Archive for July, 2017

graham nash: still changing the world a song at a time

graham nash. photo by amy grantham.

In the chorus to one of his most acclaimed songs, Graham Nash designs the chorus as an affirmation, a chant against a social and political climate ripe with unrest.

The tune was “Chicago.” The year was 1971, although the tune was written in the aftermath of conflict that arose out of the Democratic National Convention three years earlier. The chorus was almost child-like in its simplicity.

“We can change the world.”

Now at age 75, Nash stands by the credo. Even though the world – his own as well as the one that surrounds him – has undeniably shifted, he stills believes in the power of a singular voice.

“Let me give you an example,” Nash said. “Do you know who Frank Wills is? He was a guard at the Watergate hotel. One night he was sitting there at his desk with a little nine inch black and white television showing a basketball game. He went on his rounds and saw that there was tape keeping a door open. Now, he’s faced with a decision. ‘Do I check it out or do I go back to my game and make believe everything’s fine?’ He made the decision to check it out. I mean, that brought down the President of the United States. You can absolutely change the world, even if it’s only your world.”

The changes in Nash’s world have been considerable in recent years. In his personal life, the two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee divorced his wife of 38 years, moved to New York and formed a new relationship with photographer Amy Grantham. On the professional front, the heralded folk-rock trio of Crosby, Stills & Nash, after an on-again/off-again run of over 45 years, crashed to the ground following a dispute with longtime partner David Crosby. Those events and more informed Nash’s first solo album in 14 years, “This Path Tonight.”

“I make music that comes from my heart,” Nash said. “I came to New York and fell in love with a beautiful photographer. Actually, the very first picture that Amy ever took of me became the album cover.”

Touring continuously since the record’s release in April of 2016, Nash has been performing in a duo setting with guitarist Shane Fontayne, whose extensive credits includes tenures with Bruce Springsteen, Sting and Lone Justice. While the resulting shows have understandably emphasized songs from “This Path Tonight,” the repertoire reaches back to his pre-CSN tenure with The Hollies. In a career known for songs like “Our House,” “Teach Your Children” and “Cathedral,” is it difficult to get an audience to give attention to Nash’s newer music?

“I’m finding the people coming to see us are very cognizant of who I am,” Nash said. “I want them to enjoy music from when I was first writing music. The last tour I did started with ‘Bus Stop.’ This tour, I’m starting with ‘On a Carousel’ (the tunes were hits for The Hollies in 1966 and 1967, respectively). People are loving it. Those songs, they’re not particularly brain scratchers in terms of message, but they’re fun pop songs that make you feel good because you bring in all this memory of your youth into play. Not only do audiences understand that I sang in The Hollies and I made pop records for years before I met David and Stephen (Stills), they are also responding to this new stuff brilliantly. I couldn’t be happier.”
Forming Crosby, Stills & Nash involved sacrifice, though. He left everything – his home, his marriage, his band and nearly all his belongings – in his native England to move to Southern California to begin the group.

“Let’s just think about what I did. I left my incredibly popular band that, when I was with them, had at least 15 or 16 Top 20 hits. I left my bank account. I left my equipment. I left my first wife, although we were going to get divorced anyway. Hearing me and David and Stephen sing… that was it for me. That’s how powerful that sound was. That’s how powerful three voices sounding like one voice was. It brought me to America. It made me give up my entire life.”

Nash didn’t shy away from discussing his current rift with Crosby, which stems from disparaging remarks the latter made about Neil Young, CSN’s frequent fourth member, and his relationship with actress Daryl Hannah after divorcing his longtime wife – a situation that largely mirrored events in Nash’s life. Does the quarrel mean CSN is a dead proposition as a performance unit?

“At the moment now, yes,” Nash said. “David was very, very unkind. You may not agree with what your friends do, but you can kind of keep that to yourself. You don’t go on national radio and talk about Neil like that. That’s insane. And let me tell you, Neil was very upset because this came at a very fragile point. I completely understand because I just went through the same thing. For one of his (Young’s) friends to say that publicly was powerfully cruel.”

With such a championed artistic history to his credit, Nash is not standing still. His mission remains the same as it was in the ‘60s – to change the world one song at a time.

“I’m on the road right now, writing every day for another record. What’s in my future? More love. More peace. So yeah, I’m still alive.”

Graham Nash performs 7:30 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Lexington Opera House, 401 West Short St. Tickets: $55, $65. Call 800-745-3000, 859-233-3535 or go to ticketmaster.com.

in performance: roger mcguinn

roger mcguinn.

It’s a good bet the patrons that packed the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center earlier tonight to hear Roger McGuinn perform had nostalgia in mind. To that end, the featured artist for the 900th taping of the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour did not disappoint. But McGuinn’s sense of nostalgia differed somewhat from what many in the audience likely envisioned.

Instead of relying on his esteemed history as guitarist, mainstay member and principal composer for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame troupe The Byrds, McGuinn took a journey into a deeper and more personal past. As has been his mission for the past two decades, he devoted much of his nine song set to traditional folk songs, the kind that inspired him long before The Byrds took flight. But instead of a late 1950s/early 1960s student of music passed down by the likes of Bob Gibson and others, McGuinn is now an elder scholar and preservationist, having recorded numerous volumes of traditional songs in an effort to keep the form alive.

Likewise, pop audiences may musically identify with McGuinn through the 12 string electric Richenbacker guitar sound that helped define the rock, psychedelic and, eventually, country paths The Byrds followed. Tonight, though, he brought songs like “Well, Well, Well,” a lightning paced “Rock Island Line” and a variety of sea shanties highlighted by “Leave Her, Johnny” to life on a unique 7 string acoustic guitar that proved very serviceable as a rhythmic device as well as, in the few times the music called for it (a suitably blues-driven “St James Infirmary,” being one), a distinctive lead instrument.

As a vocalist, McGuinn can’t help but show his years. His higher register has become more reedy and frail – an inevitability, one supposes, of age (he turned 75 earlier this month). But the traditional material wasn’t always in need of spit and polish. “The Preacher and the Bear,” for instance, seemed to thrive with a tone that was conversationally whimsical with instrumentation (in this case, 5 string banjo) and credibly rustic with the singing.

Outside of the new original composition “Edge of Water,” which was largely indistinguishable from the traditional shanties in the set, McGuinn exited his folk turf only twice. In both cases, it was to acknowledge briefly the legacy of The Byrds with involving, warm-hearted readings of “Turn! Turn! Turn!” and “My Back Pages.”

The latter, one of many Bob Dylan songs popularized by the band, seemed quite telling of the present day McGuinn, especially in a chorus that viewed age and maturity in purely figurative terms. “I was so much older then,” the chorus went. “I’m younger than that now.”

 

in performance: wheels of soul tour featuring tedeschi trucks band, the wood brothers and hot tuna

the husband and wife guitar team of derek trucks and susan tedeschi. photo by stuart levine.

The annual Wheels of Soul Tour, the multi-act bill assembled and headlined by the Tedeschi Trucks Band, again lived up to it still-young reputation as one of the summer’s more appealing concert attractions last night at the PNC Pavilion in Cincinnati. Now in its third year, the tour has established a reputation not only as a versed showcase for old school Americana and soul but for its largely familial design. This year’s lineup, featuring Hot Tuna and the Wood Brothers with TTB again at the head of the table, was a tad more streamlined without as much crossover involvement that made its two previous incarnations so memorable. But every sweaty note delivered in the near 90 degree temps was still a delight.

The evening-opening Hot Tuna was largely treated with sage-like respect by the two other bands, mostly because founding members Jorma Kaukonen, 76, and Jack Casady, 73, have been a touring team since the first days of the Jefferson Airplane in the mid 1960s. Kaukonen wasted no time in reaching back to that legacy by opening the 45 minute set with “Trial by Fire” from the Airplane’s 1972 swansong record “Long John Silver.” The tune reintroduced Kaukonen’s unassuming but very potent profile as an electric guitarist (most of his regional concerts in recent years have featured him in predominantly acoustic settings). Backed by Casady’s bass work, which regularly stepped out of the shadows to provide remarkably instinctive counterpoint to the set’s blues and boogie focus, and the efficient drive of current Tuna drummer Justin Guip, Kaukonen gave resourceful power trio treatment to obscurities like 1979’s wistful “Roads & Roads &” and well as the blues chestnut “Come Back Baby” the latter of which the guitarist still breathes honest, electric intensity into after 50 years of playing it.

The Wood Brothers – guitarist/vocalist Oliver, bassist Chris and percussionist/unofficial sibling Jano Rix – followed with a flexible trio set of what it called simply “American” music. That translated into the roots directed pop of the set opening “I Got Loaded” and “Shoofly Pie” that had Rix slapping out beats on the guitar-like shuitar, the merry New Orleans-flavored soul funk jam “One More Day” that sent Chris Wood (who had surgery as recently as last fall for an intestinal blockage) flying about the stage in a slippery dervish of a dance and a cover of The Band’s “Ophelia” that encapsulated Oliver Wood’s high tenor singing as well as the trio’s knowing Americana feel. But the highlight came when “mentors” (Oliver’s description) Kaukonen and Casady returned for the Rev. Gary Davis classic “Death Don’t Have No Mercy.” The tune has been a Hot Tuna staple since the band’s beginnings in 1969, but last night it was presented as an appealingly ragged cross-generational jam session between the two bands.

The headlining Tedeschi Trucks Band sounded a bit more streamlined than in recent years. There wasn’t as much risk taking, the instrumental passages were briefer and the band solos were in somewhat shorter supply. Much of that can be explained to the absence of TTB mainstay Kofi Burbridge, who is off the road this summer recuperating from heart surgery. Carey Frank filled in capably on keyboards but without Burbridge’s abundant sense of invention. That said, there was a lot to enjoy in this 100 minute set. Three opening tunes from 2016’s “Let Me Get By” album (“I Want More,” “Right on Time” and “Don’t Know What It Means”) stressed all of the TTB’s strengths: the soul revue orchestration provided by a total of six singers and horn players, the band’s jubilant rhythm section (which included two drummers), Truck’s scholarly guitar sound (which ran from jazz to blues to elemental R&B riffing to Eastern improvisation) and, crowning it all, Tedeschi’s homey, soul-scratched singing. For the record, Tedeschi also reeducated the audience on her own worldly guitar abilities at several points.

The TTB’s fondness for vintage rock compositions again balanced out the original works. Two of the covers enlisted the evening’s other acts. The full Wood Brothers trio joined in on Paul McCartney’s Wings-era gem “Let Me Roll It” while Kaukonen and Casady again summoned the spirit of Jefferson Airplane by reaching back for 1967’s “3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds.” That one was a portrait of contrasts. Kaukonen and Trucks studiously exchanged solos laced with ample psychedelia while Casady seemed to having a field day anchoring the groove and reaffirming his past with the TTB’s youthful, large scale gusto.

in performance: nicole atkins/joselyn and the sweet compression

nicole atkins.

The second of two reviews of performances held Thursday evening, June 20:

“May my path be lit up by the bridges that I’ve burned.”

That very revealing line surfaced near the end of Nicole Atkins’ hour long pop odyssey last night at The Burl. It hailed from “A Dream Without Pain,” a tune that not so coincidentally concludes the Jersey-bred songstress’ new “Goodnight Rhonda Lee” album, which hits stores today. Like many of Atkins’ best compositions, the narrative outlined an empowerment that comes with a hefty price tag. The same was true for the torchier Jersey requiem “Love Living Here (Even When I Don’t),” the more epically scaled “A Little Crazy” (where the cocktail of empowerment and pathos led to a grand vocal unleashing of Atkins’ inner Orbison) and the stately assertions of “Listen Up.”

All of these songs hailed from “Goodnight Rhonda Lee,” as did much of the hour long set. While the audience turnout was meager, Atkins’ readings of these personality portraits, along with the glossary of pop melodies packaged with them (like the elegant “cha cha cha” strut of the record’s title tune), were inviting and arresting. A seemingly good natured performer, she seemed unfazed by the lean attendance, choosing to ignite vocals of varying intensity with a natural ease and clarity. That was also true for older works like the soul drenched “Cry Cry Cry” and the buoyantly desperate pop confection “Maybe Tonight.”

Atkins augmented her broadly American-sounding original material with a pair of curious European covers from 1972 – Can’s “Vitamin C” (a healthy blast of psychedelia that sounded anything but retro) and David Bowie’s “Moonage Daydream,” which ended the set with suitably continental splendor.

Complimenting this very appealing show was a stellar opening set by Joslyn and the Sweet Compression, a Lexington unit centered around the fearless vocals of Joslyn Hampton and a five member band bearing the same instrumental make-up as a vintage R&B revue, right down to the two-man horn team. But original tunes like “If I Break It Down” and “Sunday Driver,” along with covers of vintage gems like Funkadelic’s “Cosmic Slop,” opened a groove bag that touched on soul, blues, reggae-fied rhythm, funk and more. A fine, e engaging showcase by one of our own.

in performance: sam bush band

sam bush.

The first of two reviews of from performances held Thursday evening, June 20:

By this point, the home state heritage sitting at the heart of Sam Bush’s music is pretty much impossible to conceal. For his appearance last night at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center for the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour, such Kentucky bred charm was on unavoidable display. You heard it during the nine-song set in “Bowling Green,” a new tale of farmers and fiddlers named after Bush’s hometown, as well as in “This Heart of Mine,” a 1975 classic resurrected from his early years with New Grass Revival and a prototype tune for the modern string music Bush has helped pioneer through ensuing decades.

But what was so intriguing about this WoodSongs taping, where Bush was the only guest, was how natural the blend of tradition and progression sounded. Much of that came from an expert band that included the ultra tasteful banjo support of Scott Vestal and equally resourceful guitar work and harmony singing from Stephen Mougin. Ultimately, though, the catalyst for this program was Bush himself – a still-outgoing and personable presence whose love of stage performance remained obvious. Watching him deftly switch from mandolin to fiddle to slide mandolin, all while shifting styles and musical temperaments with each tune, was where the magic came in.

For the opening “Play By Your Own Rules,” his mandolin runs became a collective call to arms for his band which then neatly dispatched myriad string music colors with Vestal doing much of the heavy lifting. The aforementioned “Bowling Green” let Bush’s fiddle lead establish a more dramatically traditional air while “I Just Wanna Feel Something” offered perhaps the evening’s most dramatic departure from the string music norm – a groove constructed around very credible blues and funk.

The highlight, though, was when Bush circled back to the sound he is perhaps best known for. On the instrumental “Greenbrier” (which, like all of the previously mentioned songs save “This Heart of Mine,” hailed from Bush’s 2016 album “Storyman”), a darting, dancing mandolin lead led the band through the kind of jazz and groove-directed drive that essentially reinvented bluegrass over 35 years ago. Last night, it was also the sound of a musical titan returning home.

 

nicole atkins addresses her inner pop star

nicole atkins. photo by anna webber.

Let’s get one question out of the way before we go any further. Who is Rhonda Lee?

The fourth and newest album by Nicole Atkins – the Jersey songstress with towering vocal chops and the pop smarts as a writer and performer to put them to expert use – is titled “Goodnight Rhonda Lee.” Alright then, who in creation is Rhonda Lee?

Ah, but there’s the key. It turns out that’s exactly what Rhonda Lee is – a creation. She is, in effect, Atkins’ fictitiously evil twin – the character who acts with unapologetic recklessness. She is, if you will, a trouble child.

“She’s the girl who always has a little too much,” said Atkins, who makes her Lexington debut on Thursday (the night before the release date for “Goodnight Rhonda Lee”) at The Burl.

“You know when you have a friend that drinks too much and you give them a different name? That’s what’s she’s like. In my family, it’s when they tell me, ‘Oh, we’re having dinner tonight. Don’t bring Rhonda Lee.’”

Turns out, though, Rhonda Lee was making her presence quite known in Atkins’ life long before she was immortalized in song. Even as the singer was rewarded with a new and happy marriage as well as a move from her longstanding New Jersey/New York roots to Nashville, she was duking it out something fierce with her uneasy alter ego. Specifically, she was battling for sobriety on top of dealing with news that her father had been diagnosed with lung cancer.

On top of all that, she was facing an everyday artistic dilemma – maintaining a career that had been gathering momentum since the release of her debut album “Neptune City” a decade ago. Fueling such mounting visibility was a vocal charge that regularly summoned the spirits of pop giants like Roy Orbison and encompassed inspirations of vintage pop, soul and country but with a literary flair all her own.

“I was under the delusion that it mattered to keep putting things out and moving fast – you know, the fear that things could go away if I didn’t keep moving. But for this record, I really just wanted to take my time until every song was a song that I wanted to hear, a song that told a story about my life. I feel that this is the album that taught me how to be a good songwriter.

“I’ve always been really connected to that big crooner type of singing – you know, Roy Orbison or Jay Black, that kind of stuff, as well as classic country, soul music and rock music in the 1968 kind of vein. I didn’t think it was possible for me to make a record that combined those things. It wasn’t until three years had past and I had moved, gotten married and went through rehab that I kept saying, ‘I wish I could just move forward.’

“Then, while sitting and listening to the 16 songs I whittled down from maybe 100, my husband popped into the room and said, ‘You did it, babe.’ I said, ‘What?’ And he said, ‘You’ve got your soul record.’ It’s funny because sometimes I can’t see when things are done until somebody else steps in and tells me.”

Among the heroes in Atkins’ corner during writing sessions for “Goodnight Rhonda Lee” was veteran rock and pop stylist Chris Isaak. Longtime friends and touring mates, the two collaborated on one of the true gems of “Goodnight Rhonda Lee,’ the epically orchestrated and ultra Orbison-esque “A Little Crazy.”

“Chris was, like, ‘Your voice has this special thing that I don’t think you utilize enough. It’s kind of your superpower.’ When we were having burgers for lunch, I came up with this chorus that was kind of Righteous Brothers-ey. Then I was like, ‘Well, what do I write it about? I’m happily married now.’ Chris said, ‘Remember that horrible relationship you had when we were touring together? You got anything from that?’ I thought, ‘I have a lifetime of stuff from that.’

“I remember having an old boyfriend saying to me, ‘You know what your problem is? You’re defined by your music.’ Well, okay. I don’t think that’s a bad thing. I’m absolutely defined by that. It’s my life, no matter what happens. I won’t stop doing this until I can’t physically do it anymore. There’s no Plan B.”

Nicole Atkins with Joslyn and the Sweet Compression perform at 8 tonight (July 20) at The Burl, 375 Thompson Rd.  Tickets: $8, $10. Call: 859-447-8166 or go to theburlky.com.

in performance: forecastle saturday 2017

Greetings from Louisville. We were stationed at Forecastle through the evening hours on Saturday covering all the sounds abounding throughout Waterfront Park on the festival’s second day. Here is what we experienced.

james murphy of lcd soundsystem closes forecastle’s saturday bill.

9:59 p.m.: “You wanted a hit,” sang James Murphy as LCD Soundsystem dug into the evening dance party. “Maybe we don’t do hits.” Well, maybe they don’t. But Forecastle’s Saturday closer still offered a familiar groove sound built around a fascinating mix of programmed beats, analog synths, percussion and the wild range of Murphy’s potent vocals. With Nancy Whang still adding to the synth orchestration from centerstage, tunes like the set-opening “Yr City’s a Sucker” and the quirkily animated “Daft Punk is Playing at My House” emerged as densely arranged electronic rock pieces that heavily recalled the early ‘80s music of Roxy Music, Talking Heads, Devo and, in Murphy’s vocals, The Cure. But hits or no hits, the ensemble’s resulting music sounded proudly modern.

8:46 p.m.: As the temps cooled with the sunset on Forecastle Saturday, so did the music. The electronic drenched works of the New York collective Phantogram colored the twilight with a discreetly lush set of soundscapes. This wasn’t the usual push-button dance party, but a hybrid where founding members Sarah Barthel and Josh Carter added live vocals and guitar, respectively, to the heavily synthesized backdrops of “Destroyer” and “Answer.” Barthel’s singing was employed as a moodpiece device, a breathy though thin addition that worked best during the more overtly pop propulsion of “Cruel World” and the self-described “dance hit” groove of “Calling All.”

sturgill simpson, guitar hero.

7:55 p.m. – Meet Sturgill Simpson, guitar hero. By jettisoning the horn section that backed him onstage following the release of last year’s “A Sailor’s Guide to Earth” album and trimming what remained of his band to a lean quartet, the Kentucky country renegade opened his evening set with a reading of “Brace for Impact (Live a Little)” that roared on for 10 minutes, over half of which was devoted to long, winding guitar jams Simpson played over a thick, deliberate Southern groove. After that, the performance wound its way through psychedelic blues (“It Ain’t All Flowers”), Merle Haggard-level country reflection (“Breakers Roar”), a quietly ambient meditation that ignited into hotwired, churchy soul (“Welcome to Earth”) and a Prince-worthy guitar grind that opened out into a potent cover of the blues/boogie chestnut “Going Down.” All in all, a typically mighty and wonderfully combustible Simpson outing.

nathaniel rateliff convened an early evening soul revival.

5:50 p.m. – “Bow your heads and buckle your knees.” That was the request of Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats as the young rock/soul brigade dedicated “Boil and Fight” to the late Chuck Berry, right down to the tune’s joyous riff that recalled the rock forefather’s classic “Memphis.” What defined this vibrant set wasn’t so much the traditional charm it possessed, but the tired soul revue sentiment it avoided. Buoyed by a guitar sound and vocal lead that were both beautifully ragged, songs like the new “Coolin’ Out” and the comparatively vintage “Howling at Nothing” lavished naturally within honest rock and soul smarts.

5:14 p.m. – The afternoon’s big mash-up came courtesy of K-Flay, the Illinois songstress whose set blended dour pop musings with strong colors of electronica. “It’s Strange,” her 2015 collaboration with Louis the Child, was draped in synths and rhythmic loops while “High Enough” was served as a full blown, dance savvy pop confection. An interesting mix, even though K-Flay’s voice was nowhere near as arresting or distinctive as her onstage attitude.

j.d. mcpherson proved to be an early saturday highlight.

4:10 p.m. – Forecastle officially kicked into high gear with a typically rocking set by J.D. McPherson. The Oklahoma singer/guitarist again operated from a largely traditional playbook of retro-inclined pop, soul, blues and roots rock inspirations kicked off by the swirling guitar riff of “Bossy” before bowing to the merry sax drive of “Northside Gal,” the tremolo-boosted ‘50s flavor of “It Shook Me Up” and the freeflowing vintage pop flow of the new “Desperate Love.” The bar for the day has now been set.

3:21 p.m. – In a fit of performance irony, the Portland based Closner sisters Natalie, Allison and Meegan – collectively known as Joseph – let their opening tune, “Stay Awake,” emerge from a blast of fuzzed out bass. From there, layers of ambient-inclined folk morphed into the indie power pop charge of “Canyon” and “S.O.S. (Overboard).” Appealing harmonies, impressive performance zeal but pretty standardized material.

lucy dacus opening the mast stage saturday afternoon at forecastle. all herald-leader staff photos by rich copley.

2:57 p.m. –Virginia songsmith Lucy Dacus kicked off the music on the Mast Stage, the largest of Forecastle’s four performance areas, with a moody, atmospheric set full of often vulnerably inclined pop (“Map on a Wall”) that often reflected the very inward nature of her singing. Even with such afternoon reserve, it was nice to hear the guitars rev up to match the polite angst of “I Don’t Wanna Be Funny Anymore.”

 

vandaveer to be featured on new ringo starr album

ringo starr’s “give more love,” which features two songs with vandaveer, will be released in september.

Ringo and… Vandaveer?

Believe it. Among the many star guests featured on Ringo Starr’s upcoming “Give More Love” album will be the Lexington/Louisville folk/pop troupe Vandaveer. Mark Charles Heidinger (on vocals, guitar and bass), Rose Guerin (vocals), J. Tom Hnatow (resonator and electric guitars) and Robby Cosenza (drums) are featured on two of the album’s four bonus tracks, which are remakes of two Starr classics – the 1973 solo career-defining hit “Photograph” and 1968’s “Don’t Pass Me By,” originally cut for The Beatles’ self-titled 1968 album (“The White Album”). Lexington studio pro Duane Lundy produced and engineered both songs.

Vandaveer performed the same tunes at Starr’s annual Peace and Love event last year in front of the Capitol Records Tower in Hollywood.

Details of the recording were announced earlier today, Starr’s 77th birthday.

“Exactly one year ago, Rosie, Tom, Robby and I jetted out to LA to help Ringo celebrate his birthday,” Heidinger posted on Facebook this afternoon. “And today, this was just announced. Still can’t quite compute.”

“Give More Love” will be released in CD and digital formats on Sept. 15. A vinyl edition will follow on Sept. 15.

 


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