children’s area of a library.

Connecticut Ave., 10500 block, 12:15 p.m. April 1. A man giving an acquaintance a ride stopped at a grocery store, then attacked the passenger and demanded his wallet and cellphone. Passersby helped the victim escape the car unharmed.

Farragut Ave., 3700 block, 1 p.m. March 31. Two men threatened to shoot bank employees, then robbed a teller area of cash and fled on foot. No weapon was seen. No injuries were reported.

Lyttonsville Rd., 2400 block, 11:30 p.m. April 4. Two men robbed a man of a wallet and his pants.

Bradley Blvd., 4700 block, April 3 to 4. GPS units were stolen from two of three vehicles entered by breaking windows.

Bywood Lane, 4400 block, 12:45 to 3 p.m. March 31. An attempt was made to enter a residence by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Clifford Ave., 8800 block, 1:30 to 3:45 p.m. March 31. An attempt was made to enter a residence by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Dunlop St., 3600 block, April 1 to 2. Power tools were stolen from a home under construction entered by removing plywood.

Edson Lane, 5900 block, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 31. An attempt was made to enter a residence by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Glenbrook Rd., 6700 block, 3 to 6:30 p.m. March 28. An attempt was made to enter a residence. Nothing was reported missing.

Helmsdale Rd., 7500 block, 12:30 p.m. March 31. Two males banged on the front door of an occupied residence, then forced it open. When confronted, the intruders fled empty-handed to a vehicle. website escape the car

Rosedale Ave., 4600 block, April 1 to 2. Tools were stolen from a residence under construction entered by breaking glass in a back door.

Searl Terr., 5900 block, March 29 to 30. Cash and property were stolen from a residence entered by force.

Westbard Ave., 5300 block, March 29 to 30. Property and cash were stolen from a gas station entered by force.

Wisconsin Ave., 5400 block, April 2 to 5. Property was stolen from one of two businesses entered by force.

Wisconsin Ave., 5700 block, 5 to 10:30 p.m. April 2. An attempt was made to enter an office by forcing a door. Nothing was reported missing.

Colesville Rd. and Second Ave., 8:38 p.m. April 3. A group of males attacked a 17-year-old male with a baseball bat. The victim was treated for severe head and leg injuries. Police believe that it was a gang-related incident.

Kennett and 13th streets, 8000 block, 6:40 p.m. March 29. A man was shot in the arm by a pellet gun. The victim, who was working in the area at the time of the incident, said that he heard several shots hit a nearby building. At 7:20 p.m. April 4, a man was shot in the arm with a pellet gun while he stood near a motel room. Police said that in both incidents a weapon was fired from a nearby high- rise apartment building.

Carson Dr., 14700 block, 3:25 p.m. March 30. Three males threatened a female and robbed her of an iPod.

Columbia Pike, 11400 block, 9:06 a.m. April 4. A gunman robbed an armored-car driver as he left a bank, then fled in a blue Chevrolet Cavalier.

Georgia Ave., 8700 block, 3:45 p.m. March 29. Five males attacked two male teenagers and fled with a camcorder. No serious injuries were reported.

Georgia Ave. and Blair Mill Rd., 2:30 p.m. March 31. Three males attacked a man, pushed him against a wall and robbed him of cash. Police saw the assailants running from the scene. Three District males, ages 15, 16 and 22, were arrested.

Allerton Lane, 12100 block, 1 a.m. April 3 to 8:50 a.m. April 4. A residence was entered by breaking a front window. Nothing was reported missing.

Barron St., 8600 block, 9:10 p.m. April 1. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Castle Blvd., 13800 block, 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. March 31. Cash and property were stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Hampshire West Ct., 1500 block, 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 30. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Luzerne Ave., 2000 block, 6 to 9 p.m. March 30. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Malibu Dr., 800 block, 6:30 to 7 p.m. March 30. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Thayer Ave., 800 block, 1:30 to 6 p.m. March 29. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Wheaton Woods Park area, 4:30 a.m. April 2. A man broke a window and entered a residence, then chased a woman from the house into the back yard, where he sexually assaulted her. The victim was able to break free and escape to a neighbor’s house.

Georgia and University Avenues, 5:38 p.m. April 4. Two women followed a woman getting off a bus, then attacked her and robbed her of a wallet and cellphone. No serious injuries were reported.

New Hampshire Ave., 13300 block, 1:40 p.m. April 4. A man threatened a gas station employee at knifepoint, then fled with cash from the cash register. A Burtonsville man, 22, was arrested.

Glenmont Cir., 2300 block, March 29 to April 1. A break-in occurred at a residence. Nothing was reported missing.

New Hampshire Ave., 10100 block, 1:42 to 7:15 a.m. April 4. A restaurant was entered by force. Nothing was reported missing.

Olney Sandy Spring Rd., 500 block, 9 p.m. April 4 to 5:30 a.m. April 5. Cash was stolen from a gas station entered by force.

Snowbird Terr., 2700 block, 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. March 30. Cash and property were stolen from a residence entered by force.

Valleywood Dr., 12100 block, 7 to 10:50 p.m. April 1. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Clopper Rd., 13500 block, 3:08 a.m. April 1. Two men who implied that they were armed with a handgun robbed a convenience store of property.

Churubusco Lane, 19300 block, 8:40 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. March 28. Property was stolen from a residence entered by force.

Forest Brook Ct., 100 block, April 2 to 3. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Nickleby Dr., 24700 block, 6:45 a.m. to 3:21 p.m. April 1. Property was stolen from a residence entered by force.

Sugarland Rd., 15500 block, 4 to 6:30 p.m. April 1. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Tilford Ct., 13400 block, 3:40 a.m. April 1. A vehicle break-in occurred. A 24-year-old man was arrested.

Wanegarden Dr., 13800 block, 7:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. March 30. Property was stolen from a residence entered by force.

Waterside Cir., 13300 block, 3:18 p.m. April 4. Property was stolen from a residence entered by force. A 26-year-old Rockville man and a 22-year-old Silver Spring man were arrested.

Tilford Way,19200 block, 4:10 a.m. April 3. A red Saturn was stolen from a residence that had been entered by force. Property was also stolen from the residence.

Frederick Ave. N.,400 block, 9 p.m. April 1. A man was attacked outside a fast-food restaurant. No serious injuries were reported.

Bannister Lane, 9000 block, 9:25 p.m. April 1. A man tried to force his way into a residence, then fled empty-handed.

Frederick Ave. N., 200 block, April 2 to 3. Property was stolen from a barber shop. There was no sign of forced entry.

Gold Kettle Dr., 200 block, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 29. Property was stolen from a residence. There was no sign of forced entry.

Lumaryn Pl., 20000 block, 12:15 p.m. March 30. Property was stolen from a residence entered by force. Two males were seen fleeing with the property.

Mineral Springs Ct., 100 block, 3:45 a.m. March 30. Property was stolen from a residence entered by force.

Quince Orchard Rd., 600 block, 9:45 p.m. April 1. A man wearing a mask tried to break into an entertainment business by forcing a back door with a crowbar. He fled empty-handed when confronted.

Boysenberry Way, March 31 to April 1. Two Suzuki motorcycles were stolen.

These were among incidents reported by the Rockville Police Department. For information, call 240-314-8922.

Virginia Dr., 200 block, 10:27 p.m. April 2. A 38-year-old man was charged with second-degree assault and possession of a dangerous weapon (a kitchen knife) with intent to injure.

Rockville Pike, 200 block, 6:40 p.m. April 1. Four males ages 14, 15, 15 and 16, and a 17-year-old Silver Spring male were arrested. Charges included second-degree assault, attempted robbery and conspiracy to commit robbery. go to web site escape the car

Baltimore Rd., 200 block, 3:30 to 3:31 p.m. April 6. A 13-year- old female was charged with possession of a deadly weapon (kitchen knife) on school property.

Grandin Ave., 100 block, 2:30 p.m. April 2. An iPod was stolen from a residence.

Halpine Rd., 100 block, 6 p.m. April 3 to 6 p.m. April 4. A GPS device, sunglasses, a flashlight and a pocketknife were among property stolen from a vehicle in a parking garage.

Hungerford Dr., 600 block, 7:53 p.m. March 31. A Bladensburg man and a Pennsylvania man, both 31, were charged with credit-card theft.

Hungerford Dr., 600 block, 9:08 to 9:15 p.m. April 1. A wallet was stolen from a counter at grocery store.

Lewis Ave., 1400 block, 10:24 p.m. April 2. A 25-year-old man was charged with fourth-degree burglary.

Lynn Manor Dr., 200 block, 5 p.m. April 7 to 12:11 p.m. April 8. Two TVs, a laptop computer, jewelry and a GPS device were stolen from a residence.

Mannakee St., 1 to 100 block, 1 to 10:30 p.m. April 1. A camera was stolen from a locked cabinet in a college classroom.

Mill Rd., 1900 block, 8:19 p.m. April 2. A 23-year-old District woman was arrested. Charges included three counts of second- degree assault, assaulting a police officer, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and theft.

Montgomery Ave. W., 100 block, 4 p.m. April 1 to 11:45 a.m. April 2. An attempt was made to enter a gift shop by breaking glass in a door. Nothing was reported missing.

Rockville Pike, 700 block, 11:01 a.m. April 1. Cash was stolen from a donation jar at a restaurant.

Rockville Pike, 1000 block, 4 to 7:15 p.m. April 9. A bicycle was stolen from a sporting goods store.

Rockville Pike, 1700 block, 6:30 p.m. April 7 to 7 a.m. April 8. A laptop computer was stolen from a vehicle in a parking garage.

Rockville Pike, 1700 block, 6 p.m. April 9 to 11 a.m. April 10. Military uniforms, a DVD player, a stereo system, jewelry, two iPods and a backpack were among property stolen from three vehicles in a parking garage.

Rollins Ave., 100 block, 10:15 p.m. April 6 to 6 a.m. April 7. Cash was stolen from a locked safe at a business.

Vandegrift Ave., 5800 block, 12:01 March 21 to 11:34 a.m. April 6. A residence was entered by breaking glass in a back door. Nothing was reported missing.

These were among incidents reported by the Takoma Park Police Department. For information, call 301-891-7102.

Belford Pl., 400 block, 5:30 p.m. April 10 to 3:15 p.m. April 11. License plates were stolen from a vehicle parked on the street.

Eastern Ave., 6500 block, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 11. Property was stolen from a residence entered by prying open a storm door.

Elm Ave., 300 block, 10:30 a.m. April 8 to 8:30 a.m. April 9. Property was stolen from an unlocked vehicle.

Maple Ave., 7500 block, noon to 4:10 p.m. April 8. Property was stolen from outside a residence.

New Hampshire Ave., 7400 block, 7:05 a.m. April 12. Property was stolen from a hotel room.

New Hampshire Ave., 7500 block, 9:36 a.m. April 11. Two people who said that they were contractors stole property from a business.

Park Ave., 200 block, 8:30 p.m. April 8 to 11 a.m. April 9. A license plate was stolen from a vehicle.

Takoma Ave., 7300 block, 8 p.m. April 7 to 8 a.m. April 8. Property was stolen from a vehicle entered by breaking a window.

Tulip and Cedar Avenues, 8 p.m. April 7 to 8 a.m. April 8. Property was stolen from a vehicle entered by breaking a window.

Willow Ave., 7300 block, 8 p.m. April 7 to 8 a.m. April 8. Property was stolen from a vehicle entered by breaking a window.

Westmoreland Ave., 6600 block, 7 p.m. April 7 to 6:30 a.m. April 8. Property was stolen from an unlocked vehicle.

Westmoreland Ave., 6900 block, 4:30 p.m. April 9 to 10:30 p.m. April 10. Mail was stolen from a mailbox at a residence.

Lockney Ave., 8100 block, 1 to 11 a.m. April 10. A white 1997 Dodge Caravan was stolen.

Maple Ave., 7600 block, April 8 at 11:30 p.m. April 8 to 4:52 p.m. April 9. A green 1999 Infiniti I30 was stolen from a parking lot.

New Hampshire Ave., 6400 block, 5 p.m. April 13 to 5:40 a.m. April 14. Two Dodge Caravans were stolen from a business parking lot. One was later recovered; its ignition had been damaged.

New Hampshire Ave., 7300 block, 5 p.m. April 11 to 10 a.m. April 12. A white 1998 Acura Integra was stolen from a parking lot at a business.

the end of the dame… as we know it

Deep in the dead of the first winter weathered by The Dame, then-manager Cole Skinner concocted a promotion to attract patrons on weeknights when no live music was booked. He called it “Kung Fu Motorcycle Monkey.”

The idea was for a guy in a gorilla suit to serve as a deejay for the evening after making an especially flashy entrance. When the event made its debut in February 2004, Skinner, most of his staff and a handful of bewildered patrons were peering out the Dame windows awaiting the arrival of “the monkey.” Then, roaring down Upper St. came one of the oddest sights you will ever hope to discover downtown – a man wearing a gorilla suit underneath full karate regalia riding a motorcycle. Skinner opened the doors and in rode the monkey, cycle and all, to the middle of the club’s dance floor.

Another night at The Dame was underway.

Here’s another snapshot. When a Saturday night performance in 2005 by Austin, Tx.’s Asylum Street Spankers concluded at the ripe evening hour of 9 p.m., the band moved its fans, and the ensuing party they had created, out onto Main St. No, the liquor was not brought outdoors. But the piano was. So any curious motorists driving downtown that night were treated by another fantastic image: a Texan playing ragtime on an upright piano on a Main St. sidewalk.

Admittedly, monkey suits and pianos aren’t what longtime fans of the downtown music club will have on their minds when The Hot Club of Cowtown winds up the last evening of operation for The Dame on Sunday. But they do reflect just a few of the celebratory occasions that gave the club its character.

For many, The Dame meant an astonishing performance lineup of national acts that included X, Alejandro Escovedo, Man Man, The Rev. Horton Heat, North Mississippi All-Stars, Dirty Dozen Brass Band and literally hundreds of others. To some, it’s where local music was nurtured and fanbases were built. But above all, The Dame has been a neighbor. Now part of a decimated downtown entertainment corner and with relocation plans still uncertain, Sunday will officially mark last call for one of Lexington’s most heralded nightspots.

“As far as music goes, I think The Dame has put Lexington on the same level as Louisville and Cincinnati,” said Nick Sprouse, The Dame’s general manager and primary talent buyer. “Even though we have a much smaller population, we have gotten a lot of the same acts to play here.

“Granted, there has been a lot of amazing stuff that has gone on in Lexington over the years at UK, Rupp Arena, the shows Michael Johnathon has brought in and especially Lynagh’s (Music Club). But I think over the last few years, everything has really come together at The Dame.”

Lexington guitarist Willie Eames, who has played The Dame countless times with several local bands – including The Tall Boys and Club Dub – as well as a solo performer, sees the passing of The Dame as unfortunate but somewhat inevitable.

“It’s sad,” he said. “There’s just not that many places to play in Lexington for people who want something different, people who are into a scene other than, say, going to Applebee’s. But I’ve been playing long enough now that I’ve seen several clubs come and go. That’s part of the scene, too. These things are bound to happen. A club can’t go on forever. But it’s still sad when one comes to an end.”

Robby Cosenza, another multi-tasking local musician (he is a member of, among other bands, The Scourge of the Sea and The Apparitions), has also played regularly at The Dame as well as the Main St. club’s previous incarnations as The Blue Max and Millennium.

“But those places never compared to how it’s been with The Dame,” Cosenza said. “I’ve played in a lot of different cities, as well, and there just aren’t a lot of venues like it – places that have the same capacity or the same really open minded, cool staff. It’s been great to have The Dame here.”

Of course, what is making news this summer isn’t so much the actuality that The Dame is closing, but rather how it’s closing. Most clubs that shut down are simply failed businesses. The Dame had its lease bought out as part of the controversial CentrePointe project which, if approved and funded, will level all buildings on the block The Dame now stands on for construction of a 40 story hotel and condominium tower.

Formal plans for CentrePointe were announced in March. But rumors have been flying, literally, for years that the buildings where The Dame and adjacent businesses like Buster’s (which closes tonight) and Mia’s (which has already relocated) resided would close to make way for some kind of downtown redevelopment. And that speculation has weighed heavy on Sprouse.

“For the last two years, it’s been really tough,” he said. “It’s been tough on business, for one thing. Customers say The Dame is going out of business, but so many things they heard weren’t true. The customers wound up not knowing whether we were open or not. Even after the 700th time we were asked if we were closing, no one really knew what was going on – including us.”

CentrePointe’s formal announcement didn’t clear the air much, either. Sure, plans for the project were officially on the table. But The Dame’s relocation was – and still is – up in the air.

“I’ve had to turn down so many bands that wanted to play here in August, September and October because we just didn’t know what was going to happen.”

One thing is certain, though. Even if The Dame finds a new home and signs a lease today, it could be months before a new venue would be renovated and equipped enough for the club to resume business.

“I could use a little bit of a vacation,” Sprouse said. “It would be nice to get over to Al’s Bar and other spots to see what else has been going on in town. I haven’t been able to see shows as a customer for years.

“But honestly, I’m kind of numb to it all right now. This has been going on for two years. I’ve been talking about it for so long that I’m out of words to even explain myself.”

For everyone else, though, the squeeze of not having a live music venue in town on the level of The Dame, will be swiftly felt. Audiences haven’t experienced that kind of pinch since Lynagh’s Music Club closed in 2002.

“I think it’s going to hurt for awhile,” Cosenza said. “The big loss will be that the national touring bands will have nowhere to come to that’s smaller than Rupp Arena. The locals will find places to play. They always do. But for everyone, it’s going to hurt.”

“A nice sense of community has grown around The Dame over the years,” Sprouse said. “For a lot of people, going out, seeing music and even playing meant The Dame. Now all of that’s gone. It’s like a family member has died and we don’t know what to do.”

at top: The Dame on the night of the sold-out CD release party of local hip-hop stylists CunninLynguists. The date: June 22, 2007 – exactly one night before The Dame’s final night of downtown business. photo by Herald-Leader staff photographer David Stephenson… above, left: Vice Mayor Jim Gray outside The Dame last spring before walking the site of the proposed CentrePointe project

State Bank of India to sell shares Offer to help battle easing of curbs on international lenders BUSINESS ASIA by Bloomberg

International Herald Tribune December 3, 2007 | Sumit Sharma and Kartik Goyal Bloomberg News Sumit Sharma and Kartik Goyal Bloomberg News International Herald Tribune 12-03-2007 State Bank of India to sell shares Offer to help battle easing of curbs on international lenders BUSINESS ASIA by Bloomberg Byline: Sumit Sharma and Kartik Goyal Bloomberg News Edition: 1 Section: FINANCE/BUSINESS here bank of india

MUMBAI –

State Bank of India, the biggest in the nation, won approval for its first share sale in a decade, tapping government funds to help prepare for the easing of curbs on international lenders in 2009.

The state-owned bank plans to raise 167 billion rupees, or $4.2 billion, from stakeholders, a government spokesman said Friday in New Delhi on condition of anonymity.

The Finance Ministry will contribute 100 billion rupees to retain its 59.73 percent stake, the official said.

The bank’s chairman, Om Prakash Bhatt, says the bank will face competition from Citigroup and Industrial & Commercial Bank of China when they are allowed to buy rivals and sell shares in India. The bank has also lagged Indian publicly held lenders led by ICICI Bank that have raised $8 billion to fund loan growth in the second- fastest-growing economy in the world.

“State Bank of India is one of the best plays on the economy and there will be a lot of interest,” said Sam Mahtani, who manages $5 billion in emerging markets at F&C Management in London. The fund owns State Bank of India, ICICI Bank and HDFC Bank in its $450 million investment in Indian stocks.

A share sale will help the 200-year-old bank bolster its capital and meet credit demand in an economy that is heading for its fifth year of at least 8 percent growth. State Bank’s $187 billion of assets are about a 10th of Citigroup’s and a fifth of ICBC’s.

The government will issue bonds for the 100 billion rupees of shares it is buying, Priya Ranjan Dasmunsi, the minister for information and broadcasting, said in New Delhi. The government must own at least 55 percent of State Bank, and 51 percent of other government-run banks.

The bank said last month it had asked for permission to raise as much as 200 billion rupees to invest in its more than 9,500 branches and meet demand for loans from 100 million customers. The bank’s rights issue will probably be completed by March, Dasmunsi said. see here bank of india

State Bank of India’s sale follows a $5 billion issue in June by ICICI Bank, the second biggest in the nation by assets.

HDFC Bank, the third-biggest by market value, and Axis Bank raised about $1 billion each, while Infrastructure Development of India raised $519 million selling shares in July, as Indian lenders seek size to tap opportunities in a nation of 1.1 billion people.

The bank may need as much as 1 trillion rupees over the next five years to increase loans, Bhatt said in June. The bank’s share of loans in India has declined to 15.4 percent as of Sept. 30, from 17.4 percent in March 2003.

India’s $906 billion economy may grow at 9 percent, after an average 8.6 percent growth in the past four years. It expanded 8.9 percent in the three months to Sept. 30 from a year earlier after a 9.3 percent increase in the previous quarter, the statistics office said. Analysts expected an 8.7 percent gain.

Sumit Sharma and Kartik Goyal Bloomberg News

the end of buster’s… as we know it

The wall next to the beer-only bar at Buster’s tells quite a saga.

The ties to its next door neighbor, The Dame, are emphasized through a series of flyers for performances there – most of which took place months ago. But older postings that have been stapled over tell of local theatre, film and dance events. And near the bottom, almost undetectable, are remains of posters for shows at High on Rose, a longtime local bar and music spot that closed three years ago.

But the most revealing poster is plastered en masse all over the place, especially on the windows that look out upon the late night comings and goings along the corner of Main and Upper. The five words that dominate the poster’s black and white design explain the inevitable: “The End of Busters… as we know it.”

Today, in a day-long farewell that begins at noon, the mainstay bar, music joint and pool hall, which would have turned 18 years old this Halloween, closes down as part of planning for the proposed CentrePointe project. Like The Dame, Buster’s is looking to relocate. But the end of the downtown Buster’s, coupled with the already vacated Mia’s on it’s Upper St. side and the Sunday closing of The Dame to the right on Main, foretells the end of one of Lexington’s most frequented corners of downtown nightlife.

“It’s going to be interesting to walk around that corner real soon,” said Johnny Shipley, a bartender for seven years at Buster’s and the principal organizer of the bar’s intimate local music performances. “There won’t be anything there.

“It’s disappointing, of course. A lot of people that come in Buster’s may be turned off by the music on the jukebox or that we only have beer. But others really appreciate it for what it is and the character that is has. Countless times, someone comes in from New York City or Chicago or Los Angeles – any big city, really, with a lots of bars – and goes, ‘This is one of the coolest bars I’ve ever been in’ or ‘I wish LA had a pool hall like this.’ And they’re saying this about a little bar stuck in the middle of Main St. in Lexington.

“For those kinds of people, this is going to be a big loss.”

(above photo of The Dame, right, and Busters from www.preservelexington.org)

preservation act 1

The ruckus surrounding the proposed CentrePointe may have settled down a bit as of late. But that should not suggest the project is no longer with us. The deal on CentrePointe is neither dead nor done.

To help out Preserve Lexington, which is promoting alternative construction on the downtown “Dame block” that blends new architecture with existing structures deemed historical, is a benefit tonight at Al’s Bar. Performing will be a strong regional music bill that features the always hearty grooves of Club Dub, local popsters The Phat Mavericks, the Versailles psychedelic blues troupe Joint Venture and Sans Serid.

Aside from serving as a cool show for a vital cause, the Saturday benefit will be an opportune time to catch The Phat Mavericks in action. The band’s new Zebra Gazebo album is a clever cross-generational party that wraps up rockabilly, reggae-fied grooves, tropically inclined pop, swing and modest hip-hop accents in one bright, melodic package.

There is a fun performance attitude surrounding this lot, as well. Check some of it out via a fun homemade video for the tipsy Sideways Strut now playing on the Phat Mavericks’ myspace page.

Need another reason to check out Zebra Gazebo? Try this: The Phat Mavericks will donate half the proceeds of the album’s sales tonight to Preserve Lexington.

The band will also be chatting and performing Saturday on WRFL-FM between 4 and 6 p.m.as a warmup for the show.

Still want more? Then keep May 15 open. That’s when The Phat Mavericks will headline its own concert at The Dame, one of the very downtown businesses Preserve Lexington is hoping to preserve.

The Benefit for Preservation Lexington will be held at 8 tonight at Al’s Bar, Sixth St. and North Limestone. Admission is $5. Call (859) 252-9104.

2001 Grand Junction, Colorado (GJT)

Weather Almanac January 1, 2004 2001 GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO (GJT) Grand Junction is located at the junction of the Colorado and Gunnison Rivers. It is on the west slope of the Rockies, in a large mountain valley. The area has a climate marked by the wide seasonal range usual to interior localities at this latitude. Thanks, however, to the protective topography of the vicinity, sudden and severe weather changes are very infrequent. The valley floor slopes from 4,800 feet near Palisade to 4,400 feet at the west end near Fruita. Mountains are on all sides at distances of from 10 to 60 miles and reach heights of 9,000 to over 12,000 feet.

This mountain valley location, with attendant valley breezes, provides protection from spring and fall frosts. This results in a growing season averaging 191 days in the city. This varies considerably in the outlying districts. It is about the same in the upper valley around Palisade, and 3 to 4 weeks shorter near the river west of Grand Junction. The growing season is sufficiently long to permit commercial growth of almost all fruits except citrus varieties. Summer grazing of cattle and sheep on nearby mountain ranges is extensive.

The interior, continental location, ringed by mountains on all sides, results in quite low precipitation in all seasons. Consequently, agriculture is dependent on irrigation. Adequate supplies of water are available from mountain snows and rains. Summer rains occur chiefly as scattered light showers and thunderstorms which develop over nearby mountains. Winter snows are fairly frequent, but are mostly light and quick to melt. Even the infrequent snows of from 4 to 8 inches seldom remain on the ground for prolonged periods. Blizzard conditions in the valley are extremely rare.

Temperatures above 100 degrees are infrequent, and about one?ˆ“third of the winters have no readings below zero. Summer days with maximum temperatures in the middle 90s and minimums in the low 60s are common. Relative humidity is very low during the summer, with values similar to other dry locations such as the southern parts of New Mexico and Arizona. Spells of cold winter weather are sometimes prolonged due to cold air becoming trapped in the valley. Winds are usually very light during the coldest weather. Changes in winter are normally gradual, and abrupt changes are much less frequent than in eastern Colorado. Cold waves are rare. Sunny days predominate in all seasons.

The prevailing wind is from the east?ˆ“southeast due to the valley breeze effect. The strongest winds are associated with thunderstorms or with pre?ˆ“frontal weather. They usually are from the south or southwest.

NORMALS, MEANS, AND EXTREMES GRAND JUNCTION, CO (GJT) LATITUDE:? ? ? ? LONGITUDE:? ? ? ? ELEVATION (FT):? ? ? ? TIME ZONE:? ? ? ? WBAN: 23066 39 08?ˆ? 03?ˆ? N? ? 108 32?ˆ? 15?ˆ? W? ? GRND: 4823? ? BARO: 4826? ? MOUNTAIN (UTC + 7)
ELEMENT
POR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
YEAR
TEMPERATURE F
NORMAL DAILY MAXIMUM
30
35.5
45.4
55.6
65.8
76.0
87.7
93.6
90.5
81.1
67.7
51.4
38.7
65.8

MEAN DAILY MAXIMUM
54
36.4
44.8
54.8
65.0
75.8
87.3
93.1
89.8
81.1
67.8
50.6
39.1
65.5

HIGHEST DAILY MAXIMUM
55
60
68
81
89
101
105
105
103
100
88
75
64
105

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1971
1986
1971
1992
2000
1990
1976
2000
1995
1963
1977
1980
JUN 1990

MEAN OF EXTREME MAXS.
54
49.3
58.5
70.7
80.5
89.4
98.4
100.8
98.1
92.6
81.6
65.1
52.5
78.1

NORMAL DAILY MINIMUM
30
14.5
23.5
31.3
38.5
47.9
57.1
63.9
62.2
52.8
41.6
29.4
18.7
40.1

MEAN DAILY MINIMUM
54
16.4
23.3
30.9
38.7
48.0
57.0
63.8
61.8
52.9
41.1
28.5
19.0
40.1

LOWEST DAILY MINIMUM
55
-23
-18
5
11
26
34
44
43
29
18
-2
-17
-23

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1963
1989
1948
1975
1970
1976
1993
1968
1978
1993
1976
1990
JAN 1963

MEAN OF EXTREME MINS.
54
1.5
8.0
17.7
25.5
34.7
44.4
55.5
53.2
40.2
28.2
15.2
5.2
27.4

NORMAL DRY BULB
30
25.0
34.5
43.4
52.2
62.0
72.4
78.8
76.4
67.0
54.7
40.4
28.7
53.0

MEAN DRY BULB
54
26.4
34.0
42.8
51.8
61.8
72.2
78.4
75.8
67.0
54.4
39.7
28.9
52.8

MEAN WET BULB
18
24.0
30.2
36.2
41.3
48.1
53.4
58.6
58.8
51.4
42.7
32.8
25.2
41.9

MEAN DEW POINT
18
18.2
22.7
24.9
27.9
33.1
35.6
43.7
46.1
37.7
30.3
24.2
18.8
30.3

NORMAL NO. DAYS WITH:

MAXIMUM 90
30
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.2
14.3
24.8
19.4
4.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
63.9

MAXIMUM 32
30
11.7
2.3
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.6
7.2
22.0

MINIMUM 32
30
30.3
24.7
17.1
6.6
0.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
2.9
20.2
29.5
131.8

MINIMUM 0
30
4.0
0.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
*
1.4
6.0
H/C
NORMAL HEATING DEG. DAYS
30
1240
854
670
389
132
13
0
0
55
332
738
1125
5548

NORMAL COOLING DEG. DAYS
30
0
0
0
0
39
235
428
353
115
13
0
0
1183
RH
NORMAL (PERCENT)
30
70
60
50
40
36
29
34
37
39
46
58
68
47

HOUR 05 LST
30
77
71
63
55
51
44
48
51
52
58
70
76
60

HOUR 11 LST
30
64
53
42
33
30
24
28
32
34
38
50
61
41

HOUR 17 LST
30
61
47
36
27
24
19
22
24
26
33
46
59
35

HOUR 23 LST
30
75
66
56
45
40
32
36
39
42
51
64
73
52
S
PERCENT POSSIBLE SUNSHINE
55
61
65
65
70
73
81
79
77
79
74
63
61
71
W/O
MEAN NO. DAYS WITH:

HEAVY FOG (VISBY 1/4 MI)
56
2.7
1.8
0.6
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.8
2.0
8.2

THUNDERSTORMS
56
0.1
0.3
0.8
2.1
4.8
4.8
7.6
8.2
5.3
1.5
0.4
0.1
36.0
CLOUDINESS
MEAN:

SUNRISE-SUNSET (OKTAS)
50
4.9
5.0
5.0
4.8
4.4
3.2
3.3
3.4
2.9
3.4
4.2
4.5
4.1

MIDNIGHT-MIDNIGHT (OKTAS)
32
4.6
4.4
4.6
4.3
4.0
3.0
3.2
3.3
2.7
3.2
4.0
4.3
3.8

MEAN NO. DAYS WITH:

CLEAR
51
9.1
7.6
8.0
7.9
9.6
14.9
13.7
13.1
16.0
14.7
10.4
9.6
134.6

PARTLY CLOUDY
51
7.0
7.4
8.6
9.4
10.7
9.4
11.2
11.2
8.1
7.6
7.4
7.6
105.6

CLOUDY
51
14.8
13.3
14.4
12.7
10.7
5.7
5.5
6.1
5.3
8.0
11.6
13.1
121.2
PR
MEAN STATION PRESSURE (IN)
29
25.20
25.19
25.10
25.10
25.10
25.10
25.20
25.20
25.20
25.20
25.21
25.30
25.17

MEAN SEA-LEVEL PRES. (IN)
18
30.23
30.10
29.97
29.89
29.83
29.81
29.87
29.91
29.94
30.03
30.12
30.22
29.99
WINDS
MEAN SPEED (MPH)
55
5.8
6.7
8.4
9.4
9.6
9.8
9.6
9.3
9.2
8.1
6.9
6.1
8.2

PREVAIL. DIR (TENS OF DEGS)

MAXIMUM 2-MINUTE:

SPEED (MPH)
5
36
41
53
49
44
48
41
45
38
44
37
35
53

DIR. (TENS OF DEGS)

25
20
34
27
25
30
15
24
30
21
13
31
34

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1999
1998
2001
2000
2000
1999
2000
1999
2000
1997
1997
2000
MAR 2001

MAXIMUM 5-SECOND:

SPEED (MPH)
5
45
55
60
60
54
55
52
64
48
54
45
43
64

DIR. (TENS OF DEGS)

23
19
34
19
25
31
15
26
29
22
26
31
26

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1999
1998
2001
2000
2000
1999
2000
1999
2001
1997
1999
2000
AUG 1999
PRECIPITATION
NORMAL (IN)
30
0.56
0.48
0.90
0.75
0.87
0.50
0.65
0.81
0.82
0.98
0.71
0.61
8.64

MAXIMUM MONTHLY (IN)
55
2.46
1.56
2.02
2.15
2.04
2.07
1.92
3.48
2.84
3.45
2.00
1.89
3.48

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1957
1948
1979
1997
1995
1969
1983
1957
1997
1972
1983
1951
AUG 1957

MINIMUM MONTHLY (IN)
55
T
T
0.02
0.06
T
T
0.01
0.04

0.00

0.01
0.00

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1961
1972
1972
1958
1970
1980
1994
1956

1952

1976
OCT 1952

MAXIMUM IN 24 HOURS (IN)
55
0.72
0.81
1.15
1.33
1.13
1.57
1.42
1.68
1.35
1.24
0.83
1.16
1.68

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

2000
1996
1993
1965
1983
1969
1974
1997
1965
1957
1983
1951
AUG 1997

NORMAL NO. DAYS WITH:

PRECIPITATION 0.01
30
6.4
5.2
7.7
6.6
6.3
4.2
5.8
6.1
6.3
5.6
5.6
6.4
72.2

PRECIPITATION 1.00
30
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
*
*
0.0
*
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
SNOWFALL
NORMAL (IN)
30
6.6
3.3
3.7
1.2
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.7
2.5
5.7
24.0

MAXIMUM MONTHLY (IN)
55
33.7
18.4
14.9
14.3
5.0
T
T
T
3.1
6.1
12.1
19.0
33.7

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1957
1948
1948
1975
1979
1997
2001
1993
1965
1975
1964
1983
JAN 1957

MAXIMUM IN 24 HOURS (IN)
55
9.1
9.0
6.1
8.9
5.0
T
T
T
3.1
6.1
8.4
6.3
9.1

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1957
1989
1948
1975
1979
1997
2001
1993
1965
1975
1954
1998
JAN 1957

MAXIMUM SNOW DEPTH (IN)
53
16
12
8
7
1
0
0
0
2
5
8
11
16

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1957
1957
1960
1975
1979

1965
1975
1954
1983
JAN 1957

NORMAL NO. DAYS WITH:

SNOWFALL 1.0
30
2.5
1.0
1.2
0.3
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.*
0.2
0.8
2.1
8.2
PRECIPITATION (inches) 2001 GRAND JUNCTION, CO (GJT)
YEAR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANNUAL
1972
0.20
T
0.02
0.11
0.44
0.64
0.03
0.29
0.72
3.45
0.69
0.74
7.33
1973
0.79
0.12
0.65
0.86
1.45
0.87
0.52
0.62
0.33
0.20
0.91
0.62
7.94
1974
1.20
0.40
0.81
1.03
0.01
0.14
1.53
0.48
0.38
0.72
1.18
0.32
8.20
1975
0.53
0.49
1.74
1.38
1.23
0.43
1.39
0.09
0.16
0.85
0.39
0.50
9.18
1976
0.13
0.81
0.75
0.40
1.49
0.14
0.20
0.31
0.67
0.32
0.04
0.01
5.27
1977
0.37
0.06
0.50
0.54
0.59
0.04
0.89
0.59
0.52
0.50
0.70
0.38
5.68
1978
1.08
0.64
1.19
1.19
0.55
0.01
0.25
0.54
0.49
0.03
0.62
1.30
7.89
1979
1.36
0.63
2.02
0.42
1.45
0.78
0.08
0.61
0.01
0.25
1.02
0.27
8.90
1980
0.57
1.10
1.77
0.53
1.17
T
0.96
1.39
0.58
1.31
0.52
0.24
10.14
1981
0.44
0.16
1.35
0.56
1.49
0.17
0.41
0.82
0.25
2.06
0.47
0.60
8.78
1982
0.29
0.41
0.79
0.09
0.75
0.21
0.35
0.94
2.81
0.83
0.48
0.27
8.22
1983
0.50
0.64
1.59
0.90
1.68
1.54
1.92
0.73
1.11
0.36
2.00
1.85
14.82
1984
0.28
0.11
1.57
1.21
0.55
1.68
0.62
1.77
0.34
2.65
0.38
0.43
11.59
1985
0.51
0.26
0.92
1.78
1.09
0.39
1.21
0.24
1.67
2.32
1.10
0.73
12.22
1986
0.13
0.33
0.25
0.71
1.15
0.15
0.94
0.97
1.52
1.22
1.02
0.47
8.86
1987
0.30
1.21
1.95
0.46
1.51
0.23
1.51
0.83
0.13
0.65
1.92
0.83
11.53
1988
1.07
0.21
0.72
0.99
1.10
0.21
0.18
1.37
0.76
0.02
1.02
0.20
7.85
1989
0.98
1.33
0.51
0.23
0.39
0.24
0.27
1.01
0.33
0.14
T
0.08
5.51
1990
0.59
0.55
1.07
0.71
0.05
0.26
0.96
0.49
1.23
0.95
0.57
0.98
8.41
1991
0.92
0.13
0.70
0.87
0.20
0.30
0.40
0.57
2.30
1.20
1.10
0.54
9.23
1992
0.24
0.35
1.71
0.15
1.81
0.17
1.03
0.84
0.33
1.45
0.76
0.35
9.19
1993
1.36
1.09
1.72
1.30
1.99
0.03
0.04
1.42
0.41
1.34
0.41
0.57
11.68
1994
0.23
0.56
0.25
1.81
0.19
0.04
0.01
0.48
1.50
0.58
0.69
0.64
6.98
1995
0.62
0.52
1.74
0.96
2.04
1.32
0.87
0.47
0.66
0.24
0.20
0.55
10.19
1996
0.65
1.07
0.53
0.90
0.99
0.58
0.77
0.15
1.53
1.35
1.01
0.53
10.06
1997
0.63
0.34
0.53
2.15
1.53
0.29
0.28
2.67
2.84
1.20
0.62
0.14
13.22
1998
0.47
0.48
1.36
0.75
0.21
0.55
1.21
0.61
1.44
1.36
0.42
0.26
9.12
1999
0.09
0.28
0.03
2.06
0.68
0.60
0.51
2.22
1.01
0.17
0.18
0.26
8.09
2000
1.35
0.70
1.26
0.32
0.43
0.34
0.20
0.60
0.60
1.18
0.35
0.18
7.51
2001
0.43
0.67
0.98
0.58
0.57
T
1.20
1.46
0.15
0.99
1.06
0.31
8.40
POR=109 YRS
0.61
0.59
0.84
0.78
0.79
0.44
0.62
1.03
0.84
0.90
0.61
0.50
8.55
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE (F) 2001 GRAND JUNCTION, CO (GJT)
YEAR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANNUAL
1972
30.0
36.6
46.6
53.3
63.1
74.3
80.2
77.1
68.1
54.0
37.1
22.7
53.6
1973
11.5
29.1
42.1
48.1
61.5
70.5
78.1
77.4
65.7
56.4
41.2
30.1
51.0
1974
16.9
19.9
48.2
51.0
65.0
74.9
78.3
75.6
66.4
56.2
39.6
27.1
51.6
1975
20.0
33.0
41.0
46.4
57.1
67.5
78.3
75.4
67.1
53.5
36.2
27.4
50.2
1976
21.7
38.2
38.7
51.9
61.8
70.4
79.6
75.3
66.9
51.2
39.1
27.6
51.9
1977
23.9
37.1
40.8
56.9
63.7
79.1
80.2
78.3
70.2
58.2
40.3
33.3
55.2
1978
29.4
34.4
46.7
52.3
58.8
73.0
78.4
74.5
65.7
54.7
40.2
16.0
52.0
1979
16.6
23.5
41.1
52.5
60.3
71.0
78.7
74.6
72.0
58.9
33.2
26.9
50.8
1980
32.6
39.2
40.9
51.4
59.1
74.0
78.6
75.3
67.9
53.8
42.3
40.1
54.6
1981
36.8
37.9
44.0
56.8
60.9
76.4
79.4
76.8
69.2
50.7
41.6
31.3
55.2
1982
26.0
34.7
46.0
51.3
61.4
72.2
79.0
78.2
67.5
51.9
41.2
33.0
53.5
1983
34.3
40.9
45.9
48.7
58.7
69.8
78.3
80.4
71.4
58.2
42.1
30.5
54.9
1984
20.7
31.7
44.4
49.0
66.2
70.1
78.0
76.6
68.3
50.2
40.8
32.6
52.4
1985
31.1
32.0
43.9
54.5
63.6
73.0
77.6
77.1
62.4
52.8
38.8
31.9
53.2
1986
34.2
40.4
49.0
52.5
60.6
74.3
76.0
75.6
63.2
51.5
40.8
32.4
54.2
1987
27.4
36.8
40.1
54.5
61.2
73.5
75.2
72.9
66.2
56.8
39.6
27.9
52.7
1988
17.4
29.2
41.0
53.1
60.9
76.5
80.6
76.2
64.5
58.9
40.7
30.0
52.4
1989
20.2
27.7
47.5
57.0
63.8
71.0
80.5
74.4
68.3
54.9
40.6
29.2
52.9
1990
28.5
35.4
46.8
55.7
61.3
75.2
78.0
76.6
69.7
53.2
39.5
20.6
53.4
1991
17.6
32.0
42.0
48.8
62.0
72.5
77.6
76.2
66.5
55.0
37.7
26.2
51.2
1992
19.9
37.6
47.2
59.0
64.5
71.2
75.1
75.1
67.7
57.8
35.9
24.5
53.0
1993
31.9
36.2
45.6
50.0
61.9
70.1
76.7
73.2
65.9
51.7
35.6
29.2
52.3
1994
31.7
34.2
47.4
53.2
65.3
77.8
81.3
79.4
68.3
52.9
37.1
33.1
55.1
1995
33.7
43.4
46.2
50.6
56.9
67.8
76.1
79.0
68.5
53.3
43.6
35.3
54.5
1996
30.1
40.2
44.9
51.0
64.2
73.3
79.2
77.6
63.0
51.3
39.9
30.7
53.8
1997
30.6
34.2
45.0
46.5
62.2
72.7
76.2
74.0
66.4
51.7
38.2
28.2
52.2
1998
33.5
35.8
41.8
48.8
62.1
67.8
79.1
76.8
70.0
53.3
40.8
25.6
53.0
1999
32.9
37.4
48.5
47.8
58.7
70.6
77.6
73.6
63.5
54.2
43.0
30.3
53.2
2000
32.8
39.5
43.4
56.4
65.8
73.1
80.1
78.4
67.2
54.4
32.8
30.8
54.6
2001
28.0
36.2
45.3
53.8
64.3
74.1
78.9
75.7
69.7
55.0
43.7
28.3
54.4
POR=109 YRS
26.2
33.7
43.1
52.2
61.8
72.0
78.2
75.6
66.9
54.2
39.7
28.6
52.7
REFERENCE NOTES: grandjunctioncoloradonow.com grand junction colorado go to site grand junction colorado

PAGE 1:

THE TEMPERATURE GRAPH SHOWS NORMAL MAXIMUM AND NORMAL MINIMUM DAILY TEMPERATURES (SOLID CURVES) AND THE ACTUAL DAILY HIGH AND LOW TEMPERATURES (VERTICAL BARS).

PAGE 2 AND 3:

H/C INDICATES HEATING AND COOLING DEGREE DAYS.

RH INDICATES RELATIVE HUMIDITY W/O INDICATES WEATHER AND OBSTRUCTIONS S INDICATES SUNSHINE.

PR INDICATES PRESSURE.

CLOUDINESS ON PAGE 3 IS THE SUM OF THE CEILOMETER AND SATELLITE DATA NOT TO EXCEED EIGHT EIGHTHS (OKTAS).

GENERAL:

T INDICATES TRACE PRECIPITATION, AN AMOUNT GREATER THAN ZERO BUT LESS THAN THE LOWEST REPORTABLE VALUE.

+ INDICATES THE VALUE ALSO OCCURS ON EARLIER DATES.

BLANK ENTRIES DENOTE MISSING OR UNREPORTED DATA.

NORMALS ARE 30?ˆ“YEAR AVERAGES (1961?ˆ“1990).

ASOS INDICATES AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEM.

PM INDICATES THE LAST DAY OF THE PREVIOUS MONTH.

POR (PERIOD OF RECORD) BEGINS WITH THE JANUARY DATA MONTH AND IS THE NUMBER OF YEARS USED TO COMPUTE THE MEAN. INDIVIDUAL MONTHS WITHIN THE POR MAY BE MISSING.

WHEN THE POR FOR A NORMAL IS LESS THAN 30 YEARS, THE NORMAL IS PROVISIONAL AND IS BASED ON THE NUMBER OF YEARS INDICATED.

0.* OR * INDICATES THE VALUE OR MEAN?ˆ“DAYS?ˆ“WITH IS BETWEEN 0.00 AND 0.05.

CLOUDINESS FOR ASOS STATIONS DIFFERS FROM THE NON?ˆ“ASOS OBSERVATION TAKEN BY A HUMAN OBSERVER. ASOS STATION CLOUDINESS IS BASED ON TIME?ˆ“AVERAGED CEILOMETER DATA FOR CLOUDS AT OR BELOW 12,000 FEET AND ON SATELLITE DATA FOR CLOUDS ABOVE 12,000 FEET.

THE NUMBER OF DAYS WITH CLEAR, PARTLY CLOUDY, AND CLOUDY CONDITIONS FOR ASOS STATIONS IS THE SUM OF THE CEILOMETER AND SATELLITE DATA FOR THE SUNRISE TO SUNSET PERIOD.

GENERAL CONTINUED:

CLEAR INDICATES 0?ˆ“2 OKTAS, PARTLY CLOUDY INDICATES 3?ˆ“6 OKTAS, AND CLOUDY INDICATES 7 OR 8 OKTAS. WHEN AT LEAST ONE OF THE ELEMENTS (CEILOMETER OR SATELLITE) IS MISSING, THE DAILY CLOUDINESS IS NOT COMPUTED.

WIND DIRECTION IS RECORDED IN TENS OF DEGREES (2 DIGITS) CLOCKWISE FROM TRUE NORTH. “00″ INDICATES CALM. “36″ INDICATES TRUE NORTH.

RESULTANT WIND IS THE VECTOR AVERAGE OF THE SPEED AND DIRECTION.

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IS THE SUM OF THE MEAN DAILY MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM TEMPERATURE DIVIDED BY 2.

SNOWFALL DATA COMPRISE ALL FORMS OF FROZEN PRECIPITATION, INCLUDING HAIL.

A HEATING (COOLING) DEGREE DAY IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE AND 65 F.

DRY BULB IS THE TEMPERATURE OF THE AMBIENT AIR.

DEW POINT IS THE TEMPERATURE TO WHICH THE AIR MUST BE COOLED TO ACHIEVE 100 PERCENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY.

WET BULB IS THE TEMPERATURE THE AIR WOULD HAVE IF THE MOISTURE CONTENT WAS INCREASED TO 100 PERCENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY.

ON JULY 1, 1996, THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BEGAN USING THE “METAR” OBSERVATION CODE THAT WAS ALREADY EMPLOYED BY MOST OTHER NATIONS OF THE WORLD. THE MOST NOTICEABLE DIFFERENCE IN THIS ANNUAL PUBLICATION WILL BE THE CHANGE IN UNITS FROM TENTHS TO EIGHTS (OKTAS) FOR REPORTING THE AMOUNT OF SKY COVER.

HEATING DEGREE DAYS (base 65 F) 2001 GRAND JUNCTION, CO (GJT)
YEAR
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
TOTAL
1972-73
0
0
31
335
832
1303
1651
999
705
499
139
49
6543
1973-74
0
0
72
266
708
1075
1487
1260
513
415
66
32
5894
1974-75
0
0
60
266
756
1167
1387
888
736
551
249
51
6111
1975-76
0
0
35
358
858
1161
1335
775
807
386
122
25
5862
1976-77
0
0
41
421
769
1153
1267
775
743
250
94
0
5513
1977-78
0
1
17
214
736
975
1098
852
561
373
210
9
5046
1978-79
0
6
95
313
737
1510
1493
1154
732
377
192
37
6646
1979-80
0
3
0
209
945
1175
999
741
740
405
195
4
5416
1980-81
0
2
21
359
674
765
864
754
645
247
153
15
4499
1981-82
0
0
12
439
696
1039
1203
841
581
405
136
6
5358
1982-83
2
0
61
397
704
983
946
668
586
482
238
22
5089
1983-84
0
0
27
208
678
1064
1366
959
631
474
89
44
5540
1984-85
0
0
54
452
719
996
1044
919
646
310
81
12
5233
1985-86
0
0
139
371
779
1018
949
685
489
366
168
3
4967
1986-87
0
0
130
414
718
1001
1159
785
765
314
143
0
5429
1987-88
0
6
34
248
754
1147
1469
1031
741
350
172
8
5960
1988-89
0
0
106
183
724
1078
1379
1038
534
258
113
8
5421
1989-90
0
0
40
316
729
1103
1124
820
557
271
139
20
5119
1990-91
0
0
28
360
759
1371
1464
919
706
478
136
18
6239
1991-92
0
2
37
304
815
1193
1390
788
540
195
53
8
5325
1992-93
0
6
25
222
868
1245
1018
799
597
446
144
33
5403
1993-94
4
0
59
410
875
1102
1025
853
540
360
64
0
5292
1994-95
0
0
24
368
832
984
962
596
578
425
256
47
5072
1995-96
8
0
73
357
634
914
1073
712
614
415
88
2
4890
1996-97
0
0
135
421
748
1055
1056
857
613
547
122
4
5558
1997-98
0
0
42
412
799
1138
970
813
709
478
137
55
5553
1998-99
0
0
9
355
715
1217
987
767
501
508
219
33
5311
1999-00
0
0
88
331
651
1067
992
732
663
256
100
1
4881
2000-01
0
0
58
339
959
1053
1140
802
605
333
105
31
5425
2001-
0
0
23
316
633
1130

COOLING DEGREE DAYS (base 65 F) 2001 GRAND JUNCTION, CO (GJT)
YEAR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANNUAL
1972
0
0
0
0
86
288
479
381
130
3
0
0
1367
1973
0
0
0
0
35
222
410
393
101
6
0
0
1167
1974
0
0
0
1
73
335
420
335
109
0
0
0
1273
1975
0
0
0
0
9
133
419
328
106
9
0
0
1004
1976
0
0
0
0
32
195
460
324
103
0
0
0
1114
1977
0
0
0
16
60
429
477
420
180
10
0
0
1592
1978
0
0
0
0
25
258
420
308
123
1
0
0
1135
1979
0
0
0
6
52
225
428
310
215
27
0
0
1263
1980
0
0
0
1
16
280
427
325
115
19
0
0
1183
1981
0
0
0
9
31
367
456
375
143
0
0
0
1381
1982
0
0
0
0
33
229
443
415
144
0
0
0
1264
1983
0
0
0
0
49
171
421
483
226
3
0
0
1353
1984
0
0
0
0
134
200
408
368
159
0
0
0
1269
1985
0
0
0
4
45
261
396
382
67
0
0
0
1155
1986
0
0
0
0
39
289
348
334
82
0
0
0
1092
1987
0
0
0
5
30
262
324
256
76
2
0
0
955
1988
0
0
0
0
51
360
489
357
98
4
0
0
1359
1989
0
0
0
26
85
195
489
300
145
11
0
0
1251
1990
0
0
0
1
34
331
412
368
174
3
0
0
1323
1991
0
0
0
0
50
247
398
356
88
0
0
0
1139
1992
0
0
0
21
43
203
319
328
114
7
0
0
1035
1993
0
0
0
0
56
193
371
260
92
6
0
0
978
1994
0
0
0
13
82
388
514
454
126
0
0
0
1577
1995
0
0
0
0
9
138
362
444
185
3
0
0
1141
1996
0
0
0
1
67
256
448
396
82
4
0
0
1254
1997
0
0
0
0
44
240
353
285
93
8
0
0
1023
1998
0
0
0
0
51
148
445
375
163
0
0
0
1182
1999
0
0
0
0
27
204
401
274
45
4
0
0
955
2000
0
0
0
5
131
249
476
421
129
15
0
0
1426
2001
0
0
0
3
89
311
437
341
170
13
0
0
1364

in performance: kenny chesney

kenny chesneyEven a country music beachcomber like Kenny Chesney had to admit in the midst of the most improbable concert to roll into downtown in ages that summertime was still a ways off.

Of course, wherever Chesney travels, a bit of the tropics tends to follow. On Friday night, in the teeth of one of the nastiest storms so far this winter, Chesney took his fun-in-the-sun country pop not to the cavernous Rupp Arena, but straight to the heart of The Dame. There he played, along with his seven member band, on a tiny club stage without his usual playground of lighting rigs and video screens. But downsizing the arena props proved to be half the fun.

Friday’s date with The Dame – the singer’s first concert appearance of 2008 and one of only seven club outings on his Keg in the Closet Tour – was a vastly looser affair than any of Chesney’s numerous Rupp outings. Before a sold out crowd of roughly 350 that included Vice Mayor Jim Gray, Chesney offered a program chock full of hits that shifted from the show-opening Live Those Songs to the island reverie No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problem to the brezzy pop stride of Beer in Mexico.

Chesney seemed to revel the bar setting. Sure, the looseness got a little too loose at times, as in the botched cues that made Big Star something of a big mess. But even then, the mood compensated. Chesney remained all smiles, slapped hands with fans at the front of the stage and, in general, made the boast of “I feel right at home here” seem quite genuine.

Due to the show’s late starting time (Chesney didn’t take the stage until 10:10), only the first half of Chesney’s one hour, 45 minute performance could be reviewed before deadline. But that still left time for numerous highlights, specifically the frat-country guitar strut of the tour’s namesake tune, Keg in the Closet, the midtempo seasonal meditation Summertime and the affirmative ballad One of the These Days.

Even Chesney’s appearance was extra casual. Instead of the requisite cowboy hat, the singer opted for a functional yet fashionable Cleveland Indians baseball cap.

Of course, the sheer unlikelihood of an event like this, its impromptu scheduling (the show wasn’t announced until Wednesday) and especially its place in what has been a tumultuous week for The Dame (given the unveiling of the proposed CentrePointe development, which could possibly demolish the club as early as this summer) almost overshadowed the concert itself.

But Chesney is arguably the most bankable country star on the planet. Having such a visible artist take such an unintentional but commanding role in downtown nightlife, even if it was just for one night, was a joy that had to crack the exterior of even the most hardened critic of his music.

There were signs of Chesney’s celebrity status all about Friday’s show, of course – specifically the army of stagehands and security guards along with an arsenal of guitars squeezed into the short passageway that led from the club’s stage to its downstairs green room.

But by the same token, there was remarkably little fuss outside the club, save for the wait fans had to endure in the midst of snow and freezing rain before being admitted to The Dame. Once inside, though, as real of a summertime spirit as could be summoned quickly warmed everyone up.

kenny and the dame

kenny chesney

It’s tough not to be struck by the irony of it all. On the very day that word surfaced about the possible demise – or complete obliteration, if you want to get seriously real about it – of The Dame came the surprise announcement that country star Kenny Chesney had been booked at the club for an impromptu show on Friday.

I make no bones about my misgivings concerning the modern state of country music, just as I’ll gladly yell to the treetops that tearing down The Dame and the entire block of Main/Upper/Vine Street businesses and historical buildings surrounding it so a 40 story Godzilla with underground parking can be constructed is a serious cultural setback for downtown.

Country music, as defined by Chesney is essentially pop that is just a degree or two removed from Jimmy Buffett. Both are about as traditionally country as a C-Span special. But for anyone thinking that wiping The Dame off the face of downtown is a casual thing, keep in mind Chesney is the act that brought 16,000 fans into Rupp Arena in 2006 and 19,000 the year before that. The Dame is one of only seven college friendly clubs he will be playing as a warm-up for a spring-summer trek of ampitheatres and stadiums. The Dame didn’t even lobby for the show. Chesney’s management approached the club.

So for this week, I happily welcome Mr. Chesney back to town. Maybe, just maybe, having him playing The Dame on Friday, will make a point. Maybe the hysteria that will ignite when an artist capable of packing tens of thousands into an arena chooses to play in a Main Street club for roughly three or four hundred will illuminate the kind of downtown nightlife that could very easily disappear if The Dame gets demolished.

For that reason alone, I will, for at least one night, be one of the biggest Kenny Chesney fans in the world.

(above photo of Kenny Chesney at Rupp Arena in 2006 by Herald-Leader staff photographer Mark Cornelison)

The Orchard Celebrates the Release of Mojo Nixon’s Latest Album. go to site amazon promotional code free shipping

Health & Beauty Close-Up November 1, 2009 In support and celebration of the release of Mojo Nixon’s latest album “Whiskey Rebellion,” The Orchard, a full service media company specializing in the distribution of music and video entertainment, on October 6 announced that Mojo’s entire catalog would be available to download at no cost, exclusively from Amazon MP3.

Since this announcement, The Orchard reported that the promotion has led to more than one million downloads of Mojo’s music. The downloads were available at amazon.com/mojo until October 28th.

“The successful execution of this promotion has generated tremendous awareness for Mojo,” said Brad Navin, EVP and General Manager of The Orchard. “This is a showcase of how The Orchard, as a nimble and forward-thinking company, has the ability to orchestrate trendsetting promotions for our clients. The success of this promotion will be measured by its long-term benefits, not the short-term risks, and our expectation is that it will generate sales momentum.” Mojo Nixon’s current catalog includes 11 albums and 144 tracks. The downloads for this music during the two weeks of the Amazon promotional period amounted to a 23,000 percent increase from paid downloads across all digital retail networks in the United States during the first half of 2009. go to website amazon promotional code free shipping

Mojo Nixon is currently a full-time on-air personality on Sirius XM Satellite radio hosting a daily music show on the Outlaw Country channel, a weekly political talk show on the Raw Dog Comedy Channel and a weekly racing show on the NASCAR channel.

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the dame block

the dameNow we finally know. After nearly two years of speculation, plans were officially unveiled yesterday to wipe clean a cherished block along Main Street and essentially ignore the Courthouse Design Area Overlay Zone (designed to preserve historic architecture around the downtown Courthouse) and the Downtown Master Plan (the taxpayer funded recommendations for building heights and pedestrian savvy street designs)

In short, where once stood The Dame, Buster’s and Mia’s – which will become no more than dust and memories by the summer if the plan is approved – will be a 40 story tower with a estimated price tag of $250 million.

I’ll leave the historical and ecological ramifications of such a severe overhaul to wiser minds that deal more readily with those concerns. And let us all suppress snickers over claims that construction of this beast will be finished in time for the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in 2010. Let’s just focus for a moment on life without The Dame Block.

Collectively, the three establishments at the corner of Main and Upper are an entertainment block that has become one of the most visibly active centers of downtown nightlife. Maybe to some they are simply a music club, pool hall and bar. But in a city starved for nightlife, especially nightlife that doesn’t drain patrons’ wallets dry, The Dame Block has achieved what few business collectives have over the years: it has brought people downtown.

Is construction necessary on The Dame Block? Absolutely. Ever since the painfully slow erosion and eventual demolition of Woolworth’s, the block is like a face with a few missing teeth. So why not reconstruct what’s left instead of starting anew with a building that extinguishes one of downtown’s few proven, year-round centers of nightlife.

Save the historical structures. Keep the nightlife. Incorporate cutting edge architecture that would make something new and better out of something that is valued but neglected.

And, yes, bringing this around to my cause, the thought of losing or even relocating The Dame – far and away the city’s most respected music establishment – is simply heartbreaking.

So now is the time to let city officials know how you feel. Start by emailing Mayor Jim Newberry at mayor@lfucg.com. That’s what he’s there for. Express your opinion to your councilman. Tell anyone you know that putting a new face on Main Street doesn’t mean having to destroy the old one.

The plan is now out, but it’s far from a done deal. If keeping a corner of downtown alive with music and nightlife is important, the time to act is now.


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