the musical stew of the wood brothers

The Wood Brothers: Jano Rix, Oliver Wood, Chris Wood. Photo by Alysse Gafkjen.

Digging into a Wood Brothers tune pretty much requires a check list.

A slinky guitar riff born out of the blues but industrious enough to fit most any roots-savvy groove? Check that. Brother Oliver Wood has you covered.

A rubbery bass line that sounds fittingly rustic yet is soulfully funky enough to always seem in motion? Check that. Brother Chris Wood is on the job when then kind of combo commences.

A percussion charge that can sound jagged and loose on one tune but rugged enough on another to fuel a solemn shuffle? Check that. Non-sibling Wood Brother Jano Rix is the guy keeping that groove going.

Smack all that together and you have the recipe the Wood Brothers have been following for the past 14 years. From the earthy tunes offered on “Live at Tonic,” a now out-of-print 2005 EP disc of the band’s very first performance (cut when Oliver and Chris played as a duo) to the ultra-indie design of 2018’s “One Drop of Truth,” a record the trio lineup cut and produced on its own without outside guests, the music of Wood Brothers has been a fresh but largely borderless blend of blues, funk, jam-friendly folk and jubilant rock and soul.

Oliver Wood, however, doesn’t play favorites. He sees all these colliding genres as one musical language.

“It’s just part of the palette with all of the different influences,” he said. “When you have three different guys who have overlapping tastes, different elements are brought in that we feel passionate about. I think, as in any band, that creates a distinctive sound. It’s like it’s a stew or a recipe that is unique to that band. Other people do that, too, but we have our own take on it. We put it together and it’s our little stew.”

A Colorado native, Oliver Wood spun off to Atlanta, landing in the blues band of guitarist Tinsley Ellis and eventually the roots music troupe King Johnson. Chris Wood landed at the New England Conservatory of Music before moving to New York and eventual membership in the popular avant jazz, jam and funk collective Medeski Martin & Wood. Rix, who utilizes a conventional drum kit as well as a modified guitar called a shuitar that is played as a percussion instrument, made the Wood Brothers a trio in 2011.

“Jano has been with us for seven years now, so his role has evolved,” Oliver Wood said. “He helped create some of the real signature noises you hear coming off the stage and the records. From the beginning, he totally fit us.

“I think when musicians get together, they sort of meet in the middle. They just kind of take awhile. With my brother and myself, it was instant just because we grew up together. With Jano or any other member, it takes a little longer. But eventually you get there. You meet in the middle and find a new language where you connect eventually. The way you wind up communicating with that musical language is really cool.”

Though “One Drop a Truth” was a purposely self-contained effort, the Wood Brothers have long been open to the idea of collaboration. Americana favorite Buddy Miller produced the band’s 2013 album “The Muse” while the Wood Brothers found themselves jamming with Hot Tuna and Tedeschi Trucks Band on the latter’s 2017 Wheel of Soul Tour.

But the band’s hybrid sound remains very much its own in any setting. Oliver Wood said that’s a result of unavoidably emulating the rock and soul sounds of the stylists that came before them. Then again, the singer admitted that’s standard operating procedure for most any artist.

“I’m a Ray Charles fan, but I’ll never sound like Ray Charles,” he said. “I’ll probably try some twisted, lame version of it that ends up morphing into something cool. A lot of my heroes did that, like the (Rolling) Stones. They tried to imitate the American blues guys and ended up with their own sound. There are countless examples of that.

“I think that’s how people’s original voices come out. It starts by emulating. They may fail to some degree, but their own personalities emerge. I think we all do that. Take a group of guys that are all doing that to some degree and you find that music is in your DNA.”

The Wood Brothers and Nicole Atkins perform at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 24 at the Kentucky Theatre, 214 E. Main. Tickets: $25. Call 859-231-7924 or go to kentuckytheater.com.

 

 



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