Archive for December, 2010

critic's pick 154

Dan Hicks has never exactly been the sort of troubadour one would readily associate with holiday recordings. A veteran San Francisco hipster since the city’s ‘60s recasting as a psychedelic paradise, Hicks has long favored music that sounds too lyrically irreverent, too stylistically slapdash to convey any conventional seasonal reverence. And yet, here Hicks is with a delightful anecdote for all manner of holiday hoopla. On Crazy for Christmas, the singer and his longstanding gypsy cowboy swing troupe known as the Hot Licks, stick to the shuffling, mid-tempo blues and jazz (blazz?) they know best while steadfastly refusing to take Yuletide sentiment and spirit too seriously.

The album possesses a sort of rustic, rural feel informed by the Hot Licks’ wondrously indefinable swing. The album’s 12 tunes shuffle and wheeze along with a lightness steeped in jazz design and a vocal and lyrical tone that suggests vintage John Prine (but without Prine’s often darker narrative intent).

Hicks wrote about half of the tunes and liberally rearranged two others. Among the originals is a breezy but cautious confession of muted holiday jubilation titled I’ve Got Christmas by the Tail. Here, our man Hicks coyly celebrates the season but brushes off any intimation of holiday stress. “I’ll show Christmas just who’s boss,” he sings with the sort of slushy reflection that suggests happy hour has already come and gone. “If Christmas don’t like it, then it’s Christmas’ loss.”

More tolerant of holiday tradition is Under the Mistletoe, a more carefree ode to pending holiday romance (“Look up and dig, it’s tight green twig”).

The spry album opener Christmas Mornin’ (a variation of Hicks’ own Where’s the Money?) introduces the re-arranged works. But the cheery, brassy blues nugget Santa Gotta Choo Choo, which is borrowed from the swing gem Choo Choo Ch’Boogie, imagines holiday soirees along the trail on Christmas Eve (“There was a function at the junction; it was quiet insane”).

The closest Crazy for Christmas gets to something truly solemn is Carol of the Bells. But even here, Hicks and his vocal conspirators (credited, as always, as “The Lickettes”) scat their way through the tune, deflating it into music that slips easily into the sense of acoustic vaudevillian swing that encompasses the album. As a bonus, Hicks offers all the scats in printed form in the album’s lyric booklet. “Bob-a-day,” “bob-a-doo” and “bob-a-deel” seem to be especially favored phrases

Crazy for Christmas isn’t for everyone. Traditionalists might not savor its boozy demeanor, especially the hoarse mumbling pouring out of Hicks’ mouth that passes for singing. But with the holiday blitz heading into the home stretch and seasonal stress mounting by the day, Hicks has offered the year’s quintessential Yuletide chill pill.

American Express online Mortgage Center launched.(Company Business and Marketing)

Telecomworldwire April 7, 2000 American Express has launched Mortgage Center, an online resource for home-buyers. site american express online here american express online

The site contains financial tools and information to help borrowers find the correct mortgage for them. It was developed as part of a partnership with Prism Mortgage Company and combines the online technology with traditional customer service, letting users contact a mortgage consultant should they need any assistance.

Tools that are included in the online mortgage centre are a loan status check, an online calculator and a rate monitor amongst others.

((Comments on this story may be sent to tww.feedback@m2.com))

in performance: chris isaak

chris isaak.

chris isaak.

“Don’t lead me on,” said Chris Isaak to his enraptured audience early into last night’s mammoth 2 ¼ hour, 34 song performance at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

The veteran California song stylist and retro pop ambassador was only half joking. He was trying to get a feel for whether or not the crowd was going to stick by him if he took the show down some lengthy rock ‘n’ roll sideroads that would often stray far from his familiar hits.

To get a reply, he bolted from the stage and roamed into the crowd, serenading everyone he passed with Love Me Tender. After finding an empty seat to park in, and especially eager female fan to sit on his lap, the singer switched to a more seasonal Elvis Presley gem – Blue Christmas – before bounding back to the stage.

In fit and youthful voice and possessing a performance energy that defied his 54 years, Isaak blended the pop lessons of pioneers like Presley, Roy Orbison and Carl Perkins. But he also added in noir-like pop atmospherics that neatly complimented the almost playfully forlorn storylines ripe in a repertoire that pulled tunes from each of his 12 albums.

Sometimes the results were exercises in glorious sustain and cool, as in the sleek band groove that wrapped around Dancin’ and the lean rockabilly drive that ignited the show opening Lonely with a Broken Heart. Other roots-savvy exercises merrily boiled over into seriously electric rock, pop and soul – including the title track to Issak’s 1998 album Speak of the Devil (long one of the singer’s most underappreciated tunes) and the dirty, dirty, dirty Baby Did a Bad, Bad Thing with its mean, Slim Harpo-fortified boogie accent.

But it was a 45 minute encore session, complete with Issak donning his famed “suit of mirrors,” that threw the performance into overdrive. A few Issak originals (Blue Hotel and the comparatively sunny San Francisco Days) got the segment rolling. Then Isaak offered a hit parade of vintage cover tunes being considered for an upcoming album.

Having already taken stabs at music by the Louvin Brothers, Presley and James Brown earlier in the evening, Isaak used the encore to indulge in nearly a dozen consecutive covers by Perkins (Dixie Fried), Ray Price (the crisp country crooner Crazy Arms) and Sun Records-era Elvis (I Forgot to Remember to Forget).

The segment’s general spontaneity (Isaak kept making rolling motions with his hands as a signal for his band to line up one cover classic after another) seemed to befuddle a few audience patrons who were hoping for a little more of Isaak’s own fine material. And, indeed, originals like You Owe Me Some Kind of Love, Heart Shaped World and Western Stars were omitted. But hearing a roots music scholar rock out without a net on such pioneering tunes proved to be the sort of holiday gift even Santa would he envious of.

chris isaak, pt. 2: “ok, maybe a little guilt”

chris isaak.

chris isaak.

Soundtracks and scores weren’t the only ways Hollywood came to heighten the profile of Chris Isaak’s music. While Wild at Heart certainly introduced the world to Wicked Game, a music video featuring Isaak locking lips with supermodel Helena Christensen along a beach coast greatly expanded the song’s hit potential. Subsequent videos maintained Isaak’s pop popularity throughout the ‘90s.

“I think our first hits were in Europe, but the videos brought us all over,” Isaak said. “I was on tour when we had our first big video hit. I remember walking down the hall of the hotel and hearing my song coming out of every room as I passed. I spent a lot of time walking up and down the hall. It was a big kick.”

Isaak’s career has since taken him through two television series. Showtime’s The Chris Isaak Show was a fictional variation of a traditional talk/variety show (“It was like going back to high school, only this time I was popular”). A&E’s The Chris Isaak Hour was a more conventional music/interview show, aired in 2009.

But the lasting priority of Isaak’s career has always been stage work – specifically, the relationship he has developed with Silvertone and how their rock, rockabilly, country and swing drive resonates with an audience.

“I have had the same guys for over twenty five years,” Isaak said. “I am really proud of them.

“Kenney (Dale Johnson), my drummer, can swing a beat like nobody else and sing a bird out of a tree. Rolly (Rowland Salley) is a bass player that has hits of his own (including Killing the Blues, covered most recently on the Robert Plant/Alison Krauss album Raising Sand). My guitar man Hershel (Yatovitz) is good on anything with a string. I’m pretty sure he could take a solo on a yo-yo. Scotty (Plunkett), the piano player…sometimes I call for a certain song onstage just because I want to hear his piano solo. And giving salt and pepper to the whole thing is my Cuban conga player Rafael (Padilla).

“And the really amazing thing is we all get along with each other and love being onstage or on a bus together. It always amazes me to hear about bands that hate each other. That would make for a long day.”

But after a quarter century of wicked games and rock ‘n’ roll, what is the thrill like when Isaak brings Silvertone to the concert stage these days?

“It’s like sex but without all the devices and no guilt later. Well, okay… maybe a little guilt.

“I have my dream job, travel the world with my best friends and sing and make music. I used to throw hay or put tar on a roof all day. I can tell you I like singing way more.”

Chris Isaak performs at 7:30 tonight at the Singletary Center for the Arts. Andy Mason will open. Tickets are $40, $50, $60. Call (859) 257-4929 or go to www.singletarytickets.com

chris isaak, pt. 1: “we are not shy”

chris isaak.

chris isaak.

Chris Isaak is clear about one thing from the onset. As a stage performer, he is anything but reserved.

Sift through roughly 25 years worth of recordings – especially his moodier works like Heart Shaped World, Dancin’ or the career defining Wicked Game that express their vintage pop smarts though a sheen of almost ethereal cool – and you might think otherwise. But plug Isaak and his longtime band Silvertone in onstage and everything that fuels his rock ‘n’ roll world lights up like a Broadway marquee.

“We are not a band that shows up late in a dirty t shirt and plays a few songs whilst squinting at our shows,” said Isaak last weekend in an email interview. “We love to play live. And we put on a show. We talk to the crowd, we get out in the audience and have people up onstage, we mix it up with fast songs and ballads and the band is dressed in suits that James Brown would have wanted for his (band the Famous) Flames.

“I have one suit covered in mirrors that weighs thirty five pounds. We are not shy.”

At first glance, Isaak would seem the prototype pop star. A life-long Californian, he possesses the looks that would make you think he walked out of the same pop generation as Fabian. But the sophistication of his music has always been obvious. He is versed on rock and soul essentials, possessing the abandon of early Elvis Presley, the vocal range of a young Roy Orbison and the sort of dark guitar spirit that would do masters like Link Wray proud.

“I found a used 45 record in a junk store years ago,” Isaak said. “And when I played it the lights just went on. I knew. It was (the 1956 single) I’ll Never Let You Go by Elvis. Later, I found out that this record and all the other records I was crazy about were recorded by Sam Phillips. He discovered, or created, Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash. It’s an amazing list.

“I’m currently working on an album of this kind of American rock and roll. And like all great rock and roll we are practicing in my garage.”

It didn’t take long for Isaak’s modern view of vintage pop to attract attention in and out of the music industry. Warner Bros. released the first in a string of 10 albums in 1985. His debut recording, also named Silvertone, impressed director David Lynch enough to include two of its songs – Gone Ridin’ and Livin’ for Your Lover – in the soundtrack to his wickedly popular film Blue Velvet.

In the years to come, Isaak and/or his music would be featured regularly in movies by several groundbreaking directors, including Jonathan Demme (Isaak acted in a minor role in The Silence of the Lambs), Stanley Kubrick (who included one of Isaak’s finest songs, Baby Did a Bad Bad Thing in his last film, Eyes Wide Shut) and Bernardo Bertolucci (Issak acted alongside Keanu Reeves in Little Buddha).

But the Lynch connection was especially fruitful, with Isaak’s chartbusting Wicked Game landing prominently in the Wild at Heart soundtrack. The singer later acted with an all-star cast in Lynch’s Fire Walk With Me, a 1992 prequel to the cult TV series Twin Peaks.

“I have probably worked most with David Lynch over the years. He is an amazing guy who can do it all. He writes, directs, paints, makes furniture and is a very mellow, smart guy. I also got to be friends with John Waters, a director, playwright and card carrying nut in the greatest sense of the word. He is somebody who really doesn’t give a damn. He tells it like it is and always with a smile and an upbeat attitude.

“I think it’s always good to mix things up. But I have to say I spend way more time with a guitar than anything else. I love working in films. Who wouldn’t? But even when I’m making a film, I always bring my guitar and play when they have a break.”

Check back Saturday for the second part of our interview with Chris Isaak.

Chris Isaak performs at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 11 at the Singletary Center for the Arts. Andy Mason will open. Tickets are $40, $50, $60. Call (859) 257-4929 or go to www.singletarytickets.com

in performance: anonymous 4

anonymous 4: marsha genensky, ruth cunningham, jacqueline horner-kwiatek and susan hellauer

anonymous 4. from left: marsha genensky, ruth cunningham, jacqueline horner-kwiatek and susan hellauer

“Shine on.”

That was the salutation sung with typically unaffected reverence last night at Transylvania University’s Haggin Auditorium by Anonymous 4. It was a fitting finale, to be sure. In the stage debut of a Yuletide program that journeyed through centuries old music from Hungary, Ireland and England, the coda came from an encore performance of the country delicacy Beautiful Star of Bethelem penned by Knox Country songsmith Arthur Leroy Phipps.

That the acclaimed a capella troupe of Marsha Genensky, Ruth Cunningham, Susan Hellauer and Jacqueline Horner-Kwiatek, a group known primarily as an early music vocal ensemble, would bring its worldly singing to rest on Kentucky’s doorstep shouldn’t seem too surprising. It’s repertoire, especially of late, has taken rustic Americana turns (explore its 2006 album Gloryland for proof). And certainly one of the more audience-friendly moments during this 85 minute performance was an American variation of The Cherry Tree (which doubles as the title track to a new holiday CD by the ensemble) sung with a modest but effective Appalachian lilt by the Californaia-riased Genesky.

The Cherry Tree was one of four songs performed individually by each of the members that separated the 85 minute program, titled Noel: Four Centuries of Christmas, into five segments, each of which was devoted to a separate Yuletide recording Anonymous 4 has released over the past 17 years.

The other three introductory songs were English works hailing from the 15th century. Hellauer sang the carol Tydings trew to introduce a collection of medieval songs and motets from Hungary. Horner-Kwiatek used Song of the Nuns of Chester as a prelude to the more polyphonic singing of the liturgy Legends of St. Nicholas. Cunningham sang the lovely Lullay my child before a segment devoted to Wokum Yule, an album of predominantly traditional British carols.

The quartet presented the audience as much information as it could about the material, including contemporary translations of lyrics from Latin and Middle English. As such, the shuffling of programs was an almost continual aural backdrop for the evening. No matter. While the performance was true to Anonymous 4’s scholarly and exact approach to vocal ensemble singing, the centuries and styles often seemed to blend into music of vast atmospheric proportions.

Sure, the traditional Cornish carol Can wassel (Wassail Song) offered its holiday sentiment in broad, welcoming strokes. But the rest of the program possessed a wonderful lightness both elegant and ghostly.

“Unearthly” was a description penned in the program. No argument there. What Anonymous 4 delivered last night may have been occasionally picked from The Cherry Tree. But the overall musical scope seemed as timeless and magical as Christmas itself.

critic's pick 153

The music on two new traditionally minded holiday recordings by the Portland, Oregon collective The Christmas Revels and the pioneering British folk-rock troupe The Albion Band may seem stylistically incompatible on the surface. But the intent is quite like-minded – to view Christmas as more of a seasonal celebration than a purely spiritual one with centuries old inspirations as a guiding voice.

The Revels draw upon carols from a dozen “old world” countries over six centuries for its new Down Through the Winters album. Performed by Portland choruses, Renaissance bands, brass quintets and augmented by recitals of narratives and poetry, the recording is so traditional in scope as to be transportive.

Little of Winters is obvious. One of the few exceptions, The Holly and the Ivy, shifts from its usual chiming lyricism to a choral arrangement discovered in Herefordshire during the 1950s. Only the dark, chant like-Gaudete (curiously, a ‘70s pop hit for British folksters Steeleye Span) and the 12th century Irish-composed Wexford Carol qualify as “familiar.” Elsewhere, Winters draws inspiration from the sacred and the secular for a Yuletide spirit that is reverential but unspoiled.

The delights run from the angelic choral colors of Ave Maris Stella to the union of a 2001 sonnet of seasonal fortitude with a trio of Renaissance recorders playing an accompanying 14th century melody on The Year/Je Sui Aussi to the rustic French medieval string duo Offerat Ecclesia.

The Albion Band is a decades-old British folk enterprise founded by bassist Ashley Hutchings, who similarly formed two other cornerstone bands specializing in traditional folk as a springboard for contemporary pop and rock: Fairport Convention and, coincidentally, Steeleye Span.

The carefully titled Another Christmas Present from The Albion Band is actually a concert recording pulled from a 1986 performance from one of the last great touring line-ups of The Albion Band (with guitarist Phil Beer and singer Cathy Lesurf).

Unlike newer studio works by Hutchings’ similarly minded Albion Christmas Band, Another Christmas Present isn’t afraid to shy away from amplified tradition or even rock ‘n’ roll, as evidenced by The Official Branle, which is Ding Dong Merrily on High performed Morris dance-style on fiddle, melodeon (courtesy of Albion alumnus John Tams) and bells, and a suitably festive take on Chuck Berry’s Run Rudolph Run.

But the selection of wassails with narratives that, in one instance, view Christmas from the front lines of World War I, make Another Christmas Present a lively Yuletide throwback not only to the decade from which these performances were given but to the prior centuries and spirits that so lovingly inspired them.

U.S. Cellular buys Medford sports park naming rights.

Mail Tribune (Medford, OR) May 15, 2007 Byline: Meg Landers May 15–MEDFORD — The new, 132-acre sports park south of town will be named the U.S. Cellular Community Park, officials said Monday.

U.S. Cellular paid $650,000 for naming rights to the Medford Sports and Community Park for the next six years.

A public naming ceremony and unveiling of the logo is set for 11 a.m. Wednesday at the park.

“This is huge,” said Medford Parks and Recreation Director Brian Sjothun. “It is the largest naming rights per year for the state of Oregon.” Currently under construction, the $25 million park on Highway 99 will provide a range of sports facilities, access to nature walks and outdoor gathering spaces.

In addition, U.S. Cellular is donating 100 soccer balls. go to site brier creek movies

Medford Mayor Gary Wheeler said the company has renewal privileges if it wishes to contribute beyond the six years.

In recent years, U.S. Cellular has paid for the screen, projector and sound system for the Bear Creek Movies in the Park, as well as contributed thousands of dollars annually for the popular event.

“They’ve been very good corporate sponsors for the city of Medford,” said Wheeler.

Sjothun said it’s becoming more common for municipalities to sell naming rights to community facilities. He said he hopes similar partnerships can be created in Medford. here brier creek movies

“There are a lot more amenities within the park available for naming rights,” he said.

U.S. Cellular’s contribution is the latest boost to funding for the new park.

In December, the Medford City Council approved a $2.56 increase (the fee had been 31 cents) in the annual parks fee on city utility bills. The city sold $18.9 million in revenue bonds to fund construction of components of the park as well as a gymnasium at the Santo Community Center.

On Thursday the council is scheduled to award a $302,250 contract to Hardy Engineering and Associates to design part of the park. If approved, Hardy will design five field sports areas, a baseball field, an entry drive from Lowry Lane, parking and other features.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

in performance: steeldrivers/molly andrews

molly andrews.

molly andrews.

The final taping of the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour for 2010 journeyed down different sides of the same stylistic mountain last night at the Kentucky Theatre.

Leading the bill was The Steeldrivers, an inventive bluegrass troupe of predominantly Nashville-based players with strong elements of country, blues and, in the personage of its new guitarist and lead singer Gary Nichols, Southern steeped soul and R&B.

the steeldrivers: mike fleming, richard bailey, tammy rogers, mike henderson, gary nichols.

the steeldrivers: mike fleming, richard bailey, tammy rogers, mike henderson, gary nichols.

Last night, the four songs the band performed from its new Reckless album (along with a spry encore version of Blue Side of the Mountain from its self-titled 2008 debut record) touched discreetly upon those elements, whether it was through the steel and slide guitar colors of Mike Henderson during Where Rainbows Never Die (a tune nominated last week for a Grammy Award in a country category) or the natural scratch and grind in the Muscle Shoals-bred Nichols’ singing.

That said, The Steeldrivers held very much to tradition, especially in the dominating fiddle propulsion supplied by Tammy Rogers, the very tasteful banjo support of Richard Bailey and the clean three part harmonies supplied by Nichols, Rogers and bassist Mike Fleming.

The rhythmic turns in songs like Reckless Side of Me summoned a BR549-style of country which, in itself, is very traditional. But mostly, The Steeldrivers reflected an unforced string band sound that made a few stylistic rounds but still found its way easily to a comfortable bluegrass base.

Also on the WoodSongs bill last night was West Virginia mountain music singer Molly Andrews. Accompanying herself on dulcimer and guitar when she wasn’t performing full and confident a capella works, Andrews traveled the sorts of rural music routes that predated the inspirations piloting The Steeldrivers’ music.

It was hard when Andrews sang the war ballad Poor Solider to not think of Kentucky mountain music monarch Jean Ritchie. It was even harder when she took to the dulcimer and sang Now is the Cool of the Day, a spiritual penned and popularized by Ritchie.

But Andrews also had her own muses and causes to uphold. On Billy-O, she reflected a nicely brittle form of balladry that seemed more in line with British folk music until the tune dramatically detoured into an almost rag-style coda that brought the animation of such American guitar innovators as John Fahey to mind.

Finally, there was That 25 Cents You Paid, a testimonial that raised yet another learned voice against the controversial coal mining procedure known as mountaintop removal. She sang the song as a fervent but convincing sermon. When it concluded, Nichols from The Steeldrivers shot over to Andrews and offered accolades. There, in that snapshot moment of the two singers, both sides of the mountain converged.

2001 Asheville, North Carolina (AVL)

Weather Almanac January 1, 2004 2001 ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA (AVL) The city of Asheville is located on both banks of the French Broad River, near the center of the French Broad Basin. Upstream from Asheville, the valley runs south for 18 miles and then curves toward the south?ˆ“southwest. Downstream from the city, the valley is oriented toward the north?ˆ“northwest. Two miles upstream from the principal section of Asheville, the Swannanoa River joins the French Broad from the east. The entire valley is known as the Asheville Plateau, having an average elevation near 2,200 feet above sea level, and is flanked by mountain ridges to the east and west, whose peaks range from 2,000 to 4,400 feet above the valley floor. At the Carolina?ˆ“Tennessee border, about 25 miles north?ˆ“northwest of Asheville, a relatively high ridge of mountains blocks the northern end of the valley. Thirty miles south, the Blue Ridge Mountains form an escarpment, having a general elevation of about 2,700 feet above sea level. The tallest peaks near Asheville are Mt. Mitchell, 6,684 feet above sea level, 20 miles northeast of the city, and Big Pisgah Mountain, 5,72l feet above sea level, 16 miles to the southwest.

Asheville has a temperate, but invigorating, climate. Considerable variation in temperature often occurs from day to day in summer, as well as during the other seasons.

While the office was located in the city, the combination of roof exposure conditions and a smoke blanket, caused by inversions in temperature in the valley on quiet nights, resulted in higher early morning temperatures at City Office sites than were experienced nearer ground level in nearby rural areas. The growing season in this area is of sufficient length for commercial crops, the average length of freeze?ˆ“free period being about 195 days. The average last occurrence in spring of a temperature 32 degrees or lower is mid?ˆ“April and the average first occurrence in fall of 32 degrees is late October.

The orientation of the French Broad Valley appears to have a pronounced influence on the wind direction. Prevailing winds are from the northwest during all months of the year. Also, the shielding effect of the nearby mountain barriers apparently has a direct bearing on the annual amount of precipitation received in this vicinity. In an area northwest of Asheville, the average annual precipitation is the lowest in North Carolina. Precipitation increases sharply in all other directions, especially to the south and southwest.

Destructive events caused directly by meteorological conditions are infrequent. The most frequent, occurring at approximately 12?ˆ“year intervals, are floods on the French Broad River. These floods are usually associated with heavy rains caused by storms moving out of the Gulf of Mexico. Snowstorms which have seriously disrupted normal life in this community are infrequent. Hailstorms that cause property damage are extremely rare. here asheville north carolina

NORMALS, MEANS, AND EXTREMES ASHEVILLE, NC (AVL) LATITUDE:? ? ? ? LONGITUDE:? ? ? ? ELEVATION (FT):? ? ? ? TIME ZONE:? ? ? ? WBAN: 03812 35 26?ˆ? 09?ˆ? N? ? 82 32?ˆ? 21?ˆ? W? ? GRND:? ? 2171? ? BARO:? ? 2174? ? EASTERN (UTC + 5)
ELEMENT
POR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
YEAR
TEMPERATURE F
NORMAL DAILY MAXIMUM
30
46.5
50.0
59.2
67.8
75.0
80.4
83.0
82.1
76.9
68.3
59.3
50.3
66.6

MEAN DAILY MAXIMUM
44
47.7
51.3
58.8
68.2
75.3
81.6
84.4
83.2
77.2
68.7
58.4
50.5
67.1

HIGHEST DAILY MAXIMUM
37
80
78
83
89
93
96
96
100
92
86
81
78
100

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1999
1996
1985
1972
1996
1969
1988
1983
1998
1986
1974
1971
AUG 1983

MEAN OF EXTREME MAXS.
44
65.5
69.5
76.5
83.1
85.9
90.0
92.0
90.6
87.0
80.9
73.7
67.6
80.2

NORMAL DAILY MINIMUM
30
24.8
27.4
35.4
42.6
50.9
58.3
62.7
61.9
55.5
43.5
35.7
28.6
43.9

MEAN DAILY MINIMUM
44
26.6
28.6
34.7
42.3
50.5
58.4
62.8
61.8
55.0
43.0
34.4
28.8
43.9

LOWEST DAILY MINIMUM
37
-16
-2
2
22
28
35
44
42
30
21
8
-7
-16

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1985
1967
1993
1987
1989
1966
1988
1986
1967
1976
1970
1983
JAN 1985

MEAN OF EXTREME MINS.
44
8.1
11.5
19.1
27.5
35.1
45.5
54.2
52.0
40.6
27.7
19.1
11.9
29.4

NORMAL DRY BULB
30
35.7
38.7
47.4
55.2
63.0
69.4
72.8
72.0
66.2
55.9
47.5
39.5
55.3

MEAN DRY BULB
44
37.3
40.0
46.8
55.3
62.9
70.0
73.7
72.4
66.3
55.9
46.5
39.6
55.6

MEAN WET BULB
15
32.9
36.1
41.0
48.1
57.0
64.4
67.7
66.8
60.8
50.6
42.4
32.6
50.0

MEAN DEW POINT
15
27.0
29.5
33.9
41.0
52.8
61.4
65.0
64.5
58.0
46.0
36.9
27.1
45.3

NORMAL NO. DAYS WITH:

MAXIMUM 90
30
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
2.1
4.4
2.5
0.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
9.4

MAXIMUM 32
30
3.4
1.7
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
1.0
6.4

MINIMUM 32
30
23.9
20.8
13.3
4.3
0.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
*
4.4
13.0
20.7
100.7

MINIMUM 0
30
0.5
*
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.6
H/C
NORMAL HEATING DEG. DAYS
30
908
736
546
298
117
18
5
5
64
295
525
791
4308

NORMAL COOLING DEG. DAYS
30
0
0
0
0
55
150
247
222
100
13
0
0
787
RH
NORMAL (PERCENT)
30
73
70
68
66
75
79
82
84
84
78
75
74
76

HOUR 01 LST
30
80
78
79
78
89
93
95
96
96
91
86
82
87

HOUR 07 LST
30
85
84
85
85
92
94
96
98
97
94
88
86
90

HOUR 13 LST
30
59
56
53
50
56
59
63
64
64
57
57
59
58

HOUR 19 LST
30
67
62
60
56
66
70
74
78
81
74
70
70
69
S
PERCENT POSSIBLE SUNSHINE
32
55
59
61
66
61
62
60
54
56
62
58
55
59
W/O
MEAN NO. DAYS WITH:

HEAVY FOG(VISBY 1/4 MI)
38
4.1
2.9
2.1
2.5
5.2
8.3
8.8
12.3
11.2
7.9
4.2
4.5
74.0

THUNDERSTORMS
38
0.5
1.0
2.2
3.2
6.4
7.9
8.8
7.6
3.1
0.8
0.8
0.3
42.6
CLOUDINESS
MEAN:

SUNRISE-SUNSET (OKTAS)
32
5.0
4.8
4.9
4.6
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
4.8
4.0
4.3
4.7
4.8

MIDNIGHT-MIDNIGHT (OKTAS)
32
4.9
4.7
4.7
4.4
4.8
4.7
4.8
5.0
4.7
4.0
4.1
4.5
4.6

MEAN NO. DAYS WITH:

CLEAR
33
9.1
8.7
8.8
9.6
7.2
6.2
5.0
4.8
6.7
11.6
10.2
9.3
97.2

PARTLY CLOUDY
33
7.3
6.4
8.1
8.5
10.4
12.0
13.4
13.1
10.2
7.8
6.9
7.0
111.1

CLOUDY
33
14.6
13.2
14.1
11.8
13.3
11.8
11.7
12.2
12.2
10.7
11.9
13.7
151.2
PR
MEAN STATION PRESSURE(IN)
28
27.80
27.79
27.80
27.80
27.80
27.80
27.90
27.90
27.90
27.90
27.89
27.80
27.84

MEAN SEA-LEVEL PRES. (IN)
16
30.12
30.10
30.05
30.02
30.03
30.03
30.07
30.07
30.10
30.14
30.15
30.15
30.09
WINDS
MEAN SPEED (MPH)
37
9.3
9.2
9.2
8.7
6.9
5.9
5.9
5.5
5.6
6.8
8.1
8.8
7.5

PREVAIL. DIR (TENS OF DEGS)
30
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34
34

MAXIMUM 2-MINUTE:

SPEED (MPH)
5
45
43
47
38
33
32
41
41
45
33
36
33
47

DIR. (TENS OF DEGS)

34
33
32
32
32
32
33
30
36
32
32
34
32

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

2000
2001
2001
1997
2000
1998
2001
2000
1999
1997
1999
2001
MAR 2001

MAXIMUM 5-SECOND:

SPEED (MPH)
5
53
49
56
47
45
46
49
53
54
39
43
40
56

DIR. (TENS OF DEGS)

31
32
31
01
27
10
31
30
36
33
36
33
31

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

2000
2001
2001
2001
2000
2000
2001
2000
1999
2001
1999
2001
MAR 2001
PRECIPITATION
NORMAL (IN)
30
3.25
3.91
4.63
3.36
4.43
4.23
4.52
4.69
3.87
3.59
3.59
3.52
47.59

MAXIMUM MONTHLY (IN)
37
9.96
8.07
9.86
8.70
8.83
10.73
9.92
11.28
9.12
8.82
7.76
8.48
11.28

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1998
1990
1975
1998
1973
1989
1982
1967
1977
1990
1979
1973
AUG 1967

MINIMUM MONTHLY (IN)
37
0.45
0.44
0.77
0.25
1.06
0.90
0.46
0.52
0.16
0.00
1.19
0.16
0.00

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1981
1978
1985
1976
1988
1990
1986
1981
1984
2000
1981
1965
OCT 2000

MAXIMUM IN 24 HOURS (IN)
37
4.67
3.47
5.13
3.06
4.95
4.36
4.02
5.10
3.41
4.22
4.03
2.66
5.13

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1998
1982
1968
1973
1973
1997
1969
1990
1975
1995
1977
1973
MAR 1968

NORMAL NO. DAYS WITH:

PRECIPITATION 0.01
30
10.1
9.5
11.3
9.5
11.8
10.8
12.1
12.3
9.3
8.2
9.2
9.8
123.9

PRECIPITATION 1.00
30
0.6
0.8
1.2
1.0
1.2
0.9
1.1
1.0
1.0
0.9
1.1
1.0
11.8
SNOWFALL
NORMAL (IN)
30
5.0
5.3
2.5
0.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
T
0.8
1.9
16.2

MAXIMUM MONTHLY (IN)
37
17.6
25.5
18.2
11.5
T
T
T
T
0.0
T
9.6
16.3
25.5

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1966
1969
1993
1987
1993
1995
1994
1990

1993
1968
1971
FEB 1969

MAXIMUM IN 24 HOURS (IN)
37
14.0
11.7
16.5
11.5
T
T
T
T
0.0
T
5.7
16.3
16.5

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1988
1969
1993
1987

1993
1995
1994
1990
1993
1968
1971
MAR 1993

MAXIMUM SNOW DEPTH (IN)
42
14
13
18
12
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
14
18

YEAR OF OCCURRENCE

1988
1969
1993
1987

1968
1971
MAR 1993

NORMAL NO. DAYS WITH:

SNOWFALL 1.0
30
1.4
1.5
0.7
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.5
4.5
PRECIPITATION (inches) 2001 ASHEVILLE, NC (AVL)
YEAR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANNUAL
1972
3.57
2.02
3.19
1.49
6.63
6.54
4.66
1.88
5.29
4.44
4.42
3.89
48.02
1973
4.26
4.23
8.91
5.71
8.83
3.87
6.95
4.57
3.12
2.41
3.57
8.48
64.91
1974
3.44
4.24
3.18
4.99
5.58
3.73
3.93
7.34
4.13
1.28
4.22
2.38
48.44
1975
3.86
4.56
9.86
0.61
8.17
2.12
3.31
3.63
7.53
3.94
4.89
4.44
56.92
1976
3.51
2.20
4.96
0.25
8.67
5.51
3.18
4.23
3.50
5.59
1.58
4.05
47.23
1977
2.09
1.02
7.29
4.05
3.96
5.11
1.03
3.68
9.12
3.79
6.88
2.43
50.45
1978
7.47
0.44
5.22
2.97
4.65
2.29
0.63
6.91
2.57
0.30
2.49
4.32
40.26
1979
6.81
5.14
5.72
7.26
5.35
2.20
5.52
3.63
5.60
1.40
7.76
1.05
57.44
1980
2.85
0.53
8.26
4.77
4.54
4.68
2.21
2.38
4.36
2.62
3.04
0.59
40.83
1981
0.45
4.80
3.24
2.07
7.50
4.41
2.06
0.52
1.36
2.19
1.19
4.79
34.58
1982
5.41
7.02
1.92
3.62
3.78
3.98
9.92
1.73
1.33
3.48
4.59
4.04
50.82
1983
3.39
5.63
6.27
5.27
3.48
3.71
1.06
0.95
5.66
4.43
4.77
8.30
52.92
1984
2.36
6.43
4.82
4.05
6.62
3.69
5.88
5.02
0.16
2.73
2.61
1.34
45.71
1985
2.95
4.74
0.77
2.74
1.59
1.47
4.37
7.04
1.25
3.41
4.91
0.70
35.94
1986
1.11
1.85
2.75
0.57
3.55
1.28
0.46
6.10
3.15
4.19
5.28
4.28
34.57
1987
3.49
6.17
2.85
3.67
1.87
8.94
1.86
1.79
6.79
0.36
3.09
2.33
43.21
1988
3.71
0.88
1.31
3.46
1.06
0.94
2.65
1.78
2.79
3.12
3.47
1.41
26.58
1989
1.65
4.61
2.91
3.17
5.54
10.73
8.33
4.98
8.17
2.98
4.27
3.29
60.63
1990
3.27
8.07
5.95
1.96
5.09
0.90
6.55
7.78
1.43
8.82
1.55
4.50
55.87
1991
3.25
1.66
6.13
5.38
2.41
5.27
6.07
3.83
1.27
0.19
3.34
4.86
43.66
1992
3.08
3.66
3.52
3.99
6.18
6.62
1.10
7.64
3.15
4.15
7.24
3.71
54.04
1993
3.82
2.03
6.16
3.21
4.59
1.12
2.07
5.29
1.56
1.21
3.32
3.59
37.97
1994
5.35
5.11
7.52
3.30
1.74
5.89
6.76
6.01
5.33
4.27
3.15
3.03
57.46
1995
7.03
2.93
2.42
0.98
6.04
8.89
3.61
9.22
1.95
7.23
3.66
1.43
55.39
1996
7.22
2.71
3.36
2.00
2.55
3.54
4.83
6.68
5.22
0.68
4.45
3.92
47.16
1997
4.44
5.29
5.48
5.26
2.91
8.29
2.97
1.37
4.89
3.90
1.60
2.98
49.38
1998
9.96
6.38
3.71
8.70
2.22
3.64
1.97
2.23
1.62
1.79
2.76
3.04
48.02
1999
6.38
3.29
2.82
2.44
2.53
4.39
3.85
3.37
2.20
3.29
3.31
1.98
39.85
2000
3.10
2.33
3.82
5.11
1.27
2.78
2.84
4.45
3.27
0.00
4.25
2.37
35.59
2001
2.63
2.73
5.00
1.32
2.47
2.91
5.50
3.20
4.37
0.60
1.42
2.34
34.49
POR=36 YRS
3.70
3.78
4.56
3.40
4.31
4.25
4.21
4.56
3.65
3.20
3.52
3.35
46.49
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE (F) 2001 ASHEVILLE, NC (AVL)
YEAR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANNUAL
1972
42.1
37.6
46.5
55.8
61.2
66.5
72.3
72.5
69.0
55.0
45.5
45.2
55.8
1973
37.5
38.5
52.7
52.8
60.3
71.0
74.1
74.2
70.0
58.8
49.1
39.8
56.6
1974
48.2
40.5
51.1
54.9
64.2
66.7
72.9
72.3
65.7
54.6
47.4
40.3
56.6
1975
41.7
42.5
44.8
54.1
66.0
68.8
72.4
72.9
65.2
57.3
48.2
38.6
56.0
1976
33.6
45.3
50.6
54.9
59.5
68.1
71.2
70.2
63.1
51.5
41.2
36.2
53.8
1977
24.8
37.4
50.7
58.2
64.6
69.7
75.7
73.8
69.1
54.3
49.3
36.8
55.4
1978
29.3
33.4
45.9
56.8
62.0
71.1
73.4
74.1
70.0
55.7
51.8
41.0
55.4
1979
34.2
35.8
50.0
55.9
64.3
68.8
72.2
73.2
66.5
55.3
49.2
42.0
55.6
1980
40.5
35.1
46.2
56.5
64.8
71.7
77.5
74.8
70.2
54.7
47.1
39.6
56.6
1981
33.3
39.9
44.9
60.1
60.7
74.3
75.0
71.7
66.1
54.5
48.2
35.8
55.4
1982
32.3
41.2
50.0
53.6
67.3
71.5
74.6
71.7
64.5
56.3
47.1
44.9
56.3
1983
36.7
38.8
46.7
51.1
61.6
69.0
75.7
76.5
66.6
57.5
47.3
36.4
55.3
1984
34.0
40.5
44.8
51.7
59.9
70.0
70.6
71.6
62.8
62.7
43.1
46.3
54.8
1985
30.5
38.3
48.1
56.6
62.6
69.8
72.2
70.9
64.2
60.5
56.0
34.7
55.4
1986
35.0
42.2
46.0
56.0
63.3
71.7
76.1
70.9
68.0
57.4
50.7
39.8
56.4
1987
35.3
38.9
46.5
52.6
66.7
71.2
74.7
74.7
66.5
50.1
47.0
42.2
55.5
1988
32.1
37.1
47.1
54.6
61.1
69.3
73.8
74.6
66.3
50.2
46.7
38.7
54.3
1989
42.1
39.8
50.3
54.5
59.4
70.0
73.3
71.9
65.8
56.1
46.2
31.6
55.1
1990
42.8
45.6
50.4
54.2
63.3
70.9
73.8
73.9
67.6
57.8
49.9
45.5
58.0
1991
39.2
42.5
49.6
58.4
67.3
70.3
75.2
72.1
67.3
57.0
45.5
43.4
57.3
1992
40.7
44.2
46.3
55.9
59.9
68.1
74.9
70.4
67.8
54.4
46.2
39.2
55.7
1993
42.0
38.0
43.0
52.6
63.2
71.4
78.0
73.9
67.8
55.0
46.0
36.8
55.6
1994
32.4
40.6
47.3
58.5
60.2
72.6
73.1
71.4
64.6
55.9
50.1
43.6
55.9
1995
38.9
38.4
49.4
56.4
64.1
68.5
75.0
75.3
65.4
56.8
43.3
37.1
55.7
1996
35.3
39.5
41.4
53.6
66.1
69.6
72.0
71.5
64.4
55.8
42.3
40.5
54.3
1997
36.5
43.2
51.5
51.5
58.4
66.5
73.4
70.6
66.1
55.4
42.3
36.9
54.4
1998
41.3
42.2
43.9
54.1
66.5
71.7
74.9
73.4
70.3
58.3
49.2
43.9
57.5
1999
41.7
42.4
42.9
58.5
61.9
69.3
74.3
74.1
65.6
56.0
51.3
41.9
56.7
2000
36.0
43.3
49.9
53.0
66.2
70.6
72.8
71.7
65.2
57.2
44.6
32.5
55.3
2001
36.7
44.5
44.6
58.2
64.0
70.5
72.9
73.8
64.5
53.9
51.7
44.8
56.7
POR=37 YRS
36.6
39.6
46.9
55.3
62.9
69.9
73.6
72.5
66.5
55.9
47.0
39.9
55.6
REFERENCE NOTES: go to web site asheville north carolina

PAGE 1:

THE TEMPERATURE GRAPH SHOWS NORMAL MAXIMUM AND NORMAL MINIMUM DAILY TEMPERATURES (SOLID CURVES) AND THE ACTUAL DAILY HIGH AND LOW TEMPERATURES (VERTICAL BARS).

PAGE 2 AND 3:

H/C INDICATES HEATING AND COOLING DEGREE DAYS.

RH INDICATES RELATIVE HUMIDITY W/O INDICATES WEATHER AND OBSTRUCTIONS S INDICATES SUNSHINE.

PR INDICATES PRESSURE.

CLOUDINESS ON PAGE 3 IS THE SUM OF THE CEILOMETER AND SATELLITE DATA NOT TO EXCEED EIGHT EIGHTHS (OKTAS).

GENERAL:

T INDICATES TRACE PRECIPITATION, AN AMOUNT GREATER THAN ZERO BUT LESS THAN THE LOWEST REPORTABLE VALUE.

+ INDICATES THE VALUE ALSO OCCURS ON EARLIER DATES.

BLANK ENTRIES DENOTE MISSING OR UNREPORTED DATA.

NORMALS ARE 30?ˆ“YEAR AVERAGES (1961?ˆ“1990).

ASOS INDICATES AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEM.

PM INDICATES THE LAST DAY OF THE PREVIOUS MONTH.

POR (PERIOD OF RECORD) BEGINS WITH THE JANUARY DATA MONTH AND IS THE NUMBER OF YEARS USED TO COMPUTE THE MEAN. INDIVIDUAL MONTHS WITHIN THE POR MAY BE MISSING.

WHEN THE POR FOR A NORMAL IS LESS THAN 30 YEARS, THE NORMAL IS PROVISIONAL AND IS BASED ON THE NUMBER OF YEARS INDICATED.

0.* OR * INDICATES THE VALUE OR MEAN?ˆ“DAYS?ˆ“WITH IS BETWEEN 0.00 AND 0.05.

CLOUDINESS FOR ASOS STATIONS DIFFERS FROM THE NON?ˆ“ASOS OBSERVATION TAKEN BY A HUMAN OBSERVER. ASOS STATION CLOUDINESS IS BASED ON TIME?ˆ“AVERAGED CEILOMETER DATA FOR CLOUDS AT OR BELOW 12,000 FEET AND ON SATELLITE DATA FOR CLOUDS ABOVE 12,000 FEET.

THE NUMBER OF DAYS WITH CLEAR, PARTLY CLOUDY, AND CLOUDY CONDITIONS FOR ASOS STATIONS IS THE SUM OF THE CEILOMETER AND SATELLITE DATA FOR THE SUNRISE TO SUNSET PERIOD.

GENERAL CONTINUED:

CLEAR INDICATES 0?ˆ“2 OKTAS, PARTLY CLOUDY INDICATES 3?ˆ“6 OKTAS, AND CLOUDY INDICATES 7 OR 8 OKTAS. WHEN AT LEAST ONE OF THE ELEMENTS (CEILOMETER OR SATELLITE) IS MISSING, THE DAILY CLOUDINESS IS NOT COMPUTED.

WIND DIRECTION IS RECORDED IN TENS OF DEGREES (2 DIGITS) CLOCKWISE FROM TRUE NORTH. “00” INDICATES CALM. “36” INDICATES TRUE NORTH.

RESULTANT WIND IS THE VECTOR AVERAGE OF THE SPEED AND DIRECTION.

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IS THE SUM OF THE MEAN DAILY MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM TEMPERATURE DIVIDED BY 2.

SNOWFALL DATA COMPRISE ALL FORMS OF FROZEN PRECIPITATION, INCLUDING HAIL.

A HEATING (COOLING) DEGREE DAY IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE AND 65 F.

DRY BULB IS THE TEMPERATURE OF THE AMBIENT AIR.

DEW POINT IS THE TEMPERATURE TO WHICH THE AIR MUST BE COOLED TO ACHIEVE 100 PERCENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY.

WET BULB IS THE TEMPERATURE THE AIR WOULD HAVE IF THE MOISTURE CONTENT WAS INCREASED TO 100 PERCENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY.

ON JULY 1, 1996, THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BEGAN USING THE “METAR” OBSERVATION CODE THAT WAS ALREADY EMPLOYED BY MOST OTHER NATIONS OF THE WORLD. THE MOST NOTICEABLE DIFFERENCE IN THIS ANNUAL PUBLICATION WILL BE THE CHANGE IN UNITS FROM TENTHS TO EIGHTS (OKTAS) FOR REPORTING THE AMOUNT OF SKY COVER.

HEATING DEGREE DAYS (base 65 F) 2001 ASHEVILLE, NC (AVL)
YEAR
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
TOTAL
1972-73
3
0
8
304
578
605
846
737
374
362
158
0
3975
1973-74
0
0
7
205
473
772
516
680
423
299
83
24
3482
1974-75
0
0
65
316
519
760
715
624
619
331
46
7
4002
1975-76
0
0
77
232
498
812
966
566
439
296
168
33
4087
1976-77
2
3
83
411
706
884
1239
768
437
198
66
25
4822
1977-78
0
0
14
331
466
868
1101
878
586
241
139
0
4624
1978-79
0
0
12
283
390
741
951
810
457
268
71
18
4001
1979-80
5
0
44
299
468
707
753
861
573
258
65
2
4035
1980-81
0
0
37
315
533
778
978
696
615
152
152
0
4256
1981-82
0
1
57
326
499
897
1006
659
458
333
38
0
4274
1982-83
0
0
74
274
531
616
872
725
562
410
127
13
4204
1983-84
0
0
84
229
527
882
955
706
618
391
176
9
4577
1984-85
1
0
107
91
648
576
1064
737
520
249
109
19
4121
1985-86
0
6
111
156
266
932
923
633
581
273
91
2
3974
1986-87
0
32
16
268
419
774
913
725
567
369
40
1
4124
1987-88
0
0
47
452
532
702
1013
802
545
308
132
31
4564
1988-89
5
0
33
453
544
808
702
698
454
331
200
4
4232
1989-90
1
8
74
279
558
1028
679
535
446
321
91
3
4023
1990-91
0
0
55
229
445
601
793
627
472
204
53
16
3495
1991-92
0
1
64
242
578
663
748
596
573
274
169
25
3933
1992-93
0
0
34
324
558
794
708
751
677
365
82
9
4302
1993-94
0
0
44
310
563
866
1005
676
544
206
165
0
4379
1994-95
0
1
52
276
441
656
803
736
474
264
87
17
3807
1995-96
0
0
50
255
645
856
912
735
725
341
78
20
4617
1996-97
0
0
76
284
673
753
876
601
412
400
212
64
4351
1997-98
0
5
35
292
675
863
727
631
647
322
71
23
4291
1998-99
0
0
11
214
465
649
718
627
680
210
100
7
3681
1999-00
6
0
56
274
405
705
893
621
460
353
41
11
3825
2000-01
1
1
88
238
607
998
872
566
628
222
63
1
4285
2001-
0
0
97
340
391
620

COOLING DEGREE DAYS (base 65 F) 2001 ASHEVILLE, NC (AVL)
YEAR
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANNUAL
1972
0
0
0
24
6
84
236
237
134
0
1
0
722
1973
0
0
0
1
16
190
288
292
163
19
0
0
969
1974
0
0
0
3
65
82
254
234
92
1
0
0
731
1975
0
0
0
11
82
124
237
252
89
0
0
0
795
1976
0
0
0
0
5
135
198
170
35
2
0
0
545
1977
0
0
0
2
59
173
340
279
146
7
1
0
1007
1978
0
0
0
2
53
188
266
292
168
4
0
0
973
1979
0
0
0
1
55
141
234
261
96
4
0
0
792
1980
0
0
0
8
64
210
396
311
198
4
0
0
1191
1981
0
0
0
10
25
286
316
213
98
7
0
0
955
1982
0
0
0
0
117
206
305
215
64
16
0
0
923
1983
0
0
0
0
25
139
335
362
141
5
0
0
1007
1984
0
0
0
0
25
165
180
211
49
27
0
0
657
1985
0
0
5
2
43
170
229
194
90
25
4
0
762
1986
0
0
0
8
43
209
353
222
112
38
0
0
985
1987
0
0
0
7
97
192
310
309
97
0
0
0
1012
1988
0
0
0
0
18
168
282
304
79
3
0
0
854
1989
0
0
5
23
34
159
264
229
107
11
0
0
832
1990
0
0
0
3
48
187
279
283
141
11
0
0
952
1991
0
0
3
13
132
181
324
227
139
3
0
0
1022
1992
0
0
0
7
20
125
313
174
125
0
0
0
764
1993
0
0
0
0
37
210
411
285
133
5
0
0
1081
1994
0
0
0
15
21
233
259
205
43
2
0
0
778
1995
0
0
1
12
65
127
315
325
68
8
0
0
921
1996
0
0
0
6
120
164
224
209
64
5
0
0
792
1997
0
0
0
0
13
116
265
184
76
1
0
0
655
1998
0
0
0
1
124
230
315
269
178
14
0
0
1131
1999
0
0
0
23
9
143
304
291
78
3
0
0
851
2000
0
0
0
0
83
187
251
215
103
4
1
0
844
2001
0
0
0
24
42
172
249
282
87
1
0
0
857

steeldriving time

the steeldrivers. clockwise from top: richard dailey, gary nichols, mike fleming, mike henderson, tammy rogers. photo by mickey dobo.

the steeldrivers. clockwise from top: richard dailey, gary nichols, mike fleming, mike henderson, tammy rogers. photo by mickey dobo.

If you don’t buy into the familiar notion that timing is indeed everything, then pull up a chair and soak in the saga of The Steeldrivers.

Last year, the blues and soul inflected bluegrass ensemble turned every music-loving head in Nashville when it was nominated for a Grammy for Best Country Performance by a Duo of Group with Vocals – a category that had the acclaimed string band competing with Rascal Flatts, Sugarland, Brooks & Dunn and Lady Antebellum (Sugarland won).

Then came word the band was going to contribute two tunes to the then-upcoming Robert Duvall/Bill Murray film Get Low and even appear in the movie itself.

Needless to say, that provided some pretty swift career momentum as The Steeldrivers got cracking on their second studio album. Then the bomb dropped. No sooner was work wrapped up on the recording than guitarist Chris Stapleton, keeper of the throaty blues wail that made The Steeldrivers’ music so distinctive, bolted from the band.

“Unfortunately, it wasn’t the greatest timing,” confessed Steeldrivers fiddler Tammy Rogers. “Actually, it couldn’t have been worse timing.”

That meant the band members had to decide whether or not to face 2010 with a new album boasting an arresting, roots-savvy voice that was no longer among its ranks.

The call? To start with, The Steeldrivers went even deeper into the well of Southern soul by recruiting Muscle Shoals, Ala. singer/guitarist Gary Nichols before hitting the road for a string of summer festivals and fall headlining shows.

In July, the Get Low soundtrack surfaced. That presented little by way of an identity crisis, as the two traditional fiddle tunes The Steeldrivers contributed (Whiskey Before Breakfast and Angelina Baker) were both instrumental works. In September, though, the second album, now titled Reckless, was released complete with the departed Stapleton on vocals.

And just week, The Steeldrivers found out it will be heading back to the Grammy this winter in the same category as last year for the Reckless song Where Rainbows Never Die.

“We knew it was going to be an odd year in that sense,” said Rogers, who will join Nichols and the rest of The Steeldrivers – mandolinist/guitarist Mike Henderson, banjoist Richard Bailey and bassist Mike Fleming – for the final 2010 taping of the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour on Monday at the Kentucky Theatre.

“We knew we had a new CD coming out as well as a new singer in the band that wasn’t on the album. And we knew it was going to be hard to explain.”

To underscore exactly how difficult it was, Rogers recited one of the more repeated rounds of questions and answers that came about when fans lined up after shows this fall to buy albums.

“Which album is Gary on?”

“Well, none of them.”

“But this new record just came out…”

“Yes, well …”

“Still, putting the album out was the right thing to do musically. Hopefully by this time next year, the dust will have settled, we’ll have another CD out with Gary on it and everything will be clear and delineated. That’s just the kind of way this year has been.

“To be honest, though, I think we found in Gary the only guy in the world who could pull these songs off in our shows. He comes from Muscle Shoals, so he’s steeped in roots music and R&B and all that stuff Chris grew up listening to. But where Chris was more of a soul shouter, Gary has more of a lyrical singing thing going on. They’re both amazing, but it’s a bit like apples and oranges.”

Rolling with the changes is nothing new for Rogers. She has recorded and/or toured with Patty Loveless, Buddy and Julie Miller, Trisha Yearwood, Rodney Crowell and Iris Dement. In fact, even as The Steeldrivers’ career began to catch fire, Rogers was doing double duty by touring as a mainstay member of country megastar Reba McEntire’s band.

“The day after we were at the Grammys, I hopped on Reba’s private jet and flew to Texas to play the San Antonio Rodeo with her the next night. It didn’t seem like such an odd thing to me.

“I worked for Reba for five years. And she has been so supportive every time I’ve seen her since I left. But when you’re playing for an artist, you will always be playing their music. Right now, there is a new energy to The Steeldrivers that Gary has helped bring that feels great. There’s some good stuff ahead for us. I know it.”

The Steeldrivers perform with Molly Andrews at 7 tonight at the Kentucky Theatre, 214 E. Main St. for the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour. Tickets are $10. Call (859) 252-8888.

in performance: alex de grassi

a scene from "a story of floating weeds."

a scene from "a story of floating weeds"

In many ways, the program guitarist Alex de Grassi designed last night at the Downtown Arts Center was the ultimate act of artistic humility. For nearly 90 minutes, he performed in almost complete darkness. The star of the show, in essence, was Yasujiro Ozu’s gorgeous 1934 silent film A Story of Floating Weeds. What de Grassi did was play a live soundtrack built around themes for the movie’s five central characters augmented by a fair level of improvisation. It wasn’t until a question-and-answer session after the screening that the audience even got a clear look at the guitarist.

alex de grassi

alex de grassi

In terms of sheer synchronization, the performance was a feat and a half. When the story’s father balanced a sense of familial abandonment with perceived disrespect on the part of his son, the music tensed up to address the resulting physicality that ignited. In a lighter segment, when the man-manned pantomime horse of a kabuki theatre troupe summoned its makeshift hind leg for a scratch, de Grassi obliged with a scrape on his guitar’s steel strings.

But these instances were largely technical devices. The themes de Grassi composed for the score were nowhere near as obvious. The opening theme in fact, boasted a light, folkish attitude with only passing reference to Asian music. As such, the music’s lyrical vitality provided a bold contrast to Ozu’s heavily nocturnal black-and-white imagery. Even a daylight scene where the film’s lovers, Kihachi and Otaka, see only doom ahead for a romance that had managed to survive a foundation of deceit, seemed almost operatic until the more bittersweet, blues-directed nature of de Grassi’s playing entered.

At times, the film’s rock solid simplicity – Floating Weeds abounds in conflicts of class, family and love that defy cultural boundaries – was so engrossing that it was easy to disconnect from de Grassi’s more subtle guitarwork. That’s a reflection of fine cinema, one supposes. But then again, when a train rolled into the distance and the score’s opening theme was repeated with rich dramatic effect as a coda, there was no denying the colorful impression de Grassi left upon a cinematic treasure from another time and place.

bluegrass brothers

dailey & vincent: jamie dailey (left) and darrin vincent.

dailey & vincent: jamie dailey (left) and darrin vincent.

Sure, they front one of the most commanding bluegrass bands of the day. But it’s best not to buy into every claim that falls from the mouths of Jamie Dailey and Darrin Vincent.

Take, for example, how the two artists met. Both were backstage at the 2001 International Bluegrass Music Association’s annual awards show in Louisville.

“I walked up and introduced myself,” remembered guitarist/vocalist Dailey. “He wouldn’t even speak back to me. I thought, ‘What a snob.'”

A single beat of silence follows. Then a wave of laughter ensued that was made doubly uproarious by the fact that bassist/vocalist Vincent was also on the telephone line and in on the joke.

It’s just another day on the road for what has become the biggest bluegrass success story in ages. In just under three years, the duo has cut four albums, snagged almost every major IBMA award available and gained more than a little attention from the country music market.

“We had no idea things would take off as they did,” Vincent said. “We just had a good feeling about our vocal blend, so we put our best foot forward by doing our very best shows.”

Maybe one of the reasons Dailey & Vincent have been accepted so readily by bluegrass audiences is because many fans were already versed in their individual talents.

Dailey spent a decade as a bassist-turned-guitarist and vocalist for the staunchly traditional bluegrass ensemble Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver. Vincent was playing to audiences when he was six as part of his family’s band, The Sally Mountain Show. Then came Grammy nominated production work for albums by sister Rhonda Vincent that overlapped his extended tenure with Ricky Skaggs’ Kentucky Thunder band.

Today, the duo credits these associations for helping set the stage – not just musically, but also in terms of bandleading, managing, and producing – for what became Dailey & Vincent.

“Discipline, discipline, discipline,” Dailey said when recounting what he picked up from his time with Lawson. “He really taught everyone in his band to be disciplined in their singing, in their playing and in their stage performance.”

“I guess it was all a good training ground,” Vincent said of his pre-duo days. “You can never be prepared for everything. But experience has been key for us. Our manager (Don Light) has always said, ‘There is no substitute for experience and only one way to get it.'”

That way, of course, is simple hard work. The self-titled Dailey & Vincent debut album was released in January 2008. Brothers from Different Mothers followed in March 2009 with a gospel session, Singing from the Heart, hitting stores a mere seven months later. Incessant touring also helped fan the musical flames not only in expected bluegrass strongholds like Virginia, the Carolinas and, yes, Kentucky, but also in more unlikely ports as New York.

In a review for The New York Times, Jon Caramanica labeled a 2009 Dailey & Vincent show at Joe’s Pub as “a sharp performance that they treated with dignity and, ultimately, joy.”

“We have a good chemistry,” Vincent admitted. “We have a lot of the same beliefs and the same likes. Heck, we eat the same foods. It’s really like what that record title says – Brothers from Different Mothers. We have a really close bond with the same outlook and goals in life. And I don’t think something like that just happens by chance.”

The fourth and newest album, released in February 2010 was a project that fell outside the projected trajectory of most commercially minded bands. The title says it all: Dailey & Vincent Sing the Statler Brothers. In short, it was a tribute to the popular 70s and 80s country-gospel group known for its profound vocal harmony sound.

“Our management wasn’t thrilled at the time with us doing that kind of record because our career was so young,” Dailey said. “They thought it might send mixed signals.”

It didn’t. The album debuted at No. 1 on Billboard magazine’s Bluegrass Albums chart and, perhaps more surprisingly, No. 19 on the Top Country Albums chart. Earlier this week, one of the album’s finer tracks, Elizabeth was nominated for a 2011 Grammy Award for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

The duo’s next recording will enlist veteran Nashville producer Garth Fundis. Does that mean an even deeper country direction is in the offing?

“I wouldn’t expect that it would,” answered Dailey. “I think we’re just going to do Dailey & Vincent music.”

Dailey & Vincent perform at 7 tonight at Renfro Valley Entertainment Center in Renfro Valley.  Remainig tickets are $18.96. Call (800) 765-7464.

GoGrocery.com Launched January 6. in our site printable coupons for groceries

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GoGrocery.com is dedicated to offering the most up-to-date, free, printable coupons for groceries. Categories include food, beverage, household, entertainment, personal care, health care, pet care, toys / games and photography.

“Because of current economic times, we’ve seen a huge surge in the demand for coupons for everyday items. GoGrocery.com is a one-stop shop for all your grocery coupon needs,” said Scott Kluth, Founder of GoGrocery.com. web site printable coupons for groceries

The site’s interface is easy to use – shoppers just select the coupons they want to print or use the checkboxes at the top to select all coupons in a certain category and print the ones they want. As coupons are selected, the estimated total savings updates so shoppers can see exactly how much money they’re saving with GoGrocery.com.

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