in performance: postmodern jukebox

Rogelio Douglas Jr of Postmodern Jukebox.

For all the concern in capturing the feel of the 1920s, a sentiment that extended to tagging its current tour as “Welcome to the Twenties 2.0,” Postmodern Jukebox didn’t seem content in staying put in any set time zone Saturday evening at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

Sure, the better part of its immensely entertaining two set, two hour concert used the a 30 year span stretching from the Roaring ‘20s to the Post-war era as a ballpark scenario for its jazz and blues re-castings of contemporary pop compositions. And, yes, with four immensely capable vocalists, six stylistically astute musicians and a tap dancing maniac, the ensemble found yesteryear a pretty cozy place to chart at least part of the evening from. But by the end of the night, the time tripping landed everyone in the present day for the most volcanically potent performance of the night.

First, the beginning – or rather, the past. The first three songs of the evening indeed roared back to somewhere around the ‘20s with a sense of vaudeville that was as pronounced as the jazz sensibility. It began with vocalist/emcee Rogelio Douglas, Jr. and tap dancer Matt Shields transforming the Michael Jackson staple “Thriller” into a slice of playful swing. Singer Dani Armstrong (who performed last night under the non de plume of Jack Dani) then injected “Toxic” with noir-seasoned textures and dynamics that were light years beyond the vocal ability of the song’s originator, Britney Spears. Then PMJ newcomer Therese Curatolo led a charge of swing that fell somewhere between tango and klezmer on a makeover of Billie Eilish’s “bad guy.” Actually, the latter’s foremost accomplishment was wiping clean the original’s vacuous attitude and robotic vocal detachment so Curatolo could inject the tune with some vampish humanity.

The rest of the program maintained the inventive, retro-inclined cabaret spirit with a few technical glitches (a muddy sound mix at the show’s onset and some intrusive rings of feedback in the second set) until the past caught up with the present during the program’s encore.

Here, Armstrong grabbed hold of the Sia hit “Chandelier” in a version that didn’t so much echo the ‘20s as simply free the song from the synthesized confines of its original version. In short, it was presented as an organically orchestrated pop work that Armstrong took to the heavens with earnest, operatic vocal drama. No, it didn’t possess any obvious atmosphere of nostalgia or even the campy pleasantries that distinguished the rest of the show. It was rather a straight-up arrangement with a commanding vocal presence that, frankly, put the original to shame. And that’s a pop effect that works like magic in any era.



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