in performance: railbird, day two

Tyler Childers performing Sunday evening at Keeneland as part of Railbird. Herald-Leader staff photo by Ryan Hermens.

“Man, it’s good to be here today,” Tyler Childers remarked as the inaugural Railbird festival headed down the home stretch on Sunday evening.

For the Lawrence County native, now a national sensation thanks to a sense of songcraft and performance command rooted in a narrative-rich yet vintage flavored brand of country music, what was at hand was essentially a homecoming. It was also the zenith of a major music event that gave every indication over the weekend of becoming an annual happening.

Despite the hero status now afforded him, Childers hasn’t altered his sound or song sensibility much. The Railbird set offered giddy tunes that capitalized on clever, unspoiled storytelling (“Country Squire”), darker rural sagas that read like ghost stories in their sense of very human drama (“Creeker,” “House Fire”) and parables with generous nods to his Bluegrass heritage (“Redneck Romeo”). Toss in a white-hot band featuring fellow Kentuckian Jesse Wells (“Jack of all trades, master of most,” as described by Childers) and the world class homecoming was complete.

Woe be to anyone who had follow Childers on such an occasion. On Sunday, that duty fell to headliner Hozier, an Irish vocalist and song stylist who held his own by transforming tunes that existed as contained pop/folk reveries on recordings (“What Would I,” “Dinner and Diatribes,” “Nina Cried Power”) and expanded them into massive, choral sounding explorations onstage. It was suitably anthemic Railbird finale.

The evening was ushered in with an intriguing set from Gary Clark Jr. A guitar slinger with an honest, robust intensity, he has evolved into a resourceful soul stylist. Several heroes came to mind while watching him play, but none so vividly as Curtis Mayfield. Part of that came from the topicality of “Feed the Babies,” “Got to Get Up” and other works from his new “This Land” album. But there was also the convincing soul falsetto Clark regularly utilized to more exactly recall Mayfield’s spirit. Then again, the dub groove he sunk into for “Feelin’ Like a Million” was pretty cool, too.

Watching Paul Janeway lead St. Paul and the Broken Bones during the heart of a hot August afternoon dressed in a shiny, layered choir robe was like experiencing heat stroke in motion. But Janeway was in no way compromised as he summoned a soul manifesto that shifted from the Atlantic-era R&B of “Grass is Greener” to the ‘70s wah-wah pop-soul of “Convex” to a modestly apocalyptic sermon draped in unabashed disco titled “GotItBad” (“We are just bruised fruit falling from the tree; God is a gambler who can’t set us free”).

Before that was a scorched, woozy and essentially by-rote set from Lucinda Williams that unfolded like a hangover. Never one for spit and polish, Williams didn’t mind beating up on her material. Some stung succinctly on impact (“Real Live Bleeding Fingers and Guitar Strings” and “Unsuffer Me”) while others rocked the great outdoors proudly (“Honey Bee,” Skip James’ “Hard Time Killing Floor Blues”).

Then there was the sleeper act of the day – Aoife O’Donovan, Sarah Jarosz and Sara Watkins performing collectively as I’m With Her. Their hour-long, early afternoon set was full of wintry folk delicacy (“Call My Name” and “See You Around”) that eventually succumbed to a cover gallery highlighting the trio’s far-reaching influences (Vampire Weekend’s “Hannah Hunt,” Bill Monroe’s “Toy Heart” and Joni Mitchell’s “Carey”).

“Thank you,” O’Donovan told the Railbird audience, “for getting sunburn in the name of music.”



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