the duo purpose of colvin & earle

Colvin & Earle: Shawn Colvin (left) and Steve Earle. Photo by Alexandra Valenti.

Colvin & Earle: Steve Earle (left) and Shawn Colvin. Photo by Alexandra Valenti.

Pinpointing how Colvin & Earle became a formal artistic enterprise is tricky. The veteran songwriters have been admirers of each other’s music for decades, even to the point of Shawn Colvin recording a version of Steve Earle’s forlorn “Someday” on her “Cover Girl” album in 1994. But the comparatively recent decision to tour as a duo, which resulted in the June release of the aptly named “Colvin & Earle” album, was, as Colvin outlines, a two-fold process.

“It was my idea to put some shows together and do a little tour with Steve,” she said. “I was enjoying putting packages together where you would get together with an artist and no one would open or close. The show would be together. We would be together onstage the entire show, swapping songs, singing and playing on each other’s songs, telling stories and so on. It just sounded like something fun. Audiences really like that kind of thing, too. We would have kind of a package deal, two for the price of one.

“Then once we got into it, Steve felt that there was something really special going on and that we ought to make a record. So that was Steve’s idea, where it was my idea to pair us in the first place and do some concerts.”

To say “Colvin & Earle” is a collection of duets homogenizes what the two have intended. Duets, in today’s modern music context, usually translates into a cut-and-paste manner of recording with artists in different studios in different cities at different times. “Colvin & Earle” offers nine of its ten songs as full collaborations with both artists singing in unison throughout. Only one song, “The Way That We Do,” separates them within verses.

“We thought we could pull it off,” Colvin said of the approach. “We loved the way our voices blended and just thought, ‘Let’s don’t have it where you sing most of the verses and I’ll sing on the choruses, then we’ll switch it up.’ That was deliberate and it worked.”

Similarly, five out of the six original tunes on the album were jointly written. The other, the finale song “You’re Still Gone,” began with an idea passed along years ago by fellow songsmith Julie Miller that Colvin, and later Earle, added to.

“The approach was kind of similar for all the songs. It nearly always started with a musical idea from one of the two of us and the lyrics would develop from there. We just sat in a room and pounded them out.”

The remaining tunes were covers. Colvin suggested the blues/soul warhorse “Tobacco Road” and Emmylou Harris’ “Raise the Dead.” Earle brought in the Rolling Stones classic “Ruby Tuesday” and the 1964 Ian & Sylvia folk nugget (and 1965 pop hit by We Five) “You Were On My Mind.”

“They were just fun to sing,” Colvin remarked. “That was it. Steve’s term for it was ‘fantasy camp.’ I mean, who doesn’t want to sing ‘Ruby Tuesday?’ It’s not really a duet, but that was one of the things that was fun about doing these covers. We knew we wanted to sing together throughout the entirety of the songs, so I think that makes them a little bit different.”

While “Colvin & Earle” was recorded with a rustic ensemble immediacy courtesy of ace producer and guitarist Buddy Miller, the duo’s current shows jettison band support altogether. That allows Colvin & Earle to be strictly the product of Colvin and Earle.

“We go into our own catalogs a little bit so we can give the people what they want to hear. But we do stay onstage together the whole time and play everything on each other’s stuff that isn’t on the record. We perform the whole record as well, so it’s just the two of us.

“You know, we wrote and even recorded with the idea, with the feeling of necessity, that we could pull this off with just two instruments and two voices. That was really important to us, because that’s how we started when we did the shows together that jump started this whole thing. I feel like we accomplished that.”

Colvin & Earle perform at 7:30 p.m. July 26 at the Lexington Opera House, 401 W. Short. Tickets: $55.50. Call: 800-745-3000, 859-233-3535 or go to www.ticketmaster.com.



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