critic’s pick 248: pink floyd, ‘the endless river’

pink floydThe Endless River is the sound of Pink Floyd in the afterlife, the ruminations of a band dead for 20 years but exhumed to reassemble part of its past as a eulogy for one of its own.

What that boils down to is this. Floyd mainstays David Gilmour and Nick Mason filtered through some 20 hours of instrumental recordings left over from the band’s last studio album, 1994’s The Division Ball. Some were loose, informal jams, others were more spacious, completed soundscapes. Such remnants had gained strong sentimental value for the two as they represented not only what became Floyd’s final music but also the last recorded collaborations between guitarist Gilmour, drummer Mason and founding Floyd keyboardist Richard Wright. The latter died in 2008.

So what The Endless River constitutes is a collection of those instrumental fragments retooled with newly cut guitar and percussion parts. The heavily ambient and predominantly instrumental results serve as a wonderful epitaph not only to Wright’s long underappreciated contributions to the Pink Floyd catalog but to the band’s entire musical odyssey.

Longtime fans should be warned, however. This isn’t The Dark Side of the Moon, The Wall or even The Division Bell revisited. In fact, the only album The Endless River at all emulates is 1975’s Wish You Were Here – in particular, the synthesized symphony Shine On You Crazy Diamond (which was also a tribute to a fallen Floydian, Syd Barrett). Throughout The Endless River, Wright’s ethereal playing serves alternately as an orchestral foundation, a moody lead and a foil for the claps of Gilmour’s guitar thunder that erupt out of the calm.

That’s not to say the album doesn’t echo other spirits of Floydian past. It does, from the psychedelic beginnings of More and A Saucerful of Secrets referenced within the church organ mimicry of Autumn ’68 to the Meddle-like bursts of keyboards and percussion that pepper Eyes to Pearls to the layered orchestral tension of Allons-Y (2) that recalls the 1987 comeback album A Momentary Lapse of Reason.

Floyd bassist/lyricist Roger Waters is again absent from these sessions. But Gilmour steps out of the instrumental shadows for the album-closing affirmation of Louder Than Words, which offers The Endless River’s only vocal turn (save for Stephen Hawking’s spoken verse on Talkin’ Hawkin’). The tune picks up right where The Division Bell left off.

Though obviously not intended as any kind of milestone, The Endless River is an assured sonic sendoff to a legendary band, a near-forgotten musical era and, most of all, a true prog rock architect and friend.



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