in performance: keigo hirakawa trio

keigo hirakawa.

It was until a set closing version of “Stardust” that Keigo Hirakawa took a musical breath. Up to that point, his swiftly paced and even more briskly executed performance Saturday evening at Tee Dee’s Bluegrass Progressive Lounge (specifically, the first of two sets in this Origins Jazz Series presentation) darted along with a light, effortless but unrelenting drive.

In terms of flow, this Tokyo-born, but Dayton-based pianist, was like McCoy Tyner, but without the latter’s muscular, modal intensity. Nearly every corner of the seven compositions he played were filled with melodic swing and boppish mischief. It was technically dazzling, from the full – make that, very full – runs that distinguished the set opening “Myth of Poseidon” to the discreetly forceful fluidity and rhythmic playfulness that sparked the closing “Unmarked Path.”

But it wasn’t until “Stardust” that one sensed just how exhausting the performance was at times. There was likely a classical upbringing at work in Hirakawa’s playing to go along with an obvious and good-hearted playfulness. On an earlier cover of “Summertime,” Hirahawa threw out the playbook entirely, utilizing a tasteful bossa-flavored groove before slamming on the accelerator. On “Stardust,” though, you got a sense of space and dynamics that reached beyond the technical acceleration.

Bassist Eddie Brookshire and drummer Jeff Mellott had nuance to spare, especially Mellott, whose playing was full of light, but commanding color, whether it was through the tasteful propulsion underneath the piano attack on “Whatchamacallit” or the way he navigated through the turns and gradual melodic launch of “Home Somewhere.”

Brookshire’s playing was exquisite – what could be heard of it. Hirakawa played an electric piano, but with a sound that mimicked a grand as opposed to, say a Fender Rhodes. Still, the modest amplification and busy piano comping robbed the audience of the attractive detail in Brookshire’s soloing. It was only during the first half of “Summertime” that some of the rubbery depth of the bassist’s playing could be appreciated.

Obviously, an electric keyboard was favored for its portability, but a modification to the volume might have helped bring out the complete color of this fine trio. Hirokawa may have been the pilot, but this was a group where everyone deserved to be fully heard.



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