current christmas listening

george harrison: all things must pass (1970)

george harrison: all things must pass (1970)

+ George Harrison: All Things Must Pass – Okay, so it’s not technically a holiday album. But the feel is Christmas all over, from the top of Phil Spector’s muddy but still spectacular production to the spiritual slant of Harrison’s greatest music outside of The Beatles. Still far and away the finest Fab Four solo venture. A spectacular listen.

todd rundgren: runt (1970)

todd rundgren: runt (1970)

+ Todd Rundgren: Runt – Also not a seasonal album, though released concurrently with All Things Must Pass in late 1970. Rundgren’s mix of Phily soul, power pop and fuzzy guitar psychedelia sets the stage. But the album’s air of wintry mystery sells the music. I listen to this every Christmas Eve, usually while on the road (to) somewhere.

john fahey: the new possibility (1968)

john fahey: the new possibility (1968)

+ John Fahey: The New Possibility – Still my favorite Christmas album and, arguably, Fahey’s finest hour. The landmark guitarist plays carols and spirituals as though they were river tunes. Fahey’s unaccompanied acoustic guitar tone is alternately relaxed, brittle, warm and remarkably patient. Beautifully atmospheric and profoundly soulful.

waterson-carthy: holy heathens and the old green man (2006)

waterson-carthy: holy heathens and the old green man (2006)

+ Waterson-Carthy: Holy Heathens and the Old Green Man – This is the one to reach for when you want a taste of tradition. Heathens is a set of vocally dominant tunes of ages-old seasonal celebration punctuated by brass, cellos and melodeon. Leave it to the British to make merry with wassails that shake Yuletide cheer down to its very traditional core.

paddy moloney: silent night, a christmas in rome (1998)

paddy moloney: silent night, a christmas in rome (1998)

+ Paddy Maloney: Silent Night, A Christmas in Rome – A heavily orchestrated album by the chief of the Chieftains. While there are hints of animated Irish folk tradition, Silent Night bears a more global and ghostly sound. The mix of the late Derek Bell’s harp and the Bulgarian Voices Angelite on Hei Lassie is hair-raising stuff.

Langerhans cell histiocytosis.(PAHTHOLOGY CLINIC)(Report)

Ear, Nose and Throat Journal March 1, 2010 | Camelo-Piragua, Sandra Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH; formerly histiocytosis X) is a neoplastic proliferation of Langerhans cells (antigen-presenting histiocytes). Involvement of osseous and extraosseous sites of the head and neck has been reported in as many as one-third of cases. Osseous LCH may involve the flat bones of the skull, the facial bones, the bones of the jaw and sinonasal tract, and the medial part of the external auditory meatus. Destructive bone lesions can manifest as headache, toothache, tooth loss, hearing loss, and otitis media. Involvement of the skull can also cause exophthalmos and diabetes insipidus. here langerhans cell histiocytosis

[FIGURE OMITTED] Radiographically, bone lesions appear as sharp, punched-out radiolucencies. Sites of extraosseous involvement include the facial skin and scalp, the periorbital region, the gingiva, and the cervical lymph nodes.

Demographically, LCH occurs mainly in children (~1/200,000 annually), it is rare in blacks, and it has a predilection for males (male-to-female ratio 3.7:1).

It is important to remember that while LCH may present as a solitary lesion (known as an eosinophilic granuloma), it can also be multifocal and involve several systems (e.g., the liver, spleen, lung, gastrointestinal tract, and central nervous system). In Hand Schuller-Christian disease, there is multifocal involvement of a single tissue, usually bone. In Letterer-Siwe disease, there is multisystem involvement. Patients can also present with fever, rashes, and pancytopenia. The etiology of LCH is unknown. go to website langerhans cell histiocytosis

On tissue biopsy, the histopathology of LCH is distinctive. Lesions are characterized by an accumulation of mononuclear and multinucleated Langerhans cells admixed with abundant mature eosinophils (figure, A), as well as some neutrophils and small lymphocytes. Eosinophilic abscesses can feature central necrosis. Langerhans cells have grooved, folded, indented, or lobulated vesicular nuclei (figure, B). They are typically positive for immunohistochemical stains against CDla (figure, C), langerin, S-100 protein, and CD68. The hallmark of Langerhans cells is the ultrastructural presence of cytoplasmic Birbeck granules, which are rod- or tennis-racket-shaped structures (figure, D). LCH must be distinguished from reactive histiocytosis, Hodgkin lymphoma, NK/T-cell lymphoma, ErdheimChester disease (a CD 1 a-negative histiocytic disorder), and Rosai-Dorfman disease.

Patients with treated unifocal LCH have an excellent prognosis, but the presence of multisystem in volvement is a poor prognostic sign. Unifocal disease progresses to multisystem disease in about 10% of patients. Spontaneous regression has occurred in rare cases. The choice of treatment depends on the number of sites involved. Solitary lesions, which frequently occur in the head and neck, can be conservatively resected with curettage or excision. Systemic chemotherapy is administered to patients with disseminated or multifocal disease and to those who do not respond to local treatment.

Suggested reading Buchmann L, Emami A, Wei JL. Primary head and neck Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2006;135(2):312-17.

Davis SE, Rice DH. Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis: Current trends and the role of the head and neck surgeon. Ear Nose Throat J 2004;83(5):340, 342, 344 passim.

Quraishi MS, Blayney AW, Walker D, et al. Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis: Head and neck manifestations in children. Head Neck 1995;17(3):226-31.

From the Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (Dr. Camelo-Piragua); the Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Dr. Zambrano); and the Department of Pathology, Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, Mass. (Dr. Pantanowitz).

Camelo-Piragua, Sandra



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