Archive for April, 2010

hot club or heavy jazz?

the hot club of cowtown: whit smith, elana james and jake erwin.

the hot club of cowtown: whit smith, elana james and jake erwin.

Decisions, decisions. Does one kick back with an Austin, Tx. trio versed in gypsy jazz and Western (and sometime non-Western) swing or dig in with one of Europe’s foremost ambassadors of the jazz avant-garde?

That’s the decision before you tonight as The Hot Club of Cowtown takes over Natasha’s Bistro while veteran saxophonist Peter Brotzmann returns, this time in a duo setting with drummer Hamid Drake, to Gumbo Ya-Ya in the Bar Lexington complex.

The Hot Club of Cowtown has been a Lexington favorite ever since it began gigging regularly at Lynagh’s Music Club in the fall of 1998 following the release of its debut album. Fiddler/vocalist Elana James, guitarist/vocalist Whit Smith and, on more recent recordings (including the fine new Wishful Thinking), bassist/vocalist Jake Erwin have found a balance between the worlds of Bob Wills and Stephane Grappelli and made it very much their own.

The sense of swing that results from their light and joyous string music is a continual delight. Though they have played many special shows in Lexington – including an Applebee’s Park set where they were joined by Willie Nelson and, in 2008, a closing night concert at The Dame’s now demolished West Main location – hearing them within the comfortable confines of Natasha’s should be a major thrill.

hamid drake and peter brotzmann.

hamid drake and peter brotzmann.

Ah, but down the road at Gumbo Ya Ya, revolution is brewing. The Outside the Spotlight Series has scored another superlative 11th hour booking with the return of Brotzmann, the great German saxophonist, clarinetist, improviser, bandleader and vanguard artist of the European avant garde.

Brotzmann’s famed Chicago Tentet essentially started OTS nearly eight years ago. Though he tours internationally, Brotzmann has remained a regular visitor to the series ever since, having played here as recently as February in a duo with cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm. Tonight, he dukes it out with drummer Hamid Drake, another OTS vet.

The Chicago drummer is a ferocious but adaptable percussive force. Among his many fine Lexington concerts are two 2003 outings, both with the extraordinary New York bassist William Parker. The first was with trumpeter Roy Campbell’s Pyramid Trio as half of Lexington remained without power from a February ice storm. The second substituted Brotzmann for Campbell in a makeshift version of the famed Die Like a Dog trio.

Brotzmann and Drake recorded an album of duets back in 1994 titled The Dried Rat Dog. Fine as it is, don’t expect that to be much of a template for tonight’s performance. The two will be making music very much of the moment.

Two shows. Two brands of jazz. Two locales within blocks of each other. What a night to be a jazz nut in Lexington.

+ The Hot Club of Cowtown performs at 9 tonight at Natasha’s Bistro, 112 Esplanade. Tickets are $15. Call (859) 259-2754.

+ Peter Brotzmann and Hamid Drake perform 8 tonight at Gumbo Ya Ya in Bar Lexington, 367 E. Main. Admission is $5. This will be an all-ages performance. (859) 523-9292.

playing for peanuts

pianist george winston. photo by andy argyrakis.

pianist george winston. photo by andy argyrakis.

Somewhere in the early ‘60s, long before he began playing piano on any kind of professional level, George Winston heard a majestic little jazz tune called Cast Your Fate into the Wind. The song was a Grammy winning hit and an early signature tune for the pianist Vince Guaraldi. The melody, as well as the composer’s name, were filed away in a growing catalog of artists that would later shape Winston’s own piano music.

Flash forward to late 1965, the year the world saw the Peanuts comic strip hit TV by way of a soon-to-be classic holiday special called A Charlie Brown Christmas. Winston was an animation buff at the time and thrilled at the idea of seeing Charlie Brown come to life. But when the special finally aired, Winston became enchanted more by the music – especially a rolling, joyous barrelhouse of a tune that played under the rehearsal of a Christmas play by the Peanuts gang.

“When Linus and Lucy came on, I went crazy, just like everyone else,” recalled Winston. “I missed the credits at the end of the program but kept thinking, ‘God, that music was great and that one song with the band… incredible.

“That was on a Thursday. The next day I was at the record store and there it was, up the wall – A Charlie Brown Christmas. I thought, ‘I’ve got to have that song. I looked at the record sleeve and saw the music was by Vince Guaraldi. I thought, ‘Wow. The Cast Your Fate guy.’ I bought it and must have played Linus and Lucy 100 times.”

Forward again another three decades. Winston is firmly established as one of the premier contemporary pianists of his generation. His reputation was established on a series of seasonally themed solo piano albums for the Windham Hill label, although Winston is also a versed guitarist, harmonica player and the guiding force of another label, Dancing Cat Records, which promotes Hawaiian slack key guitar music.

But by 1996, Winston returned to the Guaraldi muse via a tribute album titled Linus and Lucy: The Music of Vince Guaraldi. The recording offered Winston’s interpretations of Guaraldi’s best known works from Cast Your Fate into the Wind to Linus and Lucy to music from throughout Guaraldi’s storied career.

But even as Linus and Lucy hit record stores, Winston knew he wasn’t through with Guaraldi. A second volume was going to be necessary to properly convey his thoughts, feelings and insights about Guaraldi’s music. Hence, the new Love Will Come: The Music of Vince Guaraldi, Volume 2, the recording that brings Winston back to Lexington on Monday, where he will be the lone guest of the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour, and Thursday, for a free performance at Berea College. 

“I always planned for two volumes,” Winston said. “There were songs I was working on for the first volume where I just felt, ‘No. This will work better on Volume 2.’ It just took awhile to figure out which tunes would go together best.”

Love Will Come digs deeper into the songs Guaraldi created in and out of the Peanuts camp. Among them are Jambo’s (Casaba) and Brasilia, two beautiful Brazilian works cut by Guaraldi in 1963 and 1964, respectively. The album also delves deep enough into Guaraldi’s soundtrack music to remind us that he scored 16 different Peanuts specials.

Most we know by heart, like Charlie Brown’s All Stars and It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (both from 1966). But It’s Arbor Day, Charlie Brown? Who remembers that? Winston does.

On Love Will Come he includes a variation on Rain, Rain Go Away that Guaraldi featured in both Charlie Brown’s All Stars and It’s Arbor Day, Charlie Brown. The later program, the last Peanuts special, aired in 1976, the year Guaraldi died.

“Some of his music was only recorded for the specials,” Winston said. “It’s only there under the narration and the action. I’ve been listening to those tunes and looking through them for decades. I’ve played them all – every cue, every song, every record Vince did. I watched all of the Peanuts specials with a tape recorder up to the TV. I’ve got all the videos that came out years later. Not everything he did works for me as a player. On certain things, I go, ‘It’s a great tune. But it’s more for me to listen to than to play.’ But I just love his songs.”

Winston actually shared a few concert bills with Guaraldi at a Palo Alto club in the ‘70s. Winston served as the “intermission pianist,” playing between Guaraldi’s sets. Winston remembers Guaraldi as being encouraging and supportive.

“Artists’ inspirations are, I think, part of everyone’s endeavors in life. People have their mentors, their influences, their inspirations. They all come together inside the person that’s taking it all in and come out being part of who that person is.

“You have your identity and then you have the things you received from your mentors. It’s a different combination for everybody. We’ve all got our own unique way of how we end up showing what they gave to us.”

George Winston performs at 7 tonight at the Kentucky Theatre, 214 East Main, for the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour. $20. Call (859) 252-8888. He will also present a free convocation concert at 8 p.m. Thursday at Berea College’s Phelps Stokes Chapel. Call (859) 985-3359.

Show’s surprise package Show’s surprise package.

New Zealand Herald (Auckland, New Zealand) October 7, 2010 Lotus surprised the Paris motor show by unveiling not just one new model but six, including a replacement for the celebrated Esprit, a new Elise and a four-door coupe to rival the Porsche Panamera and Aston Martin Rapide.

The multi-model presentation wasn’t the only surprise _ the presence in the inner circle of Downunder Ferrari distributor Neville Crichton and his Ferrari general manager Kevin Wall led to speculation that Crichton’s Ateco Automotive company might be the new Lotus agent for New Zealand and Australia.

Apart from Ferrari, Ateco also handles Fiat, Alfa Romeo and Citroen in both countries. Ateco public relations manager Edward Rowe said, in response to queries about Crichton and Wall: “Ateco is always interested in new business opportunities, but until we have finalised an agreement we never talk about with whom we may or may not be discussing possible opportunities.” Lotus will continue to be represented Downunder by Sydney-based Lotus Cars and Proton Cars (Malaysia’s Proton own Lotus) until its agreement is rolled over in 2012, or a new distributor appointed.

Lotus’ global sales network was told in July that contracts would end in July 2012, part of a plan to overhaul the entire company within the next five years. It is expected to announce its dealer network later this year. Lotus wants to move upmarket, targeting brands such as Aston Martin, Porsche, Lamborghini and Ferrari. this web site aston martin rapide

Said Lotus boss Dany Bahar, who has been head of the company since October 2009 and has assembled a crack team of experts from Ferrari, AMG and Jaguar: “Lotus has been neglected as a brand. Twenty years ago we were mentioned in the same breath as Ferrari and Lamborghini. But there has been no investment lately.

“So over the next 10 years we will invest 770 million (NZ$1.6 billion).

“Our new range will be world class, innovative, pioneering and green. They will be efficient with respect to the environment. And in terms of social acceptance.

“We have to adapt Lotus DNA to today’s requirements. I have not seen it written down anywhere at Lotus that the engine has to be in the middle. Or that it cannot be in the front or in the rear.

“We will continue to follow performance through lightweight, but that doesn’t mean that our cars must weigh less than 1000kg. It means they are the lightest in their class.

“That is what performance through lightweight means to us.” The Lotus range will be split into two new mid-engined sports cars, the Elan and the Esprit, and two new range-topping front-engined GT cars, the two-door 2+2 Elite and the larger four-door Eterne.

Lower down the range will be the new Elise and a super low-emission small car, with electric power and a range extending petrol engine, which is dubbed the New Compact Car.

All the models show off the firm’s new face, inspired by the original Lotus Seven.

The front end features an oversized central air intake, flanked by slim LED headlights and twin lower air intakes.

“The existing two-dimensional grille [on the Evora and Elise] is not expressive enough. We need more sculpture and dignity, so we looked at the Seven _ the way the grille worked with the headlights on the wings _ said chief designer Donato Coco.

The new cars will be built at a revamped plant in England. The first models, likely to be the Esprit and Elan, will go on sale in 2012. Lotus expects to sell 8000 cars when at full capacity and break even on its investment in 2014.

The all-new Esprit flagship wasn’t unexpected.

Before the show Lotus hinted that Esprit would return to Paris precisely 35 years after the original Giugiaro-designed concept was unveiled in 1975. see here aston martin rapide

The mid-engine Esprit is expected in 2013, powered by a Lotus-supercharged and Lexus-sourced 5-litre V8 revving to 8500rpm and producing 456kW of power and 720Nm of torque.

Tipping the scales at 1450kg and driving the rear wheels through a seven-speed double-clutch gearbox, the new Esprit will blast from zero to 100km/h in 3.4 seconds on its way to a 330km/h top speed.

Fitted with the optional Lotus-developed Formula 1-style KERS energy regeneration system, the Esprit is also claimed to emit 250gr/km of CO2, relatively low for the supercar class.

Said Bahar: “In the past when Lotus surprised the Paris motor show by unveiling not just one new model but six, including a replacement for the celebrated Esprit, a new Elise and a four-door coupe to rival the Porsche Panamera and Aston Martin Rapide.

The multi-model presentation wasn’t the only surprise _ the presence in the inner circle of Downunder Ferrari distributor Neville Crichton and his Ferrari general manager Kevin Wall led to speculation that Crichton’s Ateco Automotive company might be the new Lotus agent for New Zealand and Australia.

Apart from Ferrari, Ateco also handles Fiat, Alfa Romeo and Citroen in both countries. Ateco public relations manager Edward Rowe said, in response to queries about Crichton and Wall: “Ateco is always interested in new business opportunities, but until we have finalised an agreement we never talk about with whom we may or may not be discussing possible opportunities.” Lotus will continue to be represented Downunder by Sydney-based Lotus Cars and Proton Cars (Malaysia’s Proton own Lotus) until its agreement is rolled over in 2012, or a new distributor appointed.

Lotus’ global sales network was told in July that contracts would end in July 2012, part of a plan to overhaul the entire company within the next five years. It is expected to announce its dealer network later this year. Lotus wants to move upmarket, targeting brands such as Aston Martin, Porsche, Lamborghini and Ferrari.

Said Lotus boss Dany Bahar, who has been head of the company since October 2009 and has assembled a crack team of experts from Ferrari, AMG and Jaguar: “Lotus has been neglected as a brand. Twenty years ago we were mentioned in the same breath as Ferrari and Lamborghini. But there has been no investment lately.

“So over the next 10 years we will invest 770 million (NZ$1.6 billion).

“Our new range will be world class, innovative, pioneering and green. They will be efficient with respect to the environment. And in terms of social acceptance.

“We have to adapt Lotus DNA to today’s requirements. I have not seen it written down anywhere at Lotus that the engine has to be in the middle. Or that it cannot be in the front or in the rear.

“We will continue to follow performance through lightweight, but that doesn’t mean that our cars must weigh less than 1000kg. It means they are the lightest in their class.

“That is what performance through lightweight means to us.” The Lotus range will be split into two new mid-engined sports cars, the Elan and the Esprit, and two new range-topping front-engined GT cars, the two-door 2+2 Elite and the larger four-door Eterne.

Lower down the range will be the new Elise and a super low-emission small car, with electric power and a range extending petrol engine, which is dubbed the New Compact Car.

All the models show off the firm’s new face, inspired by the original Lotus Seven.

The front end features an oversized central air intake, flanked by slim LED headlights and twin lower air intakes.

“The existing two-dimensional grille [on the Evora and Elise] is not expressive enough. We need more sculpture and dignity, so we looked at the Seven _ the way the grille worked with the headlights on the wings _ said chief designer Donato Coco.

The new cars will be built at a revamped plant in England. The first models, likely to be the Esprit and Elan, will go on sale in 2012. Lotus expects to sell 8000 cars when at full capacity and break even on its investment in 2014.

The all-new Esprit flagship wasn’t unexpected.

Before the show Lotus hinted that Esprit would return to Paris precisely 35 years after the original Giugiaro-designed concept was unveiled in 1975.

The mid-engine Esprit is expected in 2013, powered by a Lotus-supercharged and Lexus-sourced 5-litre V8 revving to 8500rpm and producing 456kW of power and 720Nm of torque.

Tipping the scales at 1450kg and driving the rear wheels through a seven-speed double-clutch gearbox, the new Esprit will blast from zero to 100km/h in 3.4 seconds on its way to a 330km/h top speed.

Fitted with the optional Lotus-developed Formula 1-style KERS energy regeneration system, the Esprit is also claimed to emit 250gr/km of CO2, relatively low for the supercar class.

Said Bahar: “In the past when

in performance: the apples in stereo

Never underestimate the power of sunny pop hooks and a team of tambourines. The Apples in stereo sure didn’t last night when it kicked off a spring tour on semi-home ground at Cosmic Charlie’s.

Admittedly, there were all kinds of keen pop devices at work during the program – banks of analog synthesizers, grooves that leapt from psychedelia to disco and the falsetto vocals that Lexington-based leader Robert Schneider employed to color the whole evening. But peel the skin from the show – from the numerous previews the Apples provided to its new Travellers in Space and Time album (due out Tuesday) to generous back catalog entries – and what you were left with were songs that were essentially mini hullabaloos.

Take Told You Once, the second Travellers tune of the evening (the new album’s synth-savvy Dignified Dignitary opened the performance). It was all retro dance-pop fun with John Ferguson’s vocoder-ized harmonies backing up Schneider’s giddy singing. But while the mood all but pitched a tent in the ‘70s, the tune itself reeled back into the ‘60s when those massive pop melodies, augmented by swinging tambourines on both sides of the stage, took over. Energy, the radio hit from 2007’s New Magnetic Wonder album, followed and took the tambourine count to three. The party was now officially in motion.

Schneider insisted the new Apples sound was futuristic. And perhaps in terms of strictly non-musical design, it was. The band’s seven members (the official six-man lineup along with Big Fresh keyboardist/guitarist/trumpeter Ben Phelan helping out) were decked out last night in designer space duds for the occasion. But the music and repertoire were retro city.

Back-to-back performances of Strawberryfire (a mix of Led Zeppelin percussive might, Hendrix-style guitar fuzz and, aptly, Strawberry Fields-era Beatlemania) and the mantra-like affirmation Sun is Out (also from New Magnetic Wonder) provided a blast of sonic psychedelia. Newer Travellers tunes like Hey Elevator and No One in This World (the later using a curious mix of trumpet and melodica for orchestration) edged the Apples up to the disco era.

The set list bounced through the years, as well. The Kinks-like What’s the #? and the more guitar dominate Tin Pan Alley offered a nice two-song memoir of 1997’s Tone Cool Evolution album while the brassy anthem Go was offered from 2000’s The Discovery of a World Inside the Moone.

Are these the sounds of the future? Maybe not. But Schneider and the Apples more than made a case for employing such familiar pop confections as rocket fuel for a present day party in the cosmos.

BOARD OF REGENTS ACTIONS IN 47 PROFESSIONAL DISCIPLINE CASES

US Fed News Service, Including US State News December 5, 2006 The New York State Department of Education issued the following press release:

The Board of Regents announced disciplinary actions resulting in the revocation of 1 license, surrender of 12 licenses, and 34 other disciplinary actions. The penalty indicated for each case relates solely to the misconduct set forth in that particular case.

I. REVOCATION AND SURRENDERS Architecture Christopher Beardsley; 846 North Taney Street, Philadelphia, PA 19130; Lic. No. 027006; Cal. No. 23020; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee did not contest the charge of filing a false report.

Chiropractic Salvatore A. Feudi; Bare Hill Correctional Facility, 181 Brand Road, Malone, NY 12953-0020; Lic. No. 006391; Cal. No. 23011; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee admitted to charges of having been convicted of three counts of Sodomy in the 2nd Degree.

Dentistry Ahmed Aziz; 6160 Lucas Pond Court, Burke, VA 22015; Lic. No. 036909; Cal. No. 23021; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licenseedid not contest the charge of having been convicted of 2nd Degree Sexual Offense in the State of Maryland.

Nursing Jason Anthony Rotunno; Licensed Practical Nurse, Registered Professional Nurse; 55 Pearl Road, Rocky Point, NY 11778; Lic. Nos. 234685, 470121; Cal. Nos. 21865, 21866; Application to surrender licenses granted. Summary: Licensee did not contest charges that, while practicing the profession of nursing in the Intensive Care Unit at Stony Brook University Hospital and Medical Center, and caring for a post-partum patient, he failed to take and/or document the patient’s vital signs and intake and output as often as was ordered; he failed to pick up some physician orders; he failed to write an admission note; and he administered 1000 cc’s of fluid to the patient when in fact the physician’s order called for only 500 cc’s to be administered.

Michael A. Edwards; Licensed Practical Nurse; Groveland Correctional Facility, 7000 Sonyea Road, Sonyea, NY 14556; Lic. No. 231951; Cal. No. 22501; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: Revocation.

James H. VanDamme; Registered Professional Nurse; 241 Mason Street, Canandaigua, NY 14424; Lic. No. 245075; Cal. No. 22724; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee did not contest the charge of willfully failing to comply with substantial provisions of state laws, rules or regulations governing the nursing profession.

Kathleen A. Leone; Licensed Practical Nurse; 945 Tuthill Road Extension, Southold, NY 11971; Lic. No. 225138; Cal. No. 22959; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee admitted to the charge of diverting controlled substances for her own use.

David C. Glover; Licensed Practical Nurse; 493 Lisbon Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14215; Lic. No. 241813; Cal. No. 23001; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee admitted to charges of having been convicted of two counts of child pornography.

Elizabeth Anne Cole; Registered Professional Nurse; P.O. Box 335, Tyrone, NY 14487; Lic. No. 185498; Cal. No. 23046; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee could not successfully defend against the charge of diverting the drug Ultram for her own use. in our site new york state department of education

Sandra G. Corder; Registered Professional Nurse; 2724 Duluth Avenue, Highland, IN 46322; Lic. No. 313730; Cal. No. 23054; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee did not contest the charge of having been found guilty of professional misconduct in Indiana.

Pharmacy Steven Mensah-Narh; 24 Wedgewood Drive, North Brunswick, NJ 08902-1347; Lic. No. 050940; Cal. No. 23065; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee did not contest the charge of having been found guilty of improper professional practice or professional misconduct in New Jersey.

Andrea Lynn Holstein; 4766 Vista Ridge Drive, Dublin, OH 43017; Lic. No. 046457; Cal. No. 23066; Application to surrender license granted. Summary: Licensee did not contest the charge of having been found guilty of improper professional practice or professional misconduct in Ohio.

II. OTHER REGENTS DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS Architecture Brian Burke; 67 Cooper Drive, New Rochelle, NY 10801; Lic. No. 022649; Cal. No. 22441; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: 36 month suspension, execution of last 30 months of suspension stayed, probation for at least 7 years and until termination of criminal probation as set forth in Regents Review Committee report.

Nicole De Acetis; 161A Asharoken Avenue, Asharoken, NY 11768; Lic. No. 016923; Cal. No. 23069; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 2 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $2,500 fine.

Chiropractic Norman E. O’Dell; 853 Ridge Road, Webster, NY 14580; Lic. No. 006229; Cal. No. 22835; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 year stayed suspension, 1 year probation, $1,500 fine.

Dentistry Shahryar Sedgh; 738 Broadway, Brooklyn, NY 11206; Lic. No. 047141; Cal. No. 22789; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 2 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $7,500 fine.

Richard J. Bollon; 366 North Broadway, Jericho, NY 11753; Lic. No. 029679; Cal. No. 22799; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 month actual suspension, 23 month stayed suspension, 24 months probation, $50,000 fine.

Richard J. Bollon DDS PC; 366 North Broadway, Jericho, NY 11753; Cal. No. 22800; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 24 months probation, $10,000 fine.

Arthur Merrill Chasin; P.O. Box 725, Merrick, NY 11566; Lic. No. 020598; Cal. No. 22904; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 2 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $7,500 fine.

Oliver Marvin Harmon; 932 Largo Center Drive, Largo, MD 20774; Lic. No. 026968; Cal. No. 22965; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 2 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation, 100 hours of public service.

Engineering and Land Surveying Neal A. O’Connor; Professional Engineer; 120 Tysen Street, Staten Island, NY 10301; Lic. No. 059548; Cal. No. 22890; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 year stayed suspension, 1 year probation, $2,500 fine.

Massage Therapy Cary C. Smagala; 6 Fox Hollow Lane, Queensbury, NY 12804; Lic. No. 015515; Cal. No. 22905; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 2 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $500 fine.

Nursing Selina N. Uche; Licensed Practical Nurse; 44 Briggs Street, Rochester, NY 14611; Lic. No. 268564; Cal. No. 21623; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: Pursue and complete certain courses within 1 year, probation 1 year.

Shannon K. Harkins; Licensed Practical Nurse; 141 Water Street, Perry, NY 14530; Lic. No. 258604; Cal. No. 21859; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: Partial suspension in certain area for not less than one year and until present satisfactory proof of completion of certain course of retraining in said area, probation 2 years.

Shamsher Chauhan; Licensed Practical Nurse, Registered Professional Nurse; 33 Pheasant Run, Scarsdale, NY 10583; Lic. Nos. 195968, 419670; Cal. Nos. 22512, 22513; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: Indefinite actual suspension for not less than 6 months and until fit to practice – upon termination of suspension 2 years probation, $1,000 fine.

Stacy Lynn Sharot a/k/a Stacy L. Burlison; Licensed Practical Nurse; 12?? Arthur Avenue, Endicott, NY 13760; 266 South Main Street, Nichols, NY 13812; Lic. No. 266117; Cal. No. 22524; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: Censure and Reprimand.

Timothy K. Murtaugh; Licensed Practical Nurse; 262 Ridgefield Drive, Middletown, CT 06457; Lic. No. 267115; Cal. No. 22661; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: 2 year suspension, execution of suspension stayed, probation 2 years, $500 fine.

Lorri Varese a/k/a Lorri A. Varese; Licensed Practical Nurse, Registered Professional Nurse; 9 Oelsner Drive, Northport, NY 11768; Lic. Nos. 248765, 525821; al. Nos. 22780, 22781; Application for cnsent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: Censure and Reprimand, 1 year probation, $500 fine.

Cheryl Kiss a/k/a Cheryl Kluchar; Registered Professional Nurse; 25 Hammersley Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601; Lic. No. 507284; Cal. No. 22794; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 6 month actual suspension, 18 month stayed suspension, 2 years probation to commence upon return to practice.

Laura J. Spiak; Licensed Practical Nurse; 511 Fourth Avenue, Watervliet, NY 12189; Lic. No. 088968; Cal. No. 22834; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 year stayed suspension, 1 year probation, $250 fine.

Kristine Lisa Welles a/k/a McKey; Registered Professional Nurse; 15263 McNamara Road, Holley, NY 14470; Lic. No. 391429; Cal. No. 22865; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: Indefinite actual suspension until fit to practice, upon termination of suspension 2 years probation to commence upon return to practice. go to site new york state department of education

Heather Anne Benedict; Licensed Practical Nurse; 7 West Academy Street, McGraw, NY 13101; Lic. No. 237985; Cal. No. 22927; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 month actual suspension, 23 month stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $500 fine.

Ronald Paul Mastronardi; Registered Professional Nurse; P.O. Box 292, Jefferson Valley, NY 10535; Lic. No. 483943; Cal. No. 22929; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 month actual suspension, 23 month stayed suspension, 24 months probation.

Slava Gotlib a/k/a Vycheslav Gotlib; Registered Professional Nurse; 55 Bay 34th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11214; Lic. No. 507078; Cal. No. 22938; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 month actual suspension, 23 month stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $500 fine.

Christine A. Trischitta; Licensed Practical Nurse; 54 Trout Brook Road, Highland Mills, NY 10930; Lic. No. 167738; Cal. No. 22960; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 2 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $500 fine.

Vicki Lee Buback; Registered Professional Nurse; 300 Phoenix Park Drive, Jacksonville, NC 28546; Lic. No. 499280; Cal. No. 22996; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: Indefinite actual suspension until fit to practice – upon termination of suspension 2 years probation to commence upon return to practice in New York State.

Pharmacy Mary Jo Marino a/k/a Mary Jo Brown; 169 Old Niskayuna Road, Latham, NY 12110; Lic. No. 036576; Cal. No. 19540; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: Censure and Reprimand, $500 fine.

Rite Aid of New York Inc. #686; Retail Pharmacy; 9519 Foster Wheeler Road, North Dansville, NY 14437; Reg. No. 014308; Cal. No. 22405; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 year stayed suspension, 1 year probation, $5,000 fine.

Brad A. Vacchetto; 300 North Avenue, Rochester, NY 14626; Lic. No. 047814; Cal. No. 22886; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 3 year stayed suspension, 3 years probation, $5,000 fine.

Kenneth R. Horwitz; 8 Mohawk Place, Randolph, NJ 07869; Lic. No. 042014; Cal. No. 22966; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 year actual suspension, 1 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation.

Psychology Yevgeniy Margulis a/k/a Yevgeniy D. Margulis a/k/a Eugene Margulis; 2126 Benson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11214; Lic. No. 014157; Cal. No. 22827; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: 24 month suspension, execution of last 18 months of suspension stayed, $1,250 fine to be paid within 90 days.

Public Accountancy Lee Steven Epstein; Certified Public Accountant; 142 Murray Drive, Oceanside, NY 11572; Lic. No. 059732; Cal. No. 22869; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 2 year stayed suspension, 2 years probation, $1,500 fine.

Krinsky & Epstein, CPA, P.C.; 265 East Merrick Road, Valley Stream, NY 11590; Cal. No. 22870; Application for consent order granted; Penalty agreed upon: 1 year probation, $1,500 fine.

Social Work Yevgeniy Margulis a/k/a Yevgeniy D. Margulis a/k/a Eugene Margulis; Licensed Master Social Worker; 2126 Benson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11214; Lic. No. 052298; Cal. No. 22828; Found guilty of professional misconduct; Penalty: 24 month suspension, execution of last 18 months of suspension stayed, $1,250 fine to be paid within 90 days.Contact: Jonathan Burman and Tom Dunn, 518/474-1201.

Jonathan Burman and Tom Dunn, 518/474-1201.

record store day 2010

The unwritten theme here is preservation. It’s not a mere commercial for a local business, but the celebratory battle cry for a beloved, consumer embraced musical tradition that is fading before our ears.

In short, Saturday is Record Store Day – the day we salute the indie institutions that still let us file through racks of vinyl albums and compact discs. It’s a celebration of community-run businesses that used to be, outside of radio, the prime outlet for discovering new music while keeping older sounds and styles alive.

Over 700 stores will be participating in Record Store Day across the country on Saturday. Hundreds more will honor it around the world. Locally, Record Store Day will be celebrated by our pals at CD Central, 377 S. Limestone. In honoring the day, the store has a full afternoon of free live music planned. Here’s the lineup:

+ Contra-punctus (12 p.m.)

+ Rough Customers (1 p.m.)

+ Wooden Wand (2 p.m.)

+ Coralee and the Townies (3 p.m.)

+ Rachael Sage (4 p.m.)

+ Vicious Guns (5 p.m.)

New York songsmith Sage, whose ninth and newest album, Delancey Street, has been favorably compared to the music of Kate Bush, will also be performing at Al’s Bar, 601 North Limestone, later in the evening (9 p.m, $5).

Scores of national artists are again getting in on the fun by releasing limited edition recordings, many of them on vinyl, for Record Store Day. The Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Jimi Hendrix (posthumously, of course), The Doors (ditto), Wilco, The Flaming Lips, Ani DiFranco, Drive-By Truckers, Devo, Them Crooked Vultures, Of Montreal, MGMT, Manchester Orchestra, Mason Jennings, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Grace Potter and the Nocturnals and Cage the Elephant are just some of the names releasing exclusive music for Record Store Day.

For more about Record Store Day, go to www.recordstoreday, www.cdcentralmusic.com or call (859) 233-3472.

EAST CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE BUSINESS, EDUCATION AND HEALTHCARE EXPO SET MARCH 8

US Fed News Service, Including US State News February 28, 2012 DECATUR, Miss., Feb. 27 — East Central Community College issued the following news release:

Career and educational opportunities will be available for East Central Community College students when the College hosts its tenth annual Business, Education and Healthcare Expo scheduled Thursday, March 8, 2012, on the Decatur campus.

The public is also invited to attend the free event, which is scheduled from 9:30 to 11 a.m. in the Brackeen-Wood Physical Education Building.

“We are very pleased with the response we have received from the various vendors and are looking forward to another successful Expo,” said Wayne Eason, Director of Workforce Education and Expo committee chairman. go to site east central community college

Approximately 40 vendors are participating in this year’s event and include the following: Avon, Meridian; Baptist Health Systems, Jackson; Baptist Medical Center (Leake), Carthage; Central Mississippi Residential Center, Newton; Color Me Beautiful, Toomsumba; East Central Mississippi Healthcare, Sebastopol; ESCO Corporation, Newton; Friends of Children of MS, Inc., Newton; GEO Group, Meridian; Golden Living Center, Carthage; H&H Chief Sales, Carthage; Hol-Mac Corp., Bay Springs; Jackson State University, Jackson; Laird Hospital, Union; Liberty National Life Insurance, Meridian; Manpower, Meridian; Mississippi Army National Guard, Newton; Mississippi Care Center of Morton, Morton; Mississippi College, Clinton; Mississippi Organ and Recovery Agency, Flowood; Mississippi State University, Meridian; Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks, Canton; Mississippi Rural Health and Primary Care, Jackson; Mississippi Teacher Center, Jackson; Pioneer Community Hospital of Newton, Newton; River Valley Animal Foods, Forest; Rush Health Systems, Meridian; Scott Regional Hospital, Morton; St. Dominic Hospital, Jackson; United Blood Services, Meridian; University of Mississippi, University; University of Mississippi Health Care, Jackson; University of West Alabama, Livingston; University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg; Raytheon, Inc., Forest; Anderson Hospital, Meridian; and Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation, Meridian. here east central community college

apples in space

the apples in stereo: john hill, bill doss, john ferguson, robert schneider, john dufilho and eric allen. photo by adam cantor.

the apples in stereo: john hill, bill doss, john ferguson, robert schneider, john dufilho and eric allen. photo by adam cantor.

“Retro-futuristic.” It sounds like a contradiction, doesn’t it? After all, how can something look to tomorrow with a design fashioned after yesterday?

Robert Schneider has that one figured out. In bringing his long-running pop enterprise known as The Apples in stereo back to active duty with a tour that kicks off tonight and a new album that hits stores next week, the Lexington-based songsmith, producer and pop entrepreneur has come up with a bright and immensely studio-savvy sound he hopes can be viewed as a voice for the future.

But the future according to Schneider isn’t the pre-programmed, computer animated cosmos we are increasingly being led into. It’s a more innocent and decidedly child-like place inspired by television and film of years, even decades, past. It’s less Star Wars and more Santa Claus Conquers the Martians. While the environment nods to its cultural forefathers, the music, for all its hi-tech accents, is still played by real musicians.

This then, as shown by the new Travellers in Space and Time album, is the brave new/old world of The Apples in stereo.

“I wanted to make the record sound futuristic,” Schneider said. “But my image of futurism is influenced by the kinds of futuristic stuff I grew up liking as a kid. So in the end, my idea of futuristic pop turned out sounding a whole lot like ‘70s pop.

“I also really wanted it to sound hopeful. In doing so, my inspirations for the record’s sound were mostly visual. I wanted the record to sound more like the way old sci-fi movies looked, or how old episodes of Dr. Who and Lost in Space looked. The whole way their technology looked… I wanted the music to sound like that, like stainless steel and flashing lights, but with a hand crafted, human feel.

“It’s like the way old computers were built. You can see they were made by hand. They don’t look like they were stamped out by Sony or something, like modern electronic gear does. I wanted something where you could see the lines of solder between the front and back.”

Back to the future: In understanding the futuristic new music of The Apples in stereo, it’s perhaps best for a quick rewind.

The Apples came to be when Schneider, a South African native, moved from Ruston, La. to Denver to attend college in 1991. A six-song EP disc titled Tidal Wave, credited simply to The Apples, appeared in 1993. It also marked the beginning of the highly influential Elephant 6 pop collective that spawned bands like The Olivia Tremor Control, Neutral Milk Hotel and, eventually, Elf Power and Of Montreal.

Schneider relocated to Lexington with then-wife (and then-Apples drummer) Hilarie Sidney after the release of the fifth album credited to The Apples in stereo, Velocity in Sound. The band then became a more splintered enterprise, with its members scattered all over the country. But its popularity steadily rose. The release of 2007’s New Magnetic Wonder album teamed the Apples with actor Elijah Wood’s Simian Records label. That, in turn, won over such high profile pals as comedian Stephen Colbert.

The reception to New Magnetic Wonder also gave the Apples a broadened sense of artistic confidence.

“I think we went into making Travellers in Space and Time thinking we could pull off anything that we wanted to do musically. With New Magnetic Wonder, I had a really high goal. As a producer and writer of the most of the songs, I wanted it to be the essential Apples record, the perfect expression of everywhere the Apples have gone. And we pulled it off.

“I also felt the last record was the perfect psychedelic indie-pop Apples record. The new one isn’t really psychedelic. It’s not really indie at all. I don’t even think it’s rock. It’s just really poppy. We went into it feeling super confident.”

Traveling for Travellers: There is a certain irony in the name of the new Apples album that extends beyond its “retro futurism” premise. With the band members living and working in different locales, Schneider became something of a traveling musical bandleader.

In Lexington, he worked extensively with vocalist/keyboardist John Ferguson of Big Fresh (who joined the Apples lineup in 2006) and in the studio of longtime local rock pro Otto Helmuth. But veteran Apples members John Hill (guitar) and Eric Allen (bass) are still stationed in Denver, while keyboardist Bill Doss and drummer John Dufilho live in Athens, Ga. and Dallas, respectively. (Big Fresh’s Ben Phelan will serve as an auxiliary band member on the Apples’ spring tour.) Journeys to studios in Western Kentucky and Nashville were also integral to the recording sessions for Travellers.

“As far as the recording was concerned, I think having lots of different places, different environments to go, actually helped the process,” Schneider said. “I liked traveling to different studios to work on different tracks. It kind of broadened the palette of sounds and feeling. And you can hear the different personalities of the people involved. Even when the music becomes especially slick on a couple of the songs, you can hear the good time that was being had.

“It can be grueling to work in your home studio or even your home base studio for months on end. This album took a year and a half to make. The mixing alone took months, but I won’t go into that. There was just a lot to mix and a lot to carve away. But it can be grueling.

“I used to have a studio in Denver, where I worked for 10 years constantly. Even though it was a creative place, there was still this sense of the same environment everyday wearing you down. So I liked the feeling of traveling to my friends’ studios and working with them.”

This weekend, though, the serious traveling begins. With tonight’s performance at Cosmic Charlie’s begins the first swing of touring for Travellers in Space and Time. It’s not an especially burdensome tour – only a three week run along the East Coast and through the Midwest, winding up in St. Louis on May 4. For Schneider, that’s long enough.

“I’m looking forward to it. I’m looking forward to seeing my friends and, of course, I love to play and sing. But there’s some stress surrounding touring, too. I have to leave my son for a few weeks. I hate that.

“There are two different sides to touring. On one hand, it’s almost like you’re on this ship out in the ocean. There’s total freedom, even though you’re on a kind of regimented schedule. And given that this particular tour is only for three weeks, it’s perfect. But when you’re out for two months straight or more, you start to feel you’re without roots. You feel like a stranger when you come home.

“Now that I’m in my 30s, I prefer to not to feel like a stranger.”

The Apples in stereo with The Generationals and Laminated Cat perform at 8 tonight at Cosmic Charlie’s, 388 Woodland Ave. Tickets are $12. Call (859) 309-9499.

in performance: acid mothers temple

acid mothers temple: bassist/saxophonist tsuyama atsushi, drummer shimura koji, keyboardist/guitarist higashi hiroshi and guitarist kawabata makoto

acid mothers temple: bassist/saxophonist tsuyama atsushi, drummer shimura koji, keyboardist/guitarist higashi hiroshi and guitarist kawabata makoto with a friend in the foreground.

A typical passage from like night’s very intriguing performance by the Japanese psychedelic prog-rock troupe Acid Mothers Temple at Cosmic Charlie’s went like this. First, guitar fragments ignited and soared with fairly merciless ferocity. Underneath, drums and bass pounded away with propulsion that was more punkish than prog-ish. Over all of that, synthesizers popped and gurgled around the music like bubbles in the proverbial lava lamp.

It was, as they say, “a trip.”

In its roughly 15 year history, Acid Mothers Temple has become a collective with more offshoots and franchise productions than Law and Order. The quartet version that came to town last night was officially billed as Acid Mothers Temple and the Melting Paraiso UFO. The most established and prolific of the AMT bands (it released four albums on four different labels last year), the unit still boasted AMT guitarist/founder Kawabata Makoto as its driving force. 

The music that manifested last night during a 90 minute set was like a cross between the playful psychedelia of two British bands – Gong (which AMT has often collaborated with) and the cleaner, more orchestrated Ozric Tentacles.

Like the latter band, AMT favored guitar squalls that shifted from drone-like ambience to Hendrix-style intensity. Drummer Shimura Koji, while maintaining high intensity grooves, often equaled the intuitive sparks behind Makoto’s louder excursions. Keyboardist Higashi Hiroshi, looking every bit the Kurosawa-style warlord with his shoulder length silver hair, colored the spacier, more ambient sections of the performance. Bassist Tsuyama Atsushi was the utility man. His multi-tasking duties involved chant-like vocals and a brief Coltrane-esque turn on soprano saxophone. He also manned the merchandise table prior to the show. What a slacker.

Boisterously “trippy” as it all was, one has to admit that the 15 minute blasts of Makoto’s reverb-drenched guitar fury – and there were several of them last night – sometimes proved a bit taxing. That’s where the appeal came in of the AMT staple Pink Lady Lemonade, which centered around a lighter, lyrical guitar hook played with hypnotic repetition. Like the set-closing Speed Guru, it was essentially a minimalist work that broke away in its own sweet time from a grounding melody and exploded into earsplitting but fascinating guitar shards.

Such was the nature of this trip. The meditative passages nicely bookended the music, sending AMT and its audience into space while the guitar outbursts left the earth below aglow but profoundly scorched.

critic’s pick 119

One of the many telling moments on Emotion & Commotion, the first studio album by Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and all around guitar great Jeff Beck, comes during a segue between its first two songs. As a graceful cover of Jeff Buckley’s Corpus Christi Carol fades out in a distant wave with a lone guitar slowly becoming enveloped by keyboards and strings, another voice enters. It’s crankier but also more playful. The guitar groove comes wrapped in vintage Jimi Hendrix wah-wah glory and bounces about with almost childlike glee. In short, you just know this sucker is going to explode. And, sure enough, it does, but with a wholly unexpected orchestral flourish. The tune, penned by Beck and his current keyboardist Jason Rebello, is aptly named – Hammerhead.

All of this sets up a wonderful sampler of styles and sounds from the 65 year old Beck that, as always, keeps listeners guessing. Gone is the industrial tinged electronica of albums like Who Else! (1999) and You Had It Coming (2001). The menu of Emotion & Commotion approximates more the mash-up summoned on Jeff (2003). But even that’s misleading. The new record eases the tension a bit and gives heavy focus to traditionally based lyricism, which is displayed liberally on a surprisingly fresh guitar and orchestra revision of Somewhere Over the Rainbow. Yet nothing here is static. The flip side of Rainbow is Never Alone, a Rebello composition that offers the warmest chime-like guitar tone Beck has committed to a record in decades – maybe ever.

And for those about to rock, as AC/DC says, Beck salutes them, too. There’s No Other Me, one of two songs featuring psychedelic soul revivalist Joss Stone, borders on the unforgiving. At the midway point, Stone howls with typical ‘60s-style ceremony. But then Beck revs up and spits out a guitar break that rolls over her voice like a monster truck. The tune was probably not designed as cutting contest, but it sure comes across as one with Beck the lone victor.

Two lesser established sirens steal even more of Stone’s thunder. Irish vocalist Imelda May gives a suitably torchy touch to another Buckley gem, Lilac Wine, while a young singer equally versed in opera and electronica, Olivia Safe, adds subtle, wordless drama to Serene and the album closing requiem Elegy for Dunkirk.

There a few quibbles here and there. The orchestrations get a bit soupy at times, especially on the Hollywood-ized Nessun Dorma. And then there’s the ceaselessly strident Stone, who is outclassed and out-sassed by almost everyone here. Those are minor bumps along the road, though, for a guitar ace still full of musical emotion, commotion and devotion.

inner galactic

galactic: drummer stanton moore, keyboardist rich vogel, guitarist jeff raines, bassist robert mercurio and saxophonist ben ellman. photo by taylor crothers.

galactic: drummer stanton moore, keyboardist rich vogel, guitarist jeff raines, bassist robert mercurio and saxophonist/harpist ben ellman. photo by taylor crothers.

That Galactic knows how to throw a party isn’t exactly news. After all, the jam-friendly funk band hails from New Orleans, the city that taught the world how to throw a celebration fueled by musical invention.

But on the band’s new ya-ka-may album, the five core members of Galactic have fashioned some multi-generational fun that will surprise even the most devout Crescent City groove merchants. It brings together some of New Orleans’ greatest musical ambassadors (Allen Toussaint, Irma Thomas and Big Chief Bo Dollis), newer generation horn stylists (The Rebirth Brass Band, Trombone Shorty) and stars of so-called “bounce music,” New Orleans own brand of hip-hop (Cheeky Blakk, Big Freedia).

Think New Orleans music already knew how to span the ages? Then you haven’t heard ya-ka-may.

“We wanted to make a record that was a snapshot of the New Orleans we see,” said Galactic keyboardist Rich Vogel. “We wanted to make a contemporary New Orleans record, but one that certainly draws from, and pays respect to, the roots of the music. We wanted to draw from the great history of New Orleans music in a way that we could tie it together with what’s going on today.

“When people talk about New Orleans and New Orleans music, they rightly focus on its place in the history of American music. And that’s all well and good. But we’re a band of the present. We’re still here and those great legends are still alive.”

As such, what backs up the ever youthful Toussaint as he sings and plays sweaty piano serenades during Bacchus is a deep pocket percussion rumble that mixes the organic drive of Galactic drummer Stanton Moore with slinky rhythmic loops.

Similarly, when bounce artists Katey Red and Sissy Nobby square off on Katey Vs. Nobby, the groove under their raps works off a variation of a traditional New Orleans second line rhythm.

“Interesting art is bubbling up in clubs and underground scenes here that maybe people outside of New Orleans aren’t aware of,” Vogel said. “So we wanted to bring the past to the present and integrate the beloved artists, the legends everyone knows, with some lesser known artists that are out there rocking the clubs with something new in that continuum of New Orleans music.”

Such a multi-generational mix isn’t altogether new for Galactic. It has been offering modern rhythmic variations since it formed as a predominantly instrumental band in 1994. But 2007’s From the Corner to the Block album accelerated the band’s musical matrix being as it was Galactic’s first album since the departure of vocalist Theryl “The Houseman” DeClouet in 2004.

“Suddenly, we had no singer,” Vogel said. “So when it came to collaborations with other people to provide a vocal element, whether it be singing or rapping, we were wide open. We didn’t have a voice to represent the band, which was perhaps a strength and a weakness at that point. We realized we had the freedom to utilize the talents of many vocal artists. On one hand, that was kind of daunting. But on the other, we were pretty excited about the possibilities.

“We worked mostly with MCs on the last record (including Juvenile, Blackalicious’ Gift of Gab and Digable Planets’ Ladybug Mecca) and more vocalists and bounce artists on ya-ta-may. It was just part of the transition in our history as a band.

But old and new Galactic fans alike might be wondering how such a studio-savvy sound that utilizes so many guests will work on the road. For its current stage sound, the band relies on the ingenuity and organic drive within its instrumental ranks – Vogel, Moore, guitarist Jeff Raines, saxophonist Ben Ellman and bassist Robert Mercurio – along with the assistance of two friends. Fleshing out the group when it visits Buster’s this week will be trombonist/rapper Corey Henry and one of the great voices of New Orleans music, Cyril Neville of the Neville Brothers.

“What we did first was find a basic structure that worked for these songs that was suitable so we could go make our first gigs of the tour. The music inevitably developed from there. Having worked with Cyril these past few months for a nearly complete U.S. tour and some shows overseas (specifically, Japan and Australia), we’ve seen him make these songs his own.

“There is still a lot of Galactic powerhouse instrumental stuff that people have come to expect. But add in the great Cyril Neville and this music just takes on a life of its own.”

Galactic with Cyril Neville and Corey Henry performs at 9 tonight at Buster’s Billiards and Backroom, 899 Manchester St. Opening will be T Bird & The Breaks and Goldenrod. Tickets are $20. Call (859) 368-8871.

Youth engaged by m-learning

E.learning Age September 1, 2005 | Naish, Richard A recent European Union (EU) m-learning project produced some positive results.

The purpose of the project – run in the UK by the Learning Skills Development Agency (LSDA) – was to engage the 16-24 year-old market with m-learning. There are 1.5 billion mobile phones in the world, that amounts to three times the number of PCs. Today’s most sophisticated phones have the processing power of a mid-1990’s PC (i.e. 400MHz chip and 128MB RAM). According to Jill Attewell, research manager of the LSDA, the aim of the project was to encourage the EU youth market towards education using mobile phones. 216 young people in Sweden, Italy and the UK took part, split evenly male/female. Before the project at least 89 per cent were reported to have literacy or numeracy needs. The standard education system did not appear to suit some of them; 59 had dropped out of education already and a further 19 were at risk of doing so. Some were certainly hard to reach groups; 32 were homeless, nine were travellers and three had been young offenders.

Each sub-group of 20 young people had a mentor to guide them and gather the results. The project used both phone-like Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) (the XDA2) and PDA-like phones (the Sony P800), which are more advanced than this group would normally use. This ensured the research was somewhat future-proof; by the time the research is completed and published technology has a habit of moving on that bit further. Since the research was conducted in mid-2004, the standard 2.5G networks rather than 3G was used. The phones went down well with the target group; one mentor said all his group were familiar with games machines such as Playstations and Gameboys and they likened the XDA2 device to a ‘turboed Game Boy’. go to web site driving test game

The idea of the project was to give young people access to small bits of learning that could be done at the bus stop. However that was sometimes exceeded; one mentor remarked on how focussed and calm they were during the sessions, ‘they gave up to two hours of time to the devices when it is normally difficult to focus them for 15 minutes’.

Two activities that most engaged the group were a collaborative learning activity called ‘mediaBoard’ and driving theory test game. The mediaBoard game involved them going out with their phones, following a map on a website and taking photos and sound clips which could be ‘stuck’ onto the map for everyone in the group to see. These photos and audio files were sent using Multimedia messaging (MMS). The players had to work collaboratively and could send messages to each other as they did the activity. It was like an online version of the mid-eighties television gameshow Treasure Hunt, with the engaging Anneka Rice and her famous multicoloured tracksuit. Once it was all compiled the groups could edit the final enhanced map on the web page. Attewell commented that the development of mediaBoard was more difficult and time-consuming than originally anticipated, particularly because of the significant differences in MMS handling between service providers.

More information on the game can be found at www.m-learning.org/mediaboard.shtml.

The results were positive in that 15 per cent of the mentors increased their perception of the individuals’ literacy and numeracy skills. Since this was a perception measure, rather than a pre- and post-test measure, this may have partly been due to the mentor better appreciating the young people’s skill rather than just an increase in their skills. The learners were enthusiastic about mobile learning and 62 per cent reported that they were keener to take part in future learning after trying mobile learning. It was notable that the preference for this future learning was for laptop/PC/mobile learning with their friends/people their own age, rather than at college on a traditional course.

There were also confidence-building side effects of this project. Firstly, some people in the group became unofficial technical support to the group, boosting their self-esteem. And secondly all the learners felt very honoured to be trusted with such an expensive bit of kit, since they said people rarely trusted them. This trust boosted their self-esteem. And the trust was not misplaced; of the 216 phones that were lent to the groups, only 6 were stolen and 2 damaged during the 3-7 week trial. And as for misuse of the phones, there were some cases of excessive use for non-project activities, but after a temporary block and a warning, this behaviour improved. It is arguable that similar or even greater loss/damage/abuse would have occurred with a more socially-advantaged group. website driving test game

LSDA is developing a toolkit – due out March 2006 – to enable teaching staff to drop their own content into templates of the games that proved so successful in this project. This will help Further Education colleges make use of m-learning for their students, without the heavy development costs associated with its development.

The two big issues facing m-learning are screensize and standards. Since the device needs to be small to be mobile, the size of the screen has to be limited physically. However there are projects to work around this, such as the ability to easily scroll around the screen without having to find small arrow buttons to do so. There is also some research being done on projecting the screen image of the phone onto a wall or desk.

The issue of standards always dogs a new technology; competing organisations develop and follow their own standards, hoping to get their standard accepted as the industry standard and thus achieve some market domination and the revenue streams that come with it. There is a constant problem that games often have to be designed on a model-by-model basis, even for the same manufacturer. This problem is further confounded by service provider issues; what works on one model on one network, will not work on another network.

See Reaching the youth market by Jill Attewell, March 2004, page 34 The mLearn conference takes place in Cape Town South Africa in late October 2005, www.mlearn.org.za/.

[Author Affiliation] Richard Naish, learning consultant Naish, Richard

in performance: drive-by truckers

drive-by truckers: brad morgan, jay gonzalez, shonna tucker, patterson hood, mike cooley and john neff. photo by danny lynch.

drive-by truckers: brad morgan, jay gonzalez, shonna tucker, patterson hood, mike cooley and john neff. photo by danny lynch.

When a band opens a sold out concert with a song titled Drag the Lake Charlie, you might suspect you’re in for a long, chilly evening. But then, the act that packed Buster’s last night was the Drive-By Truckers and the music it came to play was a deliciously twisted variation of what we have come to view as Southern rock.

The two hour program maintained a suitably energized musical core thanks to a triple guitar front line (although John Neff spent much of the evening applying plaintive pedal steel colors to the Truckers’ more wayward tunes), narratives that emphasized dark rural realities (Daddy Needs a Drink) and a stage repertoire that shifted vocal duties between guitarist/singers Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley with bassist Shonna Tucker getting two turns at the mike (for the torchy honky tonk meditation I’m Sorry Huston and It’s Gonna Be I Told You So).

Thick and swampy as the music sometimes became, the overall sentiments the Truckers displayed were largely country in origin. But the dark, domestic realities within songs like Girls Who Smoke and Life in the Factory revealed a blunt literary edge that was light years away from anything contemporary country music has thrown to the charts.

Musically, the show possessed a level of drive that circumnavigated many of the bleaker storylines. But in the evening’s two finest moments, the mood and music exquisitely coalesced. On The Wig He Made Her Wear, the most distinctive tune on the Truckers’ new The Big To-Do album, Hood outlined a saga of sex and murder that was fit – and, frankly, sick – enough for an episode of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit (which, curiously, was airing on a television at the Buster’s bar when the Truckers took the stage). But rather that underscore the disparity with obvious guitar angst, the band summoned a cool but ominous guitar whine along with the ultra-hip percussive backbeat of drummer Brad Morgan.

Later into the show, the Truckers dug into the covers cupboard again and sandwiched two dirty, dirty, dirty Warren Zevon gems – Play It All Night Long and Ain’t That Pretty At All – together into a raucous, rugged antithesis of Southern rock’s often smug self importance. The medley was grimly majestic in a way that honored Zevon’s dour genius as well as the Truckers’ own uncompromising sense of crafty invention.

in performance: california guitar trio

california guitar trio: hideyo moriya, paul richards and bert lams. photo by bill ellison.

california guitar trio: hideyo moriya, paul richards and bert lams. photo by bill ellison.

The music of the California Guitar Trio has always possessed enough sonic intensity to fill a ballroom while maintaining an especially crafty intimacy. But to have such conversational potency sitting in your lap, which was the case with a two-set performance last night at the Kentucky Coffeetree Café in Frankfort, made for some delicious sensory overload.

The cafe seats, perhaps, 40 people. So last night, artist and audience were practically rubbing shoulders. That gave well traveled CGT covers of Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody, Ennio Morricone’s theme to The Good, The Bad and the Ugly and Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata an honest, presentational worth. But for longer, moodier pieces, like Pink Floyd’s Echoes – enhanced by Paul Richards’ trippy pedal and slide effects – one felt like they were right in the cockpit of some interstellar voyage.

The performance also provided the audience an up close viewing of several new CGT compositions and arrangements. Among the former was Cathedral Peak, which circulated around a luminous but bittersweet guitar chime that emphasized the trio’s sublime tone. Stylistically, though, Hazardous Z amazed most with its mash-up of Asian and Spanish accents and a score of other appealing foreign tongues.

Of the new covers, Bert Lams’ arrangement of the Rob Lane theme to the John Adams mini-series proved a highlight. The tune’s regal Americana blend centered around a quietly anthemic melody underscored by efficient and emotive strings. All of that sounded beautifully and completely orchestrated in the trio’s hands.

But the encore of the William Tell Overture flipped the coin for an exercise in technical agility and pure, almost child-like fun. Richards’ introduced the work by saying that Wikipedia has defined intellectualism as one’s ability to listen to the overture and “not think of the Lone Ranger.” Thankfully, the CGT trumped that assumption and proved just how overrated intellectualism can be.

The California Guitar Trio performs again on Monday at the Kentucky Theatre as part of a double-taping of the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour. Showtime is 7 p.m. Tickets are $20. Call (859) 252-8888.

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