in performance: boneshaker/timothee quost

Boneshaker. From left, Paal-Nilssen-Love, Mars Williams and Kent Kessler. Photo by Marek Lazarsk.

There is a certain irony in the fact that Boneshaker titled its new album “Fake Music.” Well, there’s parody at work, too, given the redacted text that serves as cover art. But when giving a listen to this Chicago trio, which offered a very inviting set Friday evening at the Kentucky for Kentucky Fun Mall for the Outside the Spotlight Series, you sensed at once how fake the “Fake” element was. Led by saxophonist Mars Williams and sporting two veterans of numerous OTS performances, drummer Paal Nilssen-Love and bassist Kent Kessler, Boneshaker summoned a sense of jazz interplay and immediacy that was real, present and vital.

While Williams has long demonstrated an instrumental potency that borders on the volcanic, this performance was distinguished by considerable instrumental dynamics. In a single 45 improvisation that formed the foundation of the concert (although it was likely a mash-up of several singular pieces, as is the case on “Fake Music”), the trio took flight with the blues. But the music also remained open enough for the drive of Kessler and Nilssen-Love to fortify Williams’ more daring runs on tenor sax. From there, the sounds continually shifted from slow to brisk, from dense to sparse and from a hearty shout to a bare whisper. At times, that meant the trio broke off into various duet formations, highlighted by a quiet exchange between Kessler on bowed bass and Williams on alto sax.

The vocabulary was considerable, as well, whether it was displayed by Nilssen-Love doubling the rhythm on shakers for a Pharoah Sanders-like feel or Williams coloring sections with kalimba, percussive bells and even squeaky toys. That this entire collage returned to earth with a soulful but underscored groove cemented the trio’s broad sense of invention.

French trumpeter Timothee Quost opened with a half-hour improvisation that was better appreciated as a performance piece than a purely musical one. Playing on a novel makeshift stage in the bed of a pickup truck parked on the store floor of the Fun Mall, his performance was largely an abstract fabric of electronic pops and flourishes that seldom called on the trumpet’s natural sound. That, luckily, was placed on display when he joined Boneshaker at the show’s end, trading aggressive stabs with Williams and generally enhancing the trio’s already resourceful musical arsenal.

 



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