in performance: regina carter and xavier davis

Regina Carter.

The depth and imagination of Regina Carter’s playing Friday evening at First Presbyterian Church came not in her stunning technical command on violin, her equally arresting tone or even her extraordinary phrasing – although all of those attributes certainly propelled this final performance in the current seasons of the Music for Mission program and Origin Jazz Series.

No, what fascinated above all was the communication she established with longtime pianist Xavier Davis. Near the duo program’s intermission, the two slipped out of their otherwise traditional and complimentary roles of featured artist and accompanist by engaging in a level of sparring where each player pushed the other. There were hints of gospel and swing, but mostly it was an exchange of immediacy – a series of skirmishes, skips and slaps that established a playfulness and communal spirit that countered the concert’s abundant musicality. Carter and Davis seemed thrilled by the dialogue with each beaming broad smiles as the set closed.

Such conversing took on many forms throughout the performance. On Astor Piazzolla’s “Oblivion,” the duo’s mutual lyricism grew achingly subtle with classical, gypsy and, of course, tango flourishes. For the Stevie Wonder staple “Higher Ground,” the music grew out of funky left hand piano rumbles by Davis that distantly echoed the mischievousness and bent rhythms of Bud Powell while Carter went on a field trip, incorporating an almost Eastern accent at times into the groove. And on the show-opening take on “When I Grow Too Old to Dream” (inspired by Nat King Cole’s 1957 version with violinist Stuff Smith), the duo format for the evening was discreetly established in the luxurious pace and tone of Carter’s playing along with the remarkably keen and complimentary support Davis supplied in his comping.

Want more? How about a summery and suitably conversational version of Hoagy Carmichael’s somewhat obscure “Judy” that Carter introduced by playing a recorded snippet on her phone of the composer singing the tune. The song later faded to a beautiful piano whisper from Davis that set the stage for Carter’s reentrance with a delicate, distant tone that resembled a whistle more than a violin.

Oh, and how about a gentle and spacious reading of “Softly As In a Morning Sunrise” that ended the show by gliding into a requiem-like “Danny Boy” and a beautifully stoic “Amazing Grace” where the pastoral quiet of the church served as a silent but profound participant. You get the picture, right?



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